Topics

A "Sneak Peek" at the latest GDRP project - The Glenn Beier Collection


Jeffrey L Witt
 

Group,

Along with the film I purchased, Randy Decker acquired a number of photos and slides from Glenn Beier's widow. He also invested in a high-end scanner.

After many hours of work by Randy (getting the best possible high resolution scans) and Jeff (correcting and re-touching the scans), we ready to assemble a new gallery.

While that is ongoing, I thought the group would like a preview of our efforts. The links that follow provide that preview.

These files are LARGE and may take a bit to load in your browser. Some are color, some B&W. The B&W have amazing resolution.

There are photos from both G&D #2 (1950 and 1952) and photos from G&D #3 (1958 and 1959), including all of the G&D photos that appeared in Glenn's out-of-print 2004 book "Steam Echoes".

Enjoy for now; expect an announcement in the coming weeks.

Regards, Jeff

The links:
GB_GD2_Overview.jpg

GB_GD3_Squawbottom_Akin_1.jpg

GB_GD3_Gorre_panel.jpg

 


Galen Gallimore
 

Thank you Jeff and Randy!  Sounds like a lot of work and investment of time and money, but wow the results appear to be stellar!  Great job - you are to be commended for this tremendous effort.  And thank you to Glenn for having the camera handy at the time, and to his widow for her willingness to share, and of course to John for creating the masterful subject matter.  Looking forward to what comes next.

Galen


Tom Milam
 

Hi, 
I knew the building seen  later hide a switch machine, but what type of switch machine is that, looks like a motor.
Tom Milam


On Jul 23, 2020, at 2:07 PM, Galen Gallimore <ggallimore@...> wrote:

Thank you Jeff and Randy!  Sounds like a lot of work and investment of time and money, but wow the results appear to be stellar!  Great job - you are to be commended for this tremendous effort.  And thank you to Glenn for having the camera handy at the time, and to his widow for her willingness to share, and of course to John for creating the masterful subject matter.  Looking forward to what comes next.

Galen


wchrysam@...
 

Tom
That is a rotary relay. I am using two on my layout right now and they work really well. I believe they were mostly war (WW2) surplus.
Unlike most machines of today they have a powered and unpowered position- a spring holds a rotating shaft in one position, and when a coil (two, actually one high current throw, one low current hold) energizes, it moves to a second position, @ 45 degrees or so from the non-powered position. Hope I've explained that understandably. The hardest part of using them is concocting a suitable arm to convert the rotary motion to linear with the the right throw length- I like to use a spring mechanism to take up the excess throw.
If you've seen or used wafer contact style switches, (rotary position type) these relays were an electrical way to operate them- of course in only two positions. However since it uses wafers, you can add virtually limitless contacts to them for power routing,signals, etc. in fact one of the contacts (NC) is always used to disengage the high current coil.
So to use them only requires an on-off switch- powered you go one way, no power you go the other.
in the picture you see the boring side of the relay. The wafers are in the other side.along with the linkage. Wish we could see that part!
Sorry for the long winded post- guess I'm a bit of an antique electrical geek!
Walt


John Hutnick
 

I am getting an error message when I select one of these links.


Tom Milam
 

Walt,

Thanks for the information. I wonder if all John’s turnouts were powered with them? 
Can’t say I ever seen the underside. Maybe in the fire photos, I have to look I know there was a photo of the layout in a big pile after he cleared the basement.

Thanks!
Tom Milam


On Jul 24, 2020, at 6:03 AM, wchrysam@... wrote:

Tom
That is a rotary relay. I am using two on my layout right now and they work really well. I believe they were mostly war (WW2) surplus.
Unlike most machines of today they have a powered and unpowered position- a spring holds a rotating shaft in one position, and when a coil (two, actually one high current throw, one low current hold) energizes, it moves to a second position, @ 45 degrees or so from the non-powered position. Hope I've explained that understandably. The hardest part of using them is concocting a suitable arm to convert the rotary motion to linear with the the right throw length- I like to use a spring mechanism to take up the excess throw.
If you've seen or used wafer contact style switches, (rotary position type) these relays were an electrical way to operate them- of course in only two positions. However since it uses wafers, you can add virtually limitless contacts to them for power routing,signals, etc. in fact one of the contacts (NC) is always used to disengage the high current coil.
So to use them only requires an on-off switch- powered you go one way, no power you go the other.
in the picture you see the boring side of the relay. The wafers are in the other side.along with the linkage. Wish we could see that part!
Sorry for the long winded post- guess I'm a bit of an antique electrical geek!
Walt


wchrysam@...
 

Your question got me thinking and I looked at the underside of the existing burned up control panel. It looks like all the main switch switches had only two wires, and so indicate rotaries. 
These relays are a bit smaller than a baseball, and made of metal, so they would have survived, but if blackened by the fire would blend into all the other unrecognizable stuff. I can send a picture of one of mine in service if interested.
By the way I can tell you the "clunk" they produce is quite authoritative, and there is no doubt a switch has been thrown. I remember reading somewhere about the "clunk" of Johns machines.


James Little
 

I also got that, but then I tried a Right click on the mouse and selected "Open in new Window" and they all opened.

JIm Little, MMR


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

Jeff ... thank you for the 'Sneak Peeks" photos and you and Randy for your incredible efforts! This is quite a feat considering all of the years and people that have passed.

Great detail in them. Those two white-faced locos at Gorre were probably Glenn's, One of the best shots of the small buildings at Akin in that Squawbottom photo. I don't ever recall seeing that structure at the top of Devil's Postpile. (Those postpiles are a real freak of nature, aren't they.) Maybe John removed it, but I don't think I've seen it anywhere else on the layout. It could use more of a "forced perspective."

Thanks again, guys!
--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Tom Milam
 

Walt ,
That would be great! Picture that is.
I use NJ twin coil switch machines, built my layout in 1979. Just last year they started to break. Where the piston is connected to the linkage it broke, not one or two but so far ( I removed the layout for my move to Colorado in October 2019) six switch machines broke the same why. Metal fatigue . I am reassembling the layout in a triple deck configuration with two helixes. I am switching to ground throws and blue point switch machines. 
Thanks
We have the best friends in Model Railroading!

Tom


On Jul 24, 2020, at 7:07 PM, Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR) <PR-Line@...> wrote:



Jeff ... thank you for the 'Sneak Peeks" photos and you and Randy for your incredible efforts! This is quite a feat considering all of the years and people that have passed.

Great detail in them. Those two white-faced locos at Gorre were probably Glenn's, One of the best shots of the small buildings at Akin in that Squawbottom photo. I don't ever recall seeing that structure at the top of Devil's Postpile. (Those postpiles are a real freak of nature, aren't they.) Maybe John removed it, but I don't think I've seen it anywhere else on the layout. It could use more of a "forced perspective."

Thanks again, guys!
--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


Jeffrey L Witt
 

One of the slides shows the Devil's Post "Eagle Nest; it didn't last long before it was removed.

http://www.gdlines.org/GDLines/GD_Galleries/The_Slides/Set_01/slides/s1_005_const_unkdate.html


Tom Hokel (Pine Ridge RR)
 

Son-of-a-gun, I missed that after all of these years!

So, was the rock (or ?) on John's chair a practical joke?
--
Tom
<PR> PINE RIDGE RR


wchrysam@...
 

Tom
Here are some photos- it,s not visible but there's a length of wire in the linkage that acts as a spring. Mounted in a Masonite cutout, linkage is brass tube soldered to the shaft. Regular relay is for power routing. (All DC here, with block control- but I do have transistor throttles!)
Seen NJs and PFMs break as you describe. Apparently after so many operations they just give up, and solder repairs don't seem to last too long.
Added one new in box, as a reference, shows contacts. Mine are all 28 VDC. Not sure if all were.
Hope this helps- and you're right great friends in model railroading!
Walt




Loren Martell
 

As I remember the G&D from the pages of MR & RMC & per page 97 map of “ The Book “:

Apparently rather than eliminate Eagles Nest completely when the Third GD was built it was moved from Devils Pole Pile to its final resting place across the isle & towards Andrews.

I always thought “ The Lift “ to Eagles Nest was a genius touch. But the “ Grand PooBah “ was the master of genius touches....

I remember writing John back in the sixties asking John for a G&D Railroad Pass. John was kind enough to write back saying when I had a Pass to exchange, he would be happy to exchange passes with me.

I do regret that I never finished creation of my railroad pass & exchanged with John..... 🥴
Wonder if I still have John’s letter....

Anyone happen to have an extra GD pass or one that they would be willing to part with?

This is a great memorial to one of if not the greatest Model Railroaders of all time.

I still think that a book of all the first hand stories / memories of personal visits that are shared at this site would be a great companion to Lynn Westcott’s “ Model RailRoading with John Allen “.

To have the skills to create such a book....

loren martell
Aloha, OR 97007