Topics

Corsa


Don Mitchell <donm@...>
 

Bill Corsa was John's #1 local helper when I got to the G&D in 1962.  Bill owned a Sierra 2-6-6-2 (?) that was a mainstay of operations at that time.  My memory is faint, but I think Bill worked for or owned one of the local auto shops, and that at sometime he moved away to another location in the Bay Area.

At the end, Al Fenton was the #1 local helper.

Don M.


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

Thank you, Don. The name Bill Corsa does ring a bell.

I also vaguely recall that Dave Cooper posted a few messages on the G&D Group years ago. Either that or someone was writing about him. I remember that he was living in Florida. I'll have to do some searching later. He might have still been listed as a member.

--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

I remember seeing a photo of a Western Sierra RR? 2-6-6-2 at Squawbottom. That was probably Bill’s. 
--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Kurt Youngmann
 

As I’ve mentioned before, I met Allan Fenton at my next-to-last visit to the G & D. In early summer 1972 I was in Monterey for just a day and called John to see if there was a chance of seeing him and the railroad. I hadn’t been there since the fall of ’61 and, of course, he didn’t remember me but, always cordial, he invited me to come during his regular Tuesday evening ops session. So that’s when I met all of the members of the final G & D crew: the only others I remember are Perry Jenkins, Darryl Harbin and Joe Cain. So much had changed on the railroad since my previous visit 11 years earlier that it was like seeing it for the first time. Perhaps the biggest change was the growth of Great Divide / Port urban area which now looked like a major metropolitan conglomerate. Scenery had progressed by a huge amount as well and more buildings were everywhere. Andrews was just about complete.

The 1974 NMRA convention was held in San Diego which was convenient for me since I was living in Los Angeles at the time. I was happy to see that the G & D operators had a booth there and it was a great pleasure to chat with them all. Allan and I formed a quick friendship and, as I’ve mentioned, I saw him often on trips to Monterey where I had an elderly aunt who required assistance with banking, medical appointments and the other things that older people have to take care of. (I can attest to that these many years later now that I’m an old people myself <G>.

I contacted Allan every trip and was always welcomed warmly by him and his wife, Barbara. He was working for either BirdsEye or Del Monte frozen foods (memory lapse on my part) as their broccoli buyer and he always had the fresh product on hand which he generously shared with me for my aunt to make soup. There was usually model railroad activity going on and he always took me along to see various layouts, including the local club called the Monterey and Salinas Valley RR. There had been a real railroad of that name in the late 19th century, a narrow-gauge line that the SP wanted. So, as was often the case, they stole it at gunpoint. (That’s not exactly what happened, but… close enough). For anyone interested in the history: <https://www.santacruztrains.com/2016/04/monterey-salinas-valley-railroad.html>. I even got a couple sets of the club’s decals and had two MSV cars on my own layout. There’s also a MSV museum: <http://salinasrailroadmuseum.org>

One year, when I was planning a trip to see my aunt, I saw Andy Sperandeo at a hobby show and mentioned to him that I was looking forward to seeing Allan. Imagine my shock when he told me that Allan had died a few weeks earlier on a trip to Alaska!

I hope these trips down memory lane aren’t boring to you all but I get a kick out of sharing them.

Kurt Youngmann

On Aug 1, 2019, at 10:28 PM, Don Mitchell <donm@...> wrote:

At the end, Al Fenton was the #1 local helper.


"I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when you looked at it in the right way, did not become still more complicated." - Poul Anderson


Russell Courtenay
 

Great stories Kurt!

It’s OK where there are memory gaps, we all have them, some are more interesting than others!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 2, 2019, at 11:44 AM, Kurt Youngmann <tgobbi@...> wrote:

As I’ve mentioned before, I met Allan Fenton at my next-to-last visit to the G & D. In early summer 1972 I was in Monterey for just a day and called John to see if there was a chance of seeing him and the railroad. I hadn’t been there since the fall of ’61 and, of course, he didn’t remember me but, always cordial, he invited me to come during his regular Tuesday evening ops session. So that’s when I met all of the members of the final G & D crew: the only others I remember are Perry Jenkins, Darryl Harbin and Joe Cain. So much had changed on the railroad since my previous visit 11 years earlier that it was like seeing it for the first time. Perhaps the biggest change was the growth of Great Divide / Port urban area which now looked like a major metropolitan conglomerate. Scenery had progressed by a huge amount as well and more buildings were everywhere. Andrews was just about complete.

The 1974 NMRA convention was held in San Diego which was convenient for me since I was living in Los Angeles at the time. I was happy to see that the G & D operators had a booth there and it was a great pleasure to chat with them all. Allan and I formed a quick friendship and, as I’ve mentioned, I saw him often on trips to Monterey where I had an elderly aunt who required assistance with banking, medical appointments and the other things that older people have to take care of. (I can attest to that these many years later now that I’m an old people myself <G>.

I contacted Allan every trip and was always welcomed warmly by him and his wife, Barbara. He was working for either BirdsEye or Del Monte frozen foods (memory lapse on my part) as their broccoli buyer and he always had the fresh product on hand which he generously shared with me for my aunt to make soup. There was usually model railroad activity going on and he always took me along to see various layouts, including the local club called the Monterey and Salinas Valley RR. There had been a real railroad of that name in the late 19th century, a narrow-gauge line that the SP wanted. So, as was often the case, they stole it at gunpoint. (That’s not exactly what happened, but… close enough). For anyone interested in the history: <https://www.santacruztrains.com/2016/04/monterey-salinas-valley-railroad.html>. I even got a couple sets of the club’s decals and had two MSV cars on my own layout. There’s also a MSV museum: <http://salinasrailroadmuseum.org>

One year, when I was planning a trip to see my aunt, I saw Andy Sperandeo at a hobby show and mentioned to him that I was looking forward to seeing Allan. Imagine my shock when he told me that Allan had died a few weeks earlier on a trip to Alaska!

I hope these trips down memory lane aren’t boring to you all but I get a kick out of sharing them.

Kurt Youngmann

On Aug 1, 2019, at 10:28 PM, Don Mitchell <donm@...> wrote:

At the end, Al Fenton was the #1 local helper.


"I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when you looked at it in the right way, did not become still more complicated." - Poul Anderson


Gregg Tivnan
 


<snip>


On Friday, August 2, 2019, 12:44:05 PM CDT, Kurt Youngmann <tgobbi@...> wrote:

I hope these trips down memory lane aren’t boring to you all but I get a kick out of sharing them.

Kurt Youngmann
.......................................................................

If this is your idea of boring, keep being boring.


These memories bring the past to life. Thank you.

Gregg


Kurt Youngmann
 

I dunno how old you are, Russell, but lemme tell ya: the gaps get worse, longer and more frequent as the years go by!!!

But seriously, these memories are among the treasures of my lifetime. I feel fortunate to have seen the G & D and to have met the Wizard those few times all those years ago. The first time I walked into the layout room is indelibly etched in my head. As you know, John was a showman par excellence and he was ready for me when I rang the doorbell and went downstairs. The lights were turned off in the room and he waited until just the exact second to turn them on. The view of Port / Great Divide, as early on as it was, simply made my jaw drop open. The roundhouse was the immediate sight; then came the bridge with the “painting crew” at work. And walking into Giant Canyon was an incredible experience as well. I had never imagined, let alone seen, scenery that went down to the floor and that you could walk in. Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry had (still has, but in a rebuilt version), a very large, well-scenicked O scale railroad but it paled in comparison. It wasn’t (still isn’t) what we think of as an operating road - just trains running around in huge circles.

Which brings up the topic of operations. Almost invariably, when we mention our hobby to (for want of a better term) outsiders, their first comments refer to the Lionel or American Flyer train sets many of us grew up with. They don’t even know what real railroads do, which is to move goods and people linearly from one place to another. So they don’t understand a model railroad that tries to emulate that. The concept is basically foreign to the average guy. My own SKP lines, now long gone, filled a roughly 30’ X 35’ basement; it ran around the wall and had several peninsulas to extend the length of the main line and was run point-to-point. One day a non-railroad guest asked if he could see it. So down we went and I powered up to run a train. My guest, pointing, asked, “Can you get the train from this table to that table?” I responded: “This table IS that table!!!” Of course, in the early days of the hobby, even guys who were interested in ops built tabletop layouts. John was a pioneer, along with John Armstrong and a few others, in the around-the-wall, walk-in concept. I believe even Frank Ellison’s Delta Lines was a table in the middle of a room.

One other quick anecdote: the furnace repairman came to service our unit. It was late fall, not too long before Christmas. He took a look around and said, “Hey, this is great! Do you put it up every year?"

Kurt Youngmann

On Aug 2, 2019, at 12:56 PM, Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech@...> wrote:

It’s OK where there are memory gaps, we all have them, some are more interesting than


“A word to the wise is not sufficient if it doesn’t make sense." - James Thurber



Tom Milam
 

Kurt,

No, keep telling stories, it is this that keeps the G&D alive.

I met Allan years ago when I took over Timesaver switching contest were I was active in the PCR. It was a great time operating the switching contest during the quarterly meets. My own best time was 2 minutes and 56 seconds, my 8 year old son Seth, beat my time regularly. He still does I built a snap track version about  the same time and just last visit to him in Colorado he beat my times over and over, though he is 37 now. 

Thanks for the memory

Tom Milam


-----Original Message-----
From: Kurt Youngmann <tgobbi@...>
To: GandD <GandD@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Aug 2, 2019 10:44 am
Subject: Re: [GandD] Corsa

As I’ve mentioned before, I met Allan Fenton at my next-to-last visit to the G & D. In early summer 1972 I was in Monterey for just a day and called John to see if there was a chance of seeing him and the railroad. I hadn’t been there since the fall of ’61 and, of course, he didn’t remember me but, always cordial, he invited me to come during his regular Tuesday evening ops session. So that’s when I met all of the members of the final G & D crew: the only others I remember are Perry Jenkins, Darryl Harbin and Joe Cain. So much had changed on the railroad since my previous visit 11 years earlier that it was like seeing it for the first time. Perhaps the biggest change was the growth of Great Divide / Port urban area which now looked like a major metropolitan conglomerate. Scenery had progressed by a huge amount as well and more buildings were everywhere. Andrews was just about complete.

The 1974 NMRA convention was held in San Diego which was convenient for me since I was living in Los Angeles at the time. I was happy to see that the G & D operators had a booth there and it was a great pleasure to chat with them all. Allan and I formed a quick friendship and, as I’ve mentioned, I saw him often on trips to Monterey where I had an elderly aunt who required assistance with banking, medical appointments and the other things that older people have to take care of. (I can attest to that these many years later now that I’m an old people myself <G>.

I contacted Allan every trip and was always welcomed warmly by him and his wife, Barbara. He was working for either BirdsEye or Del Monte frozen foods (memory lapse on my part) as their broccoli buyer and he always had the fresh product on hand which he generously shared with me for my aunt to make soup. There was usually model railroad activity going on and he always took me along to see various layouts, including the local club called the Monterey and Salinas Valley RR. There had been a real railroad of that name in the late 19th century, a narrow-gauge line that the SP wanted. So, as was often the case, they stole it at gunpoint. (That’s not exactly what happened, but… close enough). For anyone interested in the history: <https://www.santacruztrains.com/2016/04/monterey-salinas-valley-railroad.html>. I even got a couple sets of the club’s decals and had two MSV cars on my own layout. There’s also a MSV museum: <http://salinasrailroadmuseum.org>

One year, when I was planning a trip to see my aunt, I saw Andy Sperandeo at a hobby show and mentioned to him that I was looking forward to seeing Allan. Imagine my shock when he told me that Allan had died a few weeks earlier on a trip to Alaska!

I hope these trips down memory lane aren’t boring to you all but I get a kick out of sharing them.

Kurt Youngmann

On Aug 1, 2019, at 10:28 PM, Don Mitchell <donm@...> wrote:

At the end, Al Fenton was the #1 local helper.


"I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when you looked at it in the right way, did not become still more complicated." - Poul Anderson


Russell Courtenay
 

I guess if your grown kids are going to beat you, the Timesaver is the way!

Thanks for your stories too!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Aug 2, 2019, at 10:05 PM, Tom Milam via Groups.Io <ncngrr@...> wrote:

Kurt,

No, keep telling stories, it is this that keeps the G&D alive.

I met Allan years ago when I took over Timesaver switching contest were I was active in the PCR. It was a great time operating the switching contest during the quarterly meets. My own best time was 2 minutes and 56 seconds, my 8 year old son Seth, beat my time regularly. He still does I built a snap track version about  the same time and just last visit to him in Colorado he beat my times over and over, though he is 37 now. 

Thanks for the memory

Tom Milam


-----Original Message-----
From: Kurt Youngmann <tgobbi@...>
To: GandD <GandD@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Aug 2, 2019 10:44 am
Subject: Re: [GandD] Corsa

As I’ve mentioned before, I met Allan Fenton at my next-to-last visit to the G & D. In early summer 1972 I was in Monterey for just a day and called John to see if there was a chance of seeing him and the railroad. I hadn’t been there since the fall of ’61 and, of course, he didn’t remember me but, always cordial, he invited me to come during his regular Tuesday evening ops session. So that’s when I met all of the members of the final G & D crew: the only others I remember are Perry Jenkins, Darryl Harbin and Joe Cain. So much had changed on the railroad since my previous visit 11 years earlier that it was like seeing it for the first time. Perhaps the biggest change was the growth of Great Divide / Port urban area which now looked like a major metropolitan conglomerate. Scenery had progressed by a huge amount as well and more buildings were everywhere. Andrews was just about complete.

The 1974 NMRA convention was held in San Diego which was convenient for me since I was living in Los Angeles at the time. I was happy to see that the G & D operators had a booth there and it was a great pleasure to chat with them all. Allan and I formed a quick friendship and, as I’ve mentioned, I saw him often on trips to Monterey where I had an elderly aunt who required assistance with banking, medical appointments and the other things that older people have to take care of. (I can attest to that these many years later now that I’m an old people myself <G>.

I contacted Allan every trip and was always welcomed warmly by him and his wife, Barbara. He was working for either BirdsEye or Del Monte frozen foods (memory lapse on my part) as their broccoli buyer and he always had the fresh product on hand which he generously shared with me for my aunt to make soup. There was usually model railroad activity going on and he always took me along to see various layouts, including the local club called the Monterey and Salinas Valley RR. There had been a real railroad of that name in the late 19th century, a narrow-gauge line that the SP wanted. So, as was often the case, they stole it at gunpoint. (That’s not exactly what happened, but… close enough). For anyone interested in the history: <https://www.santacruztrains.com/2016/04/monterey-salinas-valley-railroad.html>. I even got a couple sets of the club’s decals and had two MSV cars on my own layout. There’s also a MSV museum: <http://salinasrailroadmuseum.org>

One year, when I was planning a trip to see my aunt, I saw Andy Sperandeo at a hobby show and mentioned to him that I was looking forward to seeing Allan. Imagine my shock when he told me that Allan had died a few weeks earlier on a trip to Alaska!

I hope these trips down memory lane aren’t boring to you all but I get a kick out of sharing them.

Kurt Youngmann

On Aug 1, 2019, at 10:28 PM, Don Mitchell <donm@...> wrote:

At the end, Al Fenton was the #1 local helper.


"I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when you looked at it in the right way, did not become still more complicated." - Poul Anderson


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

I figured I had it backwards … Sierra Western .. SW diamond logo. Gary Wernick photo. I've see a black & white of it, too.


--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

I just love that web page...  Jeff has got everything in there somewhere..    I have looked at that photo so many times Tom thinking of the bridge and how it looks so close to Johns Gorre viaduct in style and construction...getting the bridge work in my head...  Wow I stooped counting after 60 and just gave up trying to add it up....... it is said it was over 100. 
  Anyway In all that time looking at the bridge...  I never once noticed the lettering on this engine!   I just instantly dismissed it as one of Johns Sierras...   That is also the little burned building that survived (in some form) the fire.    Does not make sense... that area is right out in the open and closer to the floor but not that low.     

Randy