[GaRRHistory] G&F Passenger Cars


Robert Hanson
 

1.  Do you have the car numbers?  I have a photocopy of a G&F Passenger car diagram book dated 1910 and updated by several years.  It shows only a few later acquisitions (post-1910) as having six-wheel trucks and most of those cars are head-end equipment.

As to the length - the book shows the length over end bulkheads, not over the buffers or the platforms.  Basically the inside length.  No idea as to overall length.

2.  Mainline passenger service ended in 1949.  Passenger service, via mixed trains, continued for several years thereafter, ending some time around 1953 (not certain of the date.)  I have seen passes issued to people other than G&F employees that were extended through 1953.  Still, it makes no sense for them to acquire the passenger trailers to the FM railcars (unless the Southern sold them - power car and trailer - as a package deal.)

3.  The G&F 100 (2nd) was, as of a few years ago, somewhere in New England where I imagine it will stay for some time as it is no longer acceptable for interchange (no roller bearings nor tightlock couplers) and would have to be trucked out at enormous expense.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Dills
To: GA RR History Group
Sent: Fri, Jan 18, 2013 8:49 am
Subject: [GaRRHistory] G&F Passenger Cars

 
A few questions;
 
1. In the 1943 Official Register of Passenger Train Equipment, it lists the G&F as having two 72' 62-Passenger coaches. This seems a little strange as there are also 60' coaches listed as 62-Passengers also. Do any of you know anything about these cars, and whether they had four or six wheel trucks? And would these have been the normal clerestory roof fair that was common on the G&F? Or could they have had a arch/round roof?
 
2. Alan Lind's book on the St Louis Car Company indicates that the G&F bought the trailer coaches for both the #40 and #41 Vulcan units. This would seem unlikely as passenger train service ended in 1949 on the G&F. So I really can't see the necessity of buying them in 1955. Can any of you confirm that Lind's statement in the book is correct? 
 
3. There were two Pullman observation cars purchased in 1955 by the G&F. The first car, Mt Hillers,& nbsp;became the G&F 's second #100 business car. According to Pullman records, it was in the worst shape of the two. According to Langley's book, the second car, Mountain Road was put into MOW service then later donated to the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum. Do any of you know what happened to the car?  I have not been able to locate it at TVRM or find anyone that knows anything about this.
 
 
THANKS!


Chris Dills <cddx@...>
 

Bob,
 
Thanks for responding,
 
 
1. Cars #1001-1002, I'm guessing by the size they would almost have to be six wheel cars. They are also listed in Langley's book as unknown builder and unknow wheels/trucks.
 
2. Even if it was a package deal, why would they have bought the trailer for #40 also? Seems unlikely still.
 
3. The #100 went to the Merrimack Valley Railroad museum then was sold to a private collector, not sure of whom. But I'm actually asking about a second car that was bought along with this unit in 1955. It was previously the Pullman "Mountain Road". Langley's book indicates that it was used for MOW service and then later donated to the TVRM. Have not been able to get in contact with anyone at TVRM that knows about it. Will try again later. I do have a photo of this car sitting on the "dead" line at the Douglas shops. Two former employees, a local railfan, and my father in law all say that they remember it sitting there but never remember it moving. Even on wreck trains, older cars were used, but no one seems to remember this one ever being used.
 

To: GaRRHistory@...
From: RHanson669@...
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2013 10:20:24 -0500
Subject: Re: [GaRRHistory] G&F Passenger Cars

 
1.  Do you have the car numbers?  I have a photocopy of a G&F Passenger car diagram book dated 1910 and updated by several years.  It shows only a few later acquisitions (post-1910) as having six-wheel trucks and most of those cars are head-end equipment.

As to the length - the book shows the length over end bulkheads, not over the buffers or the platforms.  Basically the inside length.  No idea as to overall length.

2.  Mainline passenger service ended in 1949.  Passenger service, via mixed trains, continued for several years thereafter, ending some time around 1953 (not certain of the date.)  I have seen passes issued to people other than G&F employees that were extended through 1953.  Still, it makes no sense for them to acquire the passenger trailers to the FM railcars (unless the Southern sold them - power car and trailer - as a package deal.)

3.  The G&F 100 (2nd) was, as of a few years ago, somewhere in New England where I imagine it will stay for some time as it is no longer acceptable for interchange (no roller bearings nor tightlock couplers) and would have to be trucked out at enormous expense.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Dills
To: GA RR History Group
Sent: Fri, Jan 18, 2013 8:49 am
Subject: [GaRRHistory] G&F Passenger Cars

 
A few questions;
 
1. In the 1943 Official Register of Passenger Train Equipment, it lists the G&F as having two 72' 62-Passenger coaches. This seems a little strange as there are also 60' coaches listed as 62-Passengers also. Do any of you know anything about these cars, and whether they had four or six wheel trucks? And would these have been the normal clerestory roof fair that was common on the G&F? Or could they have had a arch/round roof?
 
2. Alan Lind's book on the St Louis Car Company indicates that the G&F bought the trailer coaches for both the #40 and #41 Vulcan units. This would seem unlikely as passenger train service ended in 1949 on the G&F. So I really can't see the necessity of buying them in 1955. Can any of you confirm that Lind's statement in the book is correct? 
 
3. There were two Pullman observation cars purchased in 1955 by the G&F. The first car, Mt Hillers,& nbsp;became the G&F 's second #100 business car. According to Pullman records, it was in the worst shape of the two. According to Langley's book, the second car, Mountain Road was put into MOW service then later donated to the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum. Do any of you know what happened to the car?  I have not been able to locate it at TVRM or find anyone that knows anything about this.
 
 
THANKS!


Robert Hanson
 

Those numbers are not in my diagram book so they must have been acquired much later.  My book stops prior to 1920.)

No, it doesn't make any sense for the G&F to have acquired the trailers to the motor cars.  But then, in my opinion, there's a lot about the G&F that doesn't make sense, including the formation of the railroad itself.

Bob


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Dills
To: GA RR History Group
Sent: Fri, Jan 18, 2013 10:46 am
Subject: RE: [GaRRHistory] G&F Passenger Cars

 
Bob,
 
Thanks for responding,
 
 
1. Cars #1001-1002, I'm guessing by the size they would almost have to be six wheel cars. They are also listed in Langley's book as unknown builder and unknow wheels/trucks.
 
2. Even if it was a package deal, why would they have bought the trailer for #40 also? Seems unlikely still.
 
3. The #100 went to the Merrimack Valley Railroad museum then was sold to a private collector, not sure of whom. But I'm actually asking about a second car that was bought along with this unit in 1955. It was previously the Pullman "Mountain Road". Langley's book indicates that it was used for MOW service and then later donated to the TVRM. Have not been able to get in contact with anyone at TVRM that knows about it. Will try again later. I do have a photo of this car sitting on the "dead" line at the Douglas shops. Two former employees, a local railfan, and my father in law all say that they remember it sitting there but never remember it moving. Even on wreck trains, older cars were used, but no one seems to remember this one ever being used.
 

To: GaRRHistory@...
From: RHanson669@...
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2013 10:20:24 -0500
Subject: Re: [GaRRHistory] G&F Passenger Cars

 
1.  Do you have the car numbers?  I have a photocopy of a G&F Passenger car diagram book dated 1910 and updated by several years.  It shows only a few later acquisitions (post-1910) as having six-wheel trucks and most of those cars are head-end equipment.

As to the length - the book shows the length over end bulkheads, not over the buffers or the platforms.  Basically the inside length.  No idea as to overall length.

2.  Mainline passenger service ended in 1949.  Passenger service, via mixed trains, continued for several years thereafter, ending some time around 1953 (not certain of the date.)  I have seen passes issued to people other than G&F employees that were extended through 1953.  Still, it makes no sense for them to acquire the passenger trailers to the FM railcars (unless the Southern sold them - power car and trailer - as a package deal.)

3.  The G&F 100 (2nd) was, as of a few years ago, somewhere in New England where I imagine it will stay for some time as it is no longer acceptable for interchange (no roller bearings nor tightlock couplers) and would have to be trucked out at enormous expense.

Bob Hanson
Loganville, GA


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Dills <cddx@...>
To: GA RR History Group <garrhistory@...>
Sent: Fri, Jan 18, 2013 8:49 am
Subject: [GaRRHistory] G&F Passenger Cars

 
A few questions;
 
1. In the 1943 Official Register of Passenger Train Equipment, it lists the G&F as having two 72' 62-Passenger coaches. This seems a little strange as there are also 60' coaches listed as 62-Passengers also. Do any of you know anything about these cars, and whether they had four or six wheel trucks? And would these have been the normal clerestory roof fair that was common on the G&F? Or could they have had a arch/round roof?
 
2. Alan Lind's book on the St Louis Car Company indicates that the G&F bought the trailer coaches for both the #40 and #41 Vulcan units. This would seem unlikely as passenger train service ended in 1949 on the G&F. So I really can't see the necessity of buying them in 1955. Can any of you confirm that Lind's statement in the book is correct? 
 
3. There were two Pullman observation cars purchased in 1955 by the G&F. The first car, Mt Hillers,& nbsp;became the G&F 's second #100 business car. According to Pullman records, it was in the worst shape of the two. According to Langley's book, the second car, Mountain Road was put into MOW service then later donated to the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum. Do any of you know what happened to the car?  I have not been able to locate it at TVRM or find anyone that knows anything about this.
 
 
THANKS!