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John Allen and DCC - was Anyone remember a basic overview of the D G Line Blocks?


Kurt Youngmann
 

My guess is that John would have welcomed DCC because it would have made ops smoother. According to what Linn Westcott wrote in The Book, a constant worry was that operators would forget to throw block toggles - whether to give them power to use a block or to turn one off after leaving it.

We know that he refused to switch to Kadee couplers because he was perfectly satisfied with how the Bakers worked. It reminds me of the old Will Rogers quote: “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Unrelated to operations, we also know that he was experimenting with sound toward the end. The last time I visited (November, ’72) he demonstrated it for me.

Probably his only objection to switching to DCC would have been the expense due to his frugal nature. But the added ease of running the railroad would have been reason enough to pop for whatever it cost. 

Kurt Youngmann


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“We must, however, acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities…still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." - Charles Darwin



Russell Courtenay
 

I was hoping you would chime in here Kurt, I always appreciate your whimsical view of operations on the G&D. 

So, if you did much operating there, were there markers or landmarks one could watch for to make sure you were still in your block? Yard limit signs? Certain crossovers or sidings that indicate ‘end of block’?

Maybe some of these appeared in photos over the years like the tabs that often got left on cars in scenic photos?

Russell Courtenay
Solemnity and profundity are sublime in inequity. 


On Aug 18, 2020, at 5:10 PM, Kurt Youngmann <tgobbi@...> wrote:

My guess is that John would have welcomed DCC because it would have made ops smoother. According to what Linn Westcott wrote in The Book, a constant worry was that operators would forget to throw block toggles - whether to give them power to use a block or to turn one off after leaving it.

We know that he refused to switch to Kadee couplers because he was perfectly satisfied with how the Bakers worked. It reminds me of the old Will Rogers quote: “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Unrelated to operations, we also know that he was experimenting with sound toward the end. The last time I visited (November, ’72) he demonstrated it for me.

Probably his only objection to switching to DCC would have been the expense due to his frugal nature. But the added ease of running the railroad would have been reason enough to pop for whatever it cost. 

Kurt Youngmann


***

“We must, however, acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities…still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." - Charles Darwin



Randy Lee Decker
 

I am sure I can find some of the cuts in the track and yes I would think there would be some markers.  But I know some of those guy's ran so many trains they'd almost be able to close their eyes and think back about it and I bet they'd remember....   I'll have to do my own sections on the High Bridge when its done anyway, but I was curious about how he might have separated the tracks at port and up the hill or out to Gorre... etc.  would be fun to have this fairly accurate. 

Randy     


Kurt Youngmann
 

Some time ago, before some of the newer participants on this forum joined us, I made a point of stating that I did very little operating on the G & D.

I was at Fort Ord during the spring and summer of 1961 and John invited me to participate but I was a virgin at operating a railroad and couldn’t get the hang of the controls so I spent 2 or 3 evenings at the Great Divide engine terminal. That was it, other than my abortive attempt at solving the Timesaver as I explained a few days ago. Disappointing, but true.

As far as blocks, markers, etc. - I remember very little. Mostly I was in awe of my surroundings. Even as early as ’61 enough of the railroad had been built that one couldn’t take it all in in such a short time. When I returned 11 years later, in the middle of a session, the growth was so overwhelming that it took my breath away. But I never ran anything after ’61.

Kurt Youngmann

On Aug 18, 2020, at 7:07 PM, Russell Courtenay via groups.io <walruswebtech@...> wrote:

So, if you did much operating there, were there markers or landmarks one could watch for to make sure you were still in your block? Yard limit signs? Certain crossovers or sidings that indicate ‘end of block’?


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"Most institutions demand unqualified faith; but the institution of science makes skepticism a virtue." - Robert King Merton, sociologist (1910-2003)