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What didn't Model Railroaders have between 1934 and 1973 ?


Mark Cartwright
 

Distractions  


Bruce Wilson
 

I would think WWII was a bit of a distraction
Bruce Wilson
Barrie, Ontario
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On 03/08/2019 20:39, Mark Cartwright via Groups.Io wrote:

Distractions  


Mark Cartwright
 

Surprisingly, The Model Railroaders Magazine made few references to the War


Russell Courtenay
 

I think Model Railroading is escapism at its finest! And these lists have enforced policies of no religion, politics or ‘non family-friendly content’ that make them some of the most enjoyable things to do online! 

Unfortunately, the world in general doesn’t get along well, but we are able to create our miniature worlds with as little or as much of the real world as WE WANT, I think that is one of the things that makes model railroading wonderful!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 3, 2019, at 8:13 PM, Mark Cartwright via Groups.Io <marcdecapri@...> wrote:

Surprisingly, The Model Railroaders Magazine made few references to the War


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Whereas politics and other topics can cause arguments, so are a good policy to have for most forums.......I have to disagree with the often OVERUSED term Escapism Russell.   I have heard this term used before... I guess I have to take issue with it.  

    Imbibing oneself in a hobby such as model railroading, or most any hobby, and the term "escapism" are very different concepts.   Now it could be true that a few are hiding from life in some way and choose to do so in the basement with trains.  (sounds like a horrible life no matter the means of escape) ME... I'd get out of it.. rather than try and find solace in a train....   

    "Escapism" can be well describe in the act of buying new expensive clothes or buying and driving an expensive car to make yourself feel you have some different status in the world as well as hiding from the real world because your too weak to stand up to it....  !      It does not describe the majority of us in this hobby.....   I know many guys who are not HIDING from Politics or Family issues (and we of course all have them).  Many of us "deal with" life head on, and do not find life terrifying, as those seeking escapism seems to describe.

   Enjoying a creative outlet, such as this hobby provides, is simply that, in most cases.  A place to "create"     For myself I have a lifetime's worth of professional skills and a lifelong interest in this pursuit and a lifelong respect for John Allen.   I don't do what I do, to hide from my life....   I thrive in this medium....   I am having the time of my life...  I am enjoying every minute of my time spent indulging myself here, and glad I am healthy enough to do it.   

This hobby often ends up finding a willing family that participates as well.  The kids get involved and some stay with it throughout their lives, some don't.   But fun is had making things and knowledge of history and architecture and engineering and to see the world better are gained even through even just a peripheral view.  Often wives end up enjoying the process and the shows...     Now I only speak for myself and of the observations I have witnessed in my life....but from what I see, this hobby is not "the finest form of escapism"    It is simply "the finest hobby"...    Escapism is low on the list of reasons to participate here.     And this term is used too often to describe our dreams.     IMHO.............   

Randy


Russell Courtenay
 

I meant escapism only in the most literal, literary and complimentary way. Here is the definition from Wiki, which many reject but is actually pretty accurate in most things. 

“Escapism is the avoidance of unpleasant, boring, arduous, scary, or banal aspects of daily life. It can also be used as a term to define the actions people take to help relieve persistent feelings of depression or general sadness.

Perceptions. 

Entire industries have sprung up to foster a growing tendency of people to remove themselves from the rigors of daily life – especially into the digital world. Many activities that are normal parts of a healthy existence (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercise, sexual activity) can also become avenues of escapism when taken to extremes or out of proper context; and as a result the word "escapism" often carries a negative connotation, suggesting that escapists are unhappy, with an inability or unwillingness to connect meaningfully with the world and to take necessary action. Indeed, the Oxford English Dictionary defined escapism as "The tendency to seek, or the practice of seeking, distraction from what normally has to be endured".

However, many challenge the idea that escapism is fundamentally and exclusively negative. C. S. Lewis was fond of humorously remarking that the usual enemies of escape were jailers; and considered that used in moderation escapism could serve both to refresh and to expand the imaginative powers. Similarly J. R. R. Tolkien argued for escapism in fantasy literature as the creative expression of reality within a secondary (imaginative) world, (but also emphasised that they required an element of horror in them, if they were not to be 'mere escapism'). Terry Pratchett considered that the twentieth century had seen the development over time of a more positive view of escapist literature. Apart from literature, music has been seen and valued as an artistic medium of escape, too.”

Of course I love music and though I don’t live my life by the words of a good song, I think of them often:

I looked out this morning and the sun was gone
Turned on some music to start my day
I lost myself in a familiar song
I closed my eyes and I slipped away”

I bet you can hear the music now, I can! I might just wake the kids by turning up my stereo to unknown levels before 9AM!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 4, 2019, at 8:01 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Whereas politics and other topics can cause arguments, so are a good policy to have for most forums.......I have to disagree with the often OVERUSED term Escapism Russell.   I have heard this term used before... I guess I have to take issue with it.  

    Imbibing oneself in a hobby such as model railroading, or most any hobby, and the term "escapism" are very different concepts.   Now it could be true that a few are hiding from life in some way and choose to do so in the basement with trains.  (sounds like a horrible life no matter the means of escape) ME... I'd get out of it.. rather than try and find solace in a train....   

    "Escapism" can be well describe in the act of buying new expensive clothes or buying and driving an expensive car to make yourself feel you have some different status in the world as well as hiding from the real world because your too weak to stand up to it....  !      It does not describe the majority of us in this hobby.....   I know many guys who are not HIDING from Politics or Family issues (and we of course all have them).  Many of us "deal with" life head on, and do not find life terrifying, as those seeking escapism seems to describe.

   Enjoying a creative outlet, such as this hobby provides, is simply that, in most cases.  A place to "create"     For myself I have a lifetime's worth of professional skills and a lifelong interest in this pursuit and a lifelong respect for John Allen.   I don't do what I do, to hide from my life....   I thrive in this medium....   I am having the time of my life...  I am enjoying every minute of my time spent indulging myself here, and glad I am healthy enough to do it.   

This hobby often ends up finding a willing family that participates as well.  The kids get involved and some stay with it throughout their lives, some don't.   But fun is had making things and knowledge of history and architecture and engineering and to see the world better are gained even through even just a peripheral view.  Often wives end up enjoying the process and the shows...     Now I only speak for myself and of the observations I have witnessed in my life....but from what I see, this hobby is not "the finest form of escapism"    It is simply "the finest hobby"...    Escapism is low on the list of reasons to participate here.     And this term is used too often to describe our dreams.     IMHO.............   

Randy


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Well Sir,  like I said....  It is not just "your" use of it as a description to define model railroading....   "Many" people describe many hobby's as "Escapism"      That term describes a dark and dirty thing. 

Was just making the point that is often misused.   Meant no offence to you, just the wide misuse of the term I have heard from others for a long time.  

Randy   

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 11:01 AM Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I meant escapism only in the most literal, literary and complimentary way. Here is the definition from Wiki, which many reject but is actually pretty accurate in most things. 

“Escapism is the avoidance of unpleasant, boring, arduous, scary, or banal aspects of daily life. It can also be used as a term to define the actions people take to help relieve persistent feelings of depression or general sadness.

Perceptions. 

Entire industries have sprung up to foster a growing tendency of people to remove themselves from the rigors of daily life – especially into the digital world. Many activities that are normal parts of a healthy existence (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercise, sexual activity) can also become avenues of escapism when taken to extremes or out of proper context; and as a result the word "escapism" often carries a negative connotation, suggesting that escapists are unhappy, with an inability or unwillingness to connect meaningfully with the world and to take necessary action. Indeed, the Oxford English Dictionary defined escapism as "The tendency to seek, or the practice of seeking, distraction from what normally has to be endured".

However, many challenge the idea that escapism is fundamentally and exclusively negative. C. S. Lewis was fond of humorously remarking that the usual enemies of escape were jailers; and considered that used in moderation escapism could serve both to refresh and to expand the imaginative powers. Similarly J. R. R. Tolkien argued for escapism in fantasy literature as the creative expression of reality within a secondary (imaginative) world, (but also emphasised that they required an element of horror in them, if they were not to be 'mere escapism'). Terry Pratchett considered that the twentieth century had seen the development over time of a more positive view of escapist literature. Apart from literature, music has been seen and valued as an artistic medium of escape, too.”

Of course I love music and though I don’t live my life by the words of a good song, I think of them often:

I looked out this morning and the sun was gone
Turned on some music to start my day
I lost myself in a familiar song
I closed my eyes and I slipped away”

I bet you can hear the music now, I can! I might just wake the kids by turning up my stereo to unknown levels before 9AM!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 4, 2019, at 8:01 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Whereas politics and other topics can cause arguments, so are a good policy to have for most forums.......I have to disagree with the often OVERUSED term Escapism Russell.   I have heard this term used before... I guess I have to take issue with it.  

    Imbibing oneself in a hobby such as model railroading, or most any hobby, and the term "escapism" are very different concepts.   Now it could be true that a few are hiding from life in some way and choose to do so in the basement with trains.  (sounds like a horrible life no matter the means of escape) ME... I'd get out of it.. rather than try and find solace in a train....   

    "Escapism" can be well describe in the act of buying new expensive clothes or buying and driving an expensive car to make yourself feel you have some different status in the world as well as hiding from the real world because your too weak to stand up to it....  !      It does not describe the majority of us in this hobby.....   I know many guys who are not HIDING from Politics or Family issues (and we of course all have them).  Many of us "deal with" life head on, and do not find life terrifying, as those seeking escapism seems to describe.

   Enjoying a creative outlet, such as this hobby provides, is simply that, in most cases.  A place to "create"     For myself I have a lifetime's worth of professional skills and a lifelong interest in this pursuit and a lifelong respect for John Allen.   I don't do what I do, to hide from my life....   I thrive in this medium....   I am having the time of my life...  I am enjoying every minute of my time spent indulging myself here, and glad I am healthy enough to do it.   

This hobby often ends up finding a willing family that participates as well.  The kids get involved and some stay with it throughout their lives, some don't.   But fun is had making things and knowledge of history and architecture and engineering and to see the world better are gained even through even just a peripheral view.  Often wives end up enjoying the process and the shows...     Now I only speak for myself and of the observations I have witnessed in my life....but from what I see, this hobby is not "the finest form of escapism"    It is simply "the finest hobby"...    Escapism is low on the list of reasons to participate here.     And this term is used too often to describe our dreams.     IMHO.............   

Randy


Russell Courtenay
 

I understand, no offense taken Randy. Words are fascinating and powerful, much like so many things from music to fantastic model railroads!

Reminds me of something I found out years ago when I was learning Spanish; hobby is pasatiempo or ‘pastime’, i took it as rather offensive that my hobby was something I did just to ‘pass the time when I am bored’ like whittling a stick down to nothing just because. 

My hobbies meant a lot to me, they helped me make my dreams a reality in miniature, tell stories that came to my head, wether realistic, freelanced, fantastic or musical. I was mistaken. 

The definition is rather long but enlightening. 

hobby is a regular activity done for enjoyment, typically during one's leisure time, not professionally and not for pay. Hobbies include collecting themed items and objects, engaging in creative and artistic pursuits, playing sports, or pursuing other amusements. Participation in hobbies encourages acquiring substantial skills and knowledge in that area. A list of hobbies changes with renewed interests and developing fashions, making it diverse and lengthy. Hobbies tend to follow trends in society, for example stamp collecting was popular during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as postal systems were the main means of communication, while video gamesare more popular nowadays following technological advances. The advancing production and technology of the nineteenth century provided workers with more availability in leisure time to engage in hobbies. Because of this, the efforts of people investing in hobbies has increased with time. 

According to the serious leisure perspective, a hobby is an enduring serious leisure pursuit having no significant professional counterpart and being too poorly remunerated to constitute a livelihood.[1] Hobbyists are distinguished from Amateurs, who do have professional counterparts (e.g., professional actors, scientists, entertainers, athletes) and from specialized career volunteers with their interest in altruistically serving other people.”


Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 4, 2019, at 9:40 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Well Sir,  like I said....  It is not just "your" use of it as a description to define model railroading....   "Many" people describe many hobby's as "Escapism"      That term describes a dark and dirty thing. 

Was just making the point that is often misused.   Meant no offence to you, just the wide misuse of the term I have heard from others for a long time.  

Randy   

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 11:01 AM Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I meant escapism only in the most literal, literary and complimentary way. Here is the definition from Wiki, which many reject but is actually pretty accurate in most things. 

“Escapism is the avoidance of unpleasant, boring, arduous, scary, or banal aspects of daily life. It can also be used as a term to define the actions people take to help relieve persistent feelings of depression or general sadness.

Perceptions. 

Entire industries have sprung up to foster a growing tendency of people to remove themselves from the rigors of daily life – especially into the digital world. Many activities that are normal parts of a healthy existence (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercise, sexual activity) can also become avenues of escapism when taken to extremes or out of proper context; and as a result the word "escapism" often carries a negative connotation, suggesting that escapists are unhappy, with an inability or unwillingness to connect meaningfully with the world and to take necessary action. Indeed, the Oxford English Dictionary defined escapism as "The tendency to seek, or the practice of seeking, distraction from what normally has to be endured".

However, many challenge the idea that escapism is fundamentally and exclusively negative. C. S. Lewis was fond of humorously remarking that the usual enemies of escape were jailers; and considered that used in moderation escapism could serve both to refresh and to expand the imaginative powers. Similarly J. R. R. Tolkien argued for escapism in fantasy literature as the creative expression of reality within a secondary (imaginative) world, (but also emphasised that they required an element of horror in them, if they were not to be 'mere escapism'). Terry Pratchett considered that the twentieth century had seen the development over time of a more positive view of escapist literature. Apart from literature, music has been seen and valued as an artistic medium of escape, too.”

Of course I love music and though I don’t live my life by the words of a good song, I think of them often:

I looked out this morning and the sun was gone
Turned on some music to start my day
I lost myself in a familiar song
I closed my eyes and I slipped away”

I bet you can hear the music now, I can! I might just wake the kids by turning up my stereo to unknown levels before 9AM!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 4, 2019, at 8:01 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Whereas politics and other topics can cause arguments, so are a good policy to have for most forums.......I have to disagree with the often OVERUSED term Escapism Russell.   I have heard this term used before... I guess I have to take issue with it.  

    Imbibing oneself in a hobby such as model railroading, or most any hobby, and the term "escapism" are very different concepts.   Now it could be true that a few are hiding from life in some way and choose to do so in the basement with trains.  (sounds like a horrible life no matter the means of escape) ME... I'd get out of it.. rather than try and find solace in a train....   

    "Escapism" can be well describe in the act of buying new expensive clothes or buying and driving an expensive car to make yourself feel you have some different status in the world as well as hiding from the real world because your too weak to stand up to it....  !      It does not describe the majority of us in this hobby.....   I know many guys who are not HIDING from Politics or Family issues (and we of course all have them).  Many of us "deal with" life head on, and do not find life terrifying, as those seeking escapism seems to describe.

   Enjoying a creative outlet, such as this hobby provides, is simply that, in most cases.  A place to "create"     For myself I have a lifetime's worth of professional skills and a lifelong interest in this pursuit and a lifelong respect for John Allen.   I don't do what I do, to hide from my life....   I thrive in this medium....   I am having the time of my life...  I am enjoying every minute of my time spent indulging myself here, and glad I am healthy enough to do it.   

This hobby often ends up finding a willing family that participates as well.  The kids get involved and some stay with it throughout their lives, some don't.   But fun is had making things and knowledge of history and architecture and engineering and to see the world better are gained even through even just a peripheral view.  Often wives end up enjoying the process and the shows...     Now I only speak for myself and of the observations I have witnessed in my life....but from what I see, this hobby is not "the finest form of escapism"    It is simply "the finest hobby"...    Escapism is low on the list of reasons to participate here.     And this term is used too often to describe our dreams.     IMHO.............   

Randy


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Yes indeed Russell...    and of the many hobbies many of us have indulged, this one is the very best for so many reasons.  

Randy

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 2:55 PM Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I understand, no offense taken Randy. Words are fascinating and powerful, much like so many things from music to fantastic model railroads!

Reminds me of something I found out years ago when I was learning Spanish; hobby is pasatiempo or ‘pastime’, i took it as rather offensive that my hobby was something I did just to ‘pass the time when I am bored’ like whittling a stick down to nothing just because. 

My hobbies meant a lot to me, they helped me make my dreams a reality in miniature, tell stories that came to my head, wether realistic, freelanced, fantastic or musical. I was mistaken. 

The definition is rather long but enlightening. 

hobby is a regular activity done for enjoyment, typically during one's leisure time, not professionally and not for pay. Hobbies include collecting themed items and objects, engaging in creative and artistic pursuits, playing sports, or pursuing other amusements. Participation in hobbies encourages acquiring substantial skills and knowledge in that area. A list of hobbies changes with renewed interests and developing fashions, making it diverse and lengthy. Hobbies tend to follow trends in society, for example stamp collecting was popular during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as postal systems were the main means of communication, while video gamesare more popular nowadays following technological advances. The advancing production and technology of the nineteenth century provided workers with more availability in leisure time to engage in hobbies. Because of this, the efforts of people investing in hobbies has increased with time. 

According to the serious leisure perspective, a hobby is an enduring serious leisure pursuit having no significant professional counterpart and being too poorly remunerated to constitute a livelihood.[1] Hobbyists are distinguished from Amateurs, who do have professional counterparts (e.g., professional actors, scientists, entertainers, athletes) and from specialized career volunteers with their interest in altruistically serving other people.”


Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 4, 2019, at 9:40 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Well Sir,  like I said....  It is not just "your" use of it as a description to define model railroading....   "Many" people describe many hobby's as "Escapism"      That term describes a dark and dirty thing. 

Was just making the point that is often misused.   Meant no offence to you, just the wide misuse of the term I have heard from others for a long time.  

Randy   

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 11:01 AM Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I meant escapism only in the most literal, literary and complimentary way. Here is the definition from Wiki, which many reject but is actually pretty accurate in most things. 

“Escapism is the avoidance of unpleasant, boring, arduous, scary, or banal aspects of daily life. It can also be used as a term to define the actions people take to help relieve persistent feelings of depression or general sadness.

Perceptions. 

Entire industries have sprung up to foster a growing tendency of people to remove themselves from the rigors of daily life – especially into the digital world. Many activities that are normal parts of a healthy existence (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercise, sexual activity) can also become avenues of escapism when taken to extremes or out of proper context; and as a result the word "escapism" often carries a negative connotation, suggesting that escapists are unhappy, with an inability or unwillingness to connect meaningfully with the world and to take necessary action. Indeed, the Oxford English Dictionary defined escapism as "The tendency to seek, or the practice of seeking, distraction from what normally has to be endured".

However, many challenge the idea that escapism is fundamentally and exclusively negative. C. S. Lewis was fond of humorously remarking that the usual enemies of escape were jailers; and considered that used in moderation escapism could serve both to refresh and to expand the imaginative powers. Similarly J. R. R. Tolkien argued for escapism in fantasy literature as the creative expression of reality within a secondary (imaginative) world, (but also emphasised that they required an element of horror in them, if they were not to be 'mere escapism'). Terry Pratchett considered that the twentieth century had seen the development over time of a more positive view of escapist literature. Apart from literature, music has been seen and valued as an artistic medium of escape, too.”

Of course I love music and though I don’t live my life by the words of a good song, I think of them often:

I looked out this morning and the sun was gone
Turned on some music to start my day
I lost myself in a familiar song
I closed my eyes and I slipped away”

I bet you can hear the music now, I can! I might just wake the kids by turning up my stereo to unknown levels before 9AM!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 4, 2019, at 8:01 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Whereas politics and other topics can cause arguments, so are a good policy to have for most forums.......I have to disagree with the often OVERUSED term Escapism Russell.   I have heard this term used before... I guess I have to take issue with it.  

    Imbibing oneself in a hobby such as model railroading, or most any hobby, and the term "escapism" are very different concepts.   Now it could be true that a few are hiding from life in some way and choose to do so in the basement with trains.  (sounds like a horrible life no matter the means of escape) ME... I'd get out of it.. rather than try and find solace in a train....   

    "Escapism" can be well describe in the act of buying new expensive clothes or buying and driving an expensive car to make yourself feel you have some different status in the world as well as hiding from the real world because your too weak to stand up to it....  !      It does not describe the majority of us in this hobby.....   I know many guys who are not HIDING from Politics or Family issues (and we of course all have them).  Many of us "deal with" life head on, and do not find life terrifying, as those seeking escapism seems to describe.

   Enjoying a creative outlet, such as this hobby provides, is simply that, in most cases.  A place to "create"     For myself I have a lifetime's worth of professional skills and a lifelong interest in this pursuit and a lifelong respect for John Allen.   I don't do what I do, to hide from my life....   I thrive in this medium....   I am having the time of my life...  I am enjoying every minute of my time spent indulging myself here, and glad I am healthy enough to do it.   

This hobby often ends up finding a willing family that participates as well.  The kids get involved and some stay with it throughout their lives, some don't.   But fun is had making things and knowledge of history and architecture and engineering and to see the world better are gained even through even just a peripheral view.  Often wives end up enjoying the process and the shows...     Now I only speak for myself and of the observations I have witnessed in my life....but from what I see, this hobby is not "the finest form of escapism"    It is simply "the finest hobby"...    Escapism is low on the list of reasons to participate here.     And this term is used too often to describe our dreams.     IMHO.............   

Randy


Charles Kinzer
 

I think model railroading is not the same for everyone.

 

Some just like running the trains in a sense like many of us did with the Lionel Trains.

Some want to recreate some local railroad(s) of their misspent youth.

Some blur it into the actual history and other realities of railroading.

Some want mainly to create and have something to show for it perhaps even hoping it is part of their legacy (although most layouts don’t survive much past their owners).

Some focus on one aspect such as electronics or operation or building structures, and perhaps also enjoy, or perhaps tolerate, the other aspects.

Some use it largely as a diversion from the stresses of normal life (by adding a bunch of new stresses of an abnormal life - curious).

Some use it at least partially for socializing.

Some use it at least partially for being anti-social (hiding out in the basement or being the “lone wolf” modeler)

Some may like it as a means to have a little world that THEY control and have power over.  (Actually, a big reason kids love toy trains, if they get the chance to get some).

And likely many more reasons.

 

For me, the main thing I would miss are the occasional stabs of a No. 11 X-Acto blade with a few soldering iron burns mixed in for variety.  And while I use a paint hood and other protection, there is still that whiff of perfume that some call solvents.  And if a week goes by without CA gluing a finger to something, I feel I’m not doing enough.

 

So what motivated John Allen?  Probably many things.  Probably some of those I listed.  Maybe more.  Maybe the effort he expended might be like others dote on their children.  Who knows.

 

Oh, I’ve tried some other hobbies.  And still occasionally model something non-railroady.  Even tried flying model airplanes once.  But this joke covers that topic pretty well.  (At least their “right of way”, air, is free.)

 

 

Charles E. “Chuck” Kinzer

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Randy Lee Decker
Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2019 12:10 PM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] What didn't Model Railroaders have between 1934 and 1973 ?

 

Yes indeed Russell...    and of the many hobbies many of us have indulged, this one is the very best for so many reasons.  

 

Randy

 

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 2:55 PM Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I understand, no offense taken Randy. Words are fascinating and powerful, much like so many things from music to fantastic model railroads!

 

Reminds me of something I found out years ago when I was learning Spanish; hobby is pasatiempo or ‘pastime’, i took it as rather offensive that my hobby was something I did just to ‘pass the time when I am bored’ like whittling a stick down to nothing just because. 

 

My hobbies meant a lot to me, they helped me make my dreams a reality in miniature, tell stories that came to my head, wether realistic, freelanced, fantastic or musical. I was mistaken. 

 

The definition is rather long but enlightening. 

 

“A hobby is a regular activity done for enjoyment, typically during one's leisure time, not professionally and not for pay. Hobbies include collecting themed items and objects, engaging in creative and artistic pursuits, playing sports, or pursuing other amusements. Participation in hobbies encourages acquiring substantial skills and knowledge in that area. A list of hobbies changes with renewed interests and developing fashions, making it diverse and lengthy. Hobbies tend to follow trends in society, for example stamp collecting was popular during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as postal systems were the main means of communication, while video gamesare more popular nowadays following technological advances. The advancing production and technology of the nineteenth century provided workers with more availability in leisure time to engage in hobbies. Because of this, the efforts of people investing in hobbies has increased with time. 

According to the serious leisure perspective, a hobby is an enduring serious leisure pursuit having no significant professional counterpart and being too poorly remunerated to constitute a livelihood.[1] Hobbyists are distinguished from Amateurs, who do have professional counterparts (e.g., professional actors, scientists, entertainers, athletes) and from specialized career volunteers with their interest in altruistically serving other people.”

 

Russell Courtenay

July is national what month?

 


David Thomas
 

Hi Mark
I'm not at all surprised that the MRR magazines made so few references to the War. The war was a grim reality for most people and a hobby  provided a certain respite from it. I've been through the two main British magazines of that period and it's very clear that, though some people were able to continue modelling using whatever materials they had in stock or were able to salvage, many more were planning for the model railways they would build once life returned to normal. Quite a lot of readers letters and contributions were signed by people OAS (On active service) which meant they were in a military unit somewhere almost certainly away from home. and unlikely to be able to do much if any actual modelling. They could though study drawings and develop layout plans even on scraps of paper. The result was a flowering of layout building soon after the war, despite great shortages of wood and metals of every kind ( I think this latter may have been truer in Britan than the US) 


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Well said David..  And in those cases of extreme social upheaval and imagine the life of a soldier in Europe, or not long after in Korea or Vietnam, and their need for escapism.    This hobby in magazines would have been one of many to help achieve that goal. In that time and that kind of need to get away from a a life you do not want must have been overwhelming.   

     Later when the wars were done... and life changed for so many of these men...and some women.. the hobby was a pleasant outlet for the relaxing, satisfaction of accomplishment and skill building.   

     Randy

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 5:41 PM David Thomas via Groups.Io <david.thomas967=ntlworld.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Mark
I'm not at all surprised that the MRR magazines made so few references to the War. The war was a grim reality for most people and a hobby  provided a certain respite from it. I've been through the two main British magazines of that period and it's very clear that, though some people were able to continue modelling using whatever materials they had in stock or were able to salvage, many more were planning for the model railways they would build once life returned to normal. Quite a lot of readers letters and contributions were signed by people OAS (On active service) which meant they were in a military unit somewhere almost certainly away from home. and unlikely to be able to do much if any actual modelling. They could though study drawings and develop layout plans even on scraps of paper. The result was a flowering of layout building soon after the war, despite great shortages of wood and metals of every kind ( I think this latter may have been truer in Britan than the US) 


Charles Kinzer
 

You actually saw more war related comments in the advertising than in the editorial content.  MANY war references in the ads.  You can see the progression from shortages to conversion to other production to getting ready to get back to normal post war.  Kalmbach had at least some editorials mentioning disruptions such as having to move because the government needed their building!  But they stuck mainly to model railroading.

 

It was pretty impossible to read Model Railroader during the war years and not see MANY references to the war, albeit usually not in the articles.  They knew they weren’t Life Magazine.

 

Here is a sampling of Model Railroader war-time references:

 

Almost all covers were the usual model railroading lore, but a couple weren’t.  Also, almost all covers had only black and process blue ink.  These two added a third process color.  (July 1943 and June 1944.)

 

  

 

June, 1942 Lionel ad:

 

 

Mantua had many full page ads referencing the war.

 

December, 1942:

 

 

March, 1943:

 

December, 1943:

 

 

 

July 1944 from Varney:

 

 

Charles E. “Chuck” Kinzer

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Randy Lee Decker
Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2019 2:55 PM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] What didn't Model Railroaders have between 1934 and 1973 ?

 

Well said David..  And in those cases of extreme social upheaval and imagine the life of a soldier in Europe, or not long after in Korea or Vietnam, and their need for escapism.    This hobby in magazines would have been one of many to help achieve that goal. In that time and that kind of need to get away from a a life you do not want must have been overwhelming.   

 

     Later when the wars were done... and life changed for so many of these men...and some women.. the hobby was a pleasant outlet for the relaxing, satisfaction of accomplishment and skill building.   

 

     Randy

 

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 5:41 PM David Thomas via Groups.Io <david.thomas967=ntlworld.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Mark
I'm not at all surprised that the MRR magazines made so few references to the War. The war was a grim reality for most people and a hobby  provided a certain respite from it. I've been through the two main British magazines of that period and it's very clear that, though some people were able to continue modelling using whatever materials they had in stock or were able to salvage, many more were planning for the model railways they would build once life returned to normal. Quite a lot of readers letters and contributions were signed by people OAS (On active service) which meant they were in a military unit somewhere almost certainly away from home. and unlikely to be able to do much if any actual modelling. They could though study drawings and develop layout plans even on scraps of paper. The result was a flowering of layout building soon after the war, despite great shortages of wood and metals of every kind ( I think this latter may have been truer in Britan than the US)