Topics

Ore loads to coal loads?


Don Mitchell <donm@...>
 

John's mine buggy was equipped with magnets that rotated the load 180 degrees.  The load filled the buggy going up into the mine entrance, the load was flipped automatically, and the buggy came down with an empty load.  The process was reversed in the structure that "unloaded" the buggy into the rail car.

Scaling the size up and changing the simulated load from ore to coal might be one way of modeling coal usage in steam loco operation.

Don M.


Russell Courtenay
 

Interesting, any photos of this? I guess I’d never heard of this one...


On Jun 26, 2019, at 6:01 PM, Don Mitchell <donm@...> wrote:

John's mine buggy was equipped with magnets that rotated the load 180 degrees.  The load filled the buggy going up into the mine entrance, the load was flipped automatically, and the buggy came down with an empty load.  The process was reversed in the structure that "unloaded" the buggy into the rail car.

Scaling the size up and changing the simulated load from ore to coal might be one way of modeling coal usage in steam loco operation.

Don M.


Robert Purcell
 

In the summer of 1970, when I visited the G&D, I spent a long time trying to see that flip of the ore car.  It was instantaneous.  I wish that I had spent more time looking at the roundhouse at Great Divide.  My wife had done that and told me after that it was wonderful.  Also, I wish that I has looked at Cold Shoulder longer.  When we left, I felt exhausted.  There was an awful lot to take in.  John was a marvelous host. 
Rob Purcell


On Wed, Jun 26, 2019 at 8:46 PM Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Interesting, any photos of this? I guess I’d never heard of this one...


On Jun 26, 2019, at 6:01 PM, Don Mitchell <donm@...> wrote:

John's mine buggy was equipped with magnets that rotated the load 180 degrees.  The load filled the buggy going up into the mine entrance, the load was flipped automatically, and the buggy came down with an empty load.  The process was reversed in the structure that "unloaded" the buggy into the rail car.

Scaling the size up and changing the simulated load from ore to coal might be one way of modeling coal usage in steam loco operation.

Don M.


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

John used magnets to flip the entire tiny car of its load and a mechanism to refill it inside the mine.  John also had the pulley system simulate a slower moving car loaded and a faster moving car after empty. What a clever, clever man. 
 
   So with that in mind It seems possible that one could find a magnetic material and paint it black (if it's not already) perhaps half the load.... and remove some of this coal as an engine goes through a tunnel or under a structure, using a simple magnet mounted overhead and some clever way this magnet can be scrapped and dumped inside the building into a bin.   Then refill with this magnetic coal.... right at the coal tower before every run.   Not sure if you could control it to take small amounts.  Seems like this would be all or nothing but it would make people wonder where the coal went as they would never see when or where this happened.   

Love those John Allen stories.  Rob, looking back on any day that anyone might have spent at John's place, I don't think would anyone feel they spent enough time looking at anything.  What you witnessed puts you in such a rare group of people and I tip my hat to ya in checking out the mine tipple.  Did you happen to try and take any photographs?   I have some drawings that I am doing to recreate that cute, little, fascinating feature. That is one of the things I have to have right.   John's electro-mechanical ingenuity was "cutting edge" for the 1950's and 60's.  He could have worked for Disney World and been one of the best there. 

Johns birthday is almost on us, please raise a toast or a pancake to his memory on the 2nd. 
     
Randy     


 

Perhaps an electromagnet which when energized would lift the coal out of the car?


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Ahhhh, I think that's what I just spent all that time typing about....  Russ.      LOL 

Randy 


Charles Kinzer
 

You can get “steel shot abrasive blasting media” in various sizes.  It’s about $100 for a 50 lb. bag but you can find smaller quantities if you look.  Or in 55 gallon drums.  You can also get it in other shapes such as “steel grit” which is a more random shaped thing.

 

However, I recommend AGAINST having this stuff loose around a model railroad layout.  These fine granules can easily fine their way into the magnetic fields of motors.

 

But it might have utility if bonded into large chunks, or a single large piece.

 

I am familiar with this because I’m the creator of the very little known product “Anita’s Own – Heavier Stuff – Pourable Weight” available only at Central Coast Trains in Atascadero, CA.  (Anita is the store owner.)

 

Here is a closeup of what “Anita’s Own” looks like (a blend of two sizes of steel shot).  It is meant to be fixed in place with CA or epoxy or something to add weight.  NEVER loose.  (This is a photo of a proprietary mixture developed after lengthy scientific-like research at my extensive testing laboratory facility.)

 

 

 

The English company Deluxe Materials has “Liquid Gravity” which is a similar product.  It costs more, is less dense, and you get fewer grams than with “Anita’s Own”.

 

 

Charles E. “Chuck” Kinzer

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Russ Desmond via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2019 5:41 AM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] Ore loads to coal loads?

 

Perhaps an electromagnet which when energized would lift the coal out of the car?

_._,_._,_

 


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

I was thinking of Magnetite, it is black and can be crushed into a convincing coal load easily enough.  But you make a super good point Don; having any material like this around and it is inevitable that it will invade your drive systems at some time.   

Randy   


 

Miniature taconite pellets! Paint them rust color and back to work on the Edmund Fitzgerald cutaway model.


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

er;   super good point Charles....