Topics

PR #15 USRA 0-8-0 Switcher


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

I posted photos of my PR #15 USRA 0-8-0 switcher. My version of the GD #15 USRA 0-8-0 switcher is a Life Like (now Walthers) circa 2000 loco. This version has electrical pick up from the drivers, not the tender wheels.

 

I removed the loco shell and added about an ounce of Cerrobend to the boiler dome cavities and the smokebox front. The instructions recommend not removing the shell … and I can see why, it’s too easy to break off parts. Weighing 10.1 oz., she’ll pull 14 cars out of the Great Divide yard and up the slight mainline incline, so that should be fine.

 

I spayed a mix of Vallejo Grimy Black, plus some Reefer White and a couple of drops of Flat Red. After decaling, I air brushed various thinned weathering colors and a dusting of Engine Black soot. Some of the weathering was muted by the over spay of the control coat. I’ll add a little more rust next time I have my airbrush out.

 

I installed a Tsunami2 TSU-2200 decoder, TCS KA-3 Keep Alive and a 9/16” x 1” speaker facing up through the coal load. Front light is a warm 3mm LED, rear is a 3.0 V bulb on 220 Ohm resistor. On a tip from Dave (Dry Gulch & Western RR), I’ll be applying a coat of Model Masters Clear Orange paint to the LED to provide an incandesce glow.

 

I kept the stock clear-view tender because of its great detail, but reserved the right to replace (swap out) the shell with a Tyco/Mantua slope-back. The Tyco plastic shell fits nicely over the stock frame. The cast on Tyco shell frame needs to be trimmed off. I put a connector on the speaker wires, so I think I can swap the shell with very little effort.

 

I did some research a few days ago on the tender shell that John used and discovered … wait for it … a vintage HO Lionel! The GD photos show two vertical lines of rivets at the front, with three rows of horizontal rivets passing through them. No vertical rivets at the rear. The Tyco/Mantua tender has only one vertical line of rivets at the front and two short lines at the rear. Granted, Lionel may have “barrowed” a metal casting from some other mfg. to make the plastic shell; but, my eBay searches turned up nothing similar for: Penn Line, Bowser, Varney, American Flyer or brass.

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Jeffrey L Witt
 

Nice work, Tom!

What's your technique for airbrushing the valve gear and drivers? I assume you have it powered, wheels turning, and use light/almost dry passes?

That's a nice blend - looks hot and dry. I agree that you could go a bit more aggressive with the weathering to get that G&D look, particularly some calcium deposits.

It almost looks like John Pryke's (R.I.P)  technique, and your use of the term "control coat" supports my theory.

Cheers, Jeff


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

Thanks, Jeff.

The drivers and valve gear were already nicely darkened from the factory. Yes, I spayed a thin, almost dry, coat on them. I hit them last with a light "dirt" coat (about 3 pts PollyScale Earth, 1 1/2 pts Reefer Gray & a little Reefer white). I had the boiler shell off, so was able to spin the flywheel with the eraser end of a pencil and moved the drivers 180 degrees). (My HOn3 Blackstone K-27, will be a different story, because I won't be removing that shell!)

Of coarse, the soot dust at the end. I did all of this weathering in one sitting.

Yes, you are right ... Pryke article, but I forgo the templates.

I had the weathering "perfect," but the dirt and control coats muted the colors. I hit it with more rust and it looked good under my desk light ... but not so much on the layout. I used an iPhone 12 Pro, but no fill light.

I think the lesson here is to add heavier weathering. Pryke warns you that the weathering will look garish before you apply the control and dirt coats. I also should have hand brushed some of the vertical rivets with rust.

As a last step, I lightly oiled the valve gear with #5 Nano-Oil. Before painting, wheel axles a drop of Never-stall.

One day, I want to try my hand at brush painting an entire loco with enamels, like John did. Not sure I have the guts to do this on a brass loco, though.

I'll post a "before weathering" photo.

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Randy Lee Decker
 

I have managed to squirrel away some of the engines and tenders I need for the GDLine roster project..   I keep saying I won't have them all but I suppose like you Tom and any of the guy's who have gotten into this..... once you get started and 2 engines completed becomes 6 engines then 7 then 8,  it is inevitable that one would end up throwing in the towel and just try and complete the list. 

Anyway I wanted to say;   I am grateful for the research done by so many of you on the list itself.   I know you have cracked the code on many of his secrets and every person who follows this work (who might want a John Allen replica) will benefit from all this work.     Nice job on #15.  btw; I did find a metal version of that tender.  Has no manufacturers name on it.  I can't see where anyone could ever tell the difference once painted but the weight is nice.  

Randy

       


Jeffrey L Witt
 

I uploaded a PDF of John Pryke's article in case anyone want to ATTEMPT to match Tom's results ;)

https://groups.io/g/GandD/files/John_Pryke_Loco_Weathering.pdf 

Jeff


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

Jeff,

Thanks for the upload of Pryke's article. I scanned it, too ... but yours is way better.

I keep a short list of those paint mixtures in my paint booth drawer. You can brush paint the heavier rust marks and some other colors. I found that the cards left the edges too crisp. Maybe I was just holding the card too close to the body. I also don't have the patience to cut them out.

I taped off the smokebox and used Microscale Micro Mask MI-7 to mask the windows, lamp lenses and bell. The bell cord is dark gray thread and whistle cord is thin brass wire. I drilled a hole in cab and secured the cords with a speck of ACC.

BTW, the Proto 2000 has a nicely detailed interior. It's DCC wiring connection from the loco to the tender deserves an award! Note how closely coupled they are.

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

Thanks, Randy,

Did you find the metal tender version on eBay? I gotta believe that's what John used.

You're right about the GD-repo loco list. I built #42 2-8-2, #9 0-4-0T, #6 Heisler, #12 0-6-0 and #26 UP 2-8-0 before starting construction in 1999 building the final PR layout. I resisted adding GD locos, because the layout took priority. Although, I added decoders to the Docksider, #26 and replaced the Rivarossi Heisler with a newer, all-wheel pick version. (I know ... beat me with a stick ... I worked on some diseasels (sic), too! The AT&SF has trackage rights on the Pine Ridge.)

Now that my layout is more mature, plus I wanted a break from building structures, I started adding to the GD list: #29 2-8-0 last year and this year #42 restored (see upcoming Dec 2020 MHR Running Extra), #12 recreation and now #15.

In the near-term queue are: #27 ATSF 2-8-0 (my first brass loco; I disassembled her over 20 years go), #38 Sierra 2-6-6-2 , #39 CO 2-6-6-2, #40 ATSF 2-8-2, #60 Gas-Electric PFM/Ski based on the D&RGW. All have can motors and a few decoders.

Those of you interested in #40 should know that Broadway LTD has an AT&SF Class 4000 2-8-2 in their futures "Order Now" list. I pre-ordered one in the fall of 2017. What's the hang up? I thought these would be really popular. Haven't they met their pre-order "built-it" number?

That leaves about eight more that I plan to build, plus some non-GD locos. My #36 will be a Denver & Salt Lake 2-6-6-0, #48 Western Pacific T-29 4-6-0, and #56 AT&SF Class 1337 4-6-2. I would love a #101 AT&SF 4-6-4 (John's was a NYC), but too long for my GD turntable. Long locos, like my AT&SF 2-10-2, make the PRRR look too small. I also have plans to letter my 2-10-0 Frisco as Tioga Pass #31.

The PRRR is loco-top heavy, so many will have to get swapped back and forth from the display cabinet. And no, I'm not to join that Locomotives Anonymous group ... useless Dr, Swarner leads it. :)

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Greg Komar
 

Tom, and all,

 

I found: If the vertical slits in the card (I used index cards) were narrower, and the card was held a bit away from the surface, and the airbrush had a narrow spray, the  painted streak would be denser in the center, tapering toward the edges. It had a better look for a better look.  I’ve also used cards with a pair of track gauged slits to duplicate the vertical splatters from spinning wet wheels on the ends of cars, but you have to spray upwards toward the car.

 

Greg Komar

gkomar@...

813-453-0997

“God is subtle, but not malicious. That Nature, though difficult to understnd, ought, at the root, to be simple and beautiful." ~~Albert

From: GandD@groups.io [mailto:GandD@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
Sent: Saturday, December 5, 2020 12:44 PM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] PR #15 USRA 0-8-0 Switcher

 

Jeff,

Thanks for the upload of Pryke's article. I scanned it, too ... but yours is way better.

I keep a short list of those paint mixtures in my paint booth drawer. You can brush paint the heavier rust marks and some other colors. I found that the cards left the edges too crisp. Maybe I was just holding the card too close to the body. I also don't have the patience to cut them out.

I taped off the smokebox and used Microscale Micro Mask MI-7 to mask the windows, lamp lenses and bell. The bell cord is dark gray thread and whistle cord is thin brass wire. I drilled a hole in cab and secured the cords with a speck of ACC.

BTW, the Proto 2000 has a nicely detailed interior. It's DCC wiring connection from the loco to the tender deserves an award! Note how closely coupled they are.

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Charles Kinzer
 

I know weathering is a subjective thing.  But I’ve never cared much for weathering detail attempted with an airbrush as described in that article  It’s certainly not how John Allen did it.  I don’t believe it can get results anything close to John Allen’s.  Some of you probably remember what I call “airbrush tiger stripe weathering” was in vogue where somebody painted an engine black and then with some lighter color airbrushed X number of fat lines with soft edges down the length of the engine and tender.

 

Here is a big 2-page spread photo of an O scale engine from the Nov 61 Model Railroader.  The O scale engine is not John’s, but John did the weathering.  This cannot be achieved with an airbrush.

 

 

Here is an O scale engine I recently sold on somebody’s behalf that used the airbrushed “tiger stripe” technique.  And perhaps a bit better example than most.  At least the painter knew of more than one color and also did overall “dusting” weathering.  But to my eye it just looks like soft airbrushed stripes (which they are) and some of them in inexplicable places.

 

 

Just for fun, here is another O scale engine with a few stripes on the tender (perhaps an unfinished bar code marking?) and some truly strange spattered paint weathering.

 

 

Here’s a close up of that “spatter” technique.  Pretty odd looking.

 

 

Finally, I have attached one photo (because for some reason it wouldn’t insert except at ludicrous low resolution – I don’t know why that happens) of my first attempt at weathering an engine when I was about 16 years old.  I was absolutely influenced by John Allen.  I know it’s not great and some of its weathering may not make sense, but other than the basic painting of the model with a lightened and warmed John Allen black, it is all by brush.  I think it would have been VERY hard to get effective results doing detail weathering with an airbrush, especially on something as small as this HO 2-4-4 Forney (and yes, it is a Diamond Models one but I amped up the detailing a bit.)  Note:  Photo tone probably warmer then in person.  (Kodachrome with incandescent lighting.)

 

Charles E. “Chuck” Kinzer

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
Sent: Saturday, December 5, 2020 9:43 AM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] PR #15 USRA 0-8-0 Switcher

 

Jeff,

Thanks for the upload of Pryke's article. I scanned it, too ... but yours is way better.

I keep a short list of those paint mixtures in my paint booth drawer. You can brush paint the heavier rust marks and some other colors. I found that the cards left the edges too crisp. Maybe I was just holding the card too close to the body. I also don't have the patience to cut them out.

I taped off the smokebox and used Microscale Micro Mask MI-7 to mask the windows, lamp lenses and bell. The bell cord is dark gray thread and whistle cord is thin brass wire. I drilled a hole in cab and secured the cords with a speck of ACC.

BTW, the Proto 2000 has a nicely detailed interior. It's DCC wiring connection from the loco to the tender deserves an award! Note how closely coupled they are.

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR

 


Warner Swarner
 

Hi, I’m Warner, I’m a railroadaholic. 
R A meetings are held regularly on line.
Avoid swap meets and eBay. 
But, If somebody calls we encourage them to buy it but find a good attorney.
LAS  Locomotive Acquisition Syndrome is not a treatable condition.  



On Dec 5, 2020, at 11:19 AM, Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR) <PR-Line@...> wrote:

Thanks, Randy,

Did you find the metal tender version on eBay? I gotta believe that's what John used.

You're right about the GD-repo loco list. I built #42 2-8-2, #9 0-4-0T, #6 Heisler, #12 0-6-0 and #26 UP 2-8-0 before starting construction in 1999 building the final PR layout. I resisted adding GD locos, because the layout took priority. Although, I added decoders to the Docksider, #26 and replaced the Rivarossi Heisler with a newer, all-wheel pick version. (I know ... beat me with a stick ... I worked on some diseasels (sic), too! The AT&SF has trackage rights on the Pine Ridge.)

Now that my layout is more mature, plus I wanted a break from building structures, I started adding to the GD list: #29 2-8-0 last year and this year #42 restored (see upcoming Dec 2020 MHR Running Extra), #12 recreation and now #15.

In the near-term queue are: #27 ATSF 2-8-0 (my first brass loco; I disassembled her over 20 years go), #38 Sierra 2-6-6-2 , #39 CO 2-6-6-2, #40 ATSF 2-8-2, #60 Gas-Electric PFM/Ski based on the D&RGW. All have can motors and a few decoders.

Those of you interested in #40 should know that Broadway LTD has an AT&SF Class 4000 2-8-2 in their futures "Order Now" list. I pre-ordered one in the fall of 2017. What's the hang up? I thought these would be really popular. Haven't they met their pre-order "built-it" number?

That leaves about eight more that I plan to build, plus some non-GD locos. My #36 will be a Denver & Salt Lake 2-6-6-0, #48 Western Pacific T-29 4-6-0, and #56 AT&SF Class 1337 4-6-2. I would love a #101 AT&SF 4-6-4 (John's was a NYC), but too long for my GD turntable. Long locos, like my AT&SF 2-10-2, make the PRRR look too small. I also have plans to letter my 2-10-0 Frisco as Tioga Pass #31.

The PRRR is loco-top heavy, so many will have to get swapped back and forth from the display cabinet. And no, I'm not to join that Locomotives Anonymous group ... useless Dr, Swarner leads it. :)

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

Hi, I'm Tom, I'm a railroadaholic, too.

I'm kind of glad hear that LAS is not treatable. My attorney friend, Dave G., just retired and won't take my case. He suffers from the same thing, so I'll invite him to our next R A meeting.

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR