Date   
Re: The John Blanchard letters

Bob Friddle
 

Amen brother, and

Thanks,


Bob Friddle



On Jul 9, 2019, at 10:23 AM, Randy Lee Decker via Groups.Io <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

No sacrilege my friend, John Allen's layout was one cool creation. His layout plan alone did more in the space he had than anything I could come up with on my own for my own space here without making a totally unrealistic bunch of hidden stackers and nonsensical destinations for the sake of more mainline. Even then not a lot more track. I have never seen anything quite as magical as what Johns cellar must have been... 
   So any version of his layout or even just a well done scene that is reminiscent of Johns layout is a nice homage to John and it is surprising how many people will actually recognise it.   If you can pull whole sections of John's layout out of your work and your space, and it is what you enjoy doing then smile brotha.. cuz yer model railroading....!  and enjoying the best damned hobby ever invented.  

Randy    
  

On Tue, Jul 9, 2019 at 10:35 AM Bob Friddle <bob.friddle@...> wrote:

That’s been my assumption, and why I developed a three-phase plan, starting with the lower river route to get trains running while I continued to work, then the high bridge route, then the island (shhh, sacrilege follows), although I have not planned to build anything near the actual Gorre track plan, and my thoughts on that have been evolving even more recently…

Bob

 

From: GandD@groups.io [mailto:GandD@groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Lee Decker via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2019 12:10 PM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] The John Blanchard letters

 

https://groups.io/g/GandD/photo/89980/0?p=Taken,,,20,1,0,0    Well fun to speculate....   I was just a bit stunned as I thought Gorre was placed early on..  I am wondering if he had it so the legs were movable for a time...    please take a look at your photo from John in 1957 again Jeff.   The entire gorre mountain feature is nowhere to be seen and the angle the shot was taken from seems to put the cameraman right in Taylor Lake.    I am only fascinated by it as I am dealing with this now and if Gorre was there I'd be in real trouble to get around and work on the yard or even cross junction much less that back wall...   I know it was there...  He moved it from the old house so I am thinking it was still a movable section... in 1957.      Food for thought.     

Randy 

Re: The John Blanchard letters

Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

No sacrilege my friend, John Allen's layout was one cool creation. His layout plan alone did more in the space he had than anything I could come up with on my own for my own space here without making a totally unrealistic bunch of hidden stackers and nonsensical destinations for the sake of more mainline. Even then not a lot more track. I have never seen anything quite as magical as what Johns cellar must have been... 
   So any version of his layout or even just a well done scene that is reminiscent of Johns layout is a nice homage to John and it is surprising how many people will actually recognise it.   If you can pull whole sections of John's layout out of your work and your space, and it is what you enjoy doing then smile brotha.. cuz yer model railroading....!  and enjoying the best damned hobby ever invented.  

Randy    
  


On Tue, Jul 9, 2019 at 10:35 AM Bob Friddle <bob.friddle@...> wrote:

That’s been my assumption, and why I developed a three-phase plan, starting with the lower river route to get trains running while I continued to work, then the high bridge route, then the island (shhh, sacrilege follows), although I have not planned to build anything near the actual Gorre track plan, and my thoughts on that have been evolving even more recently…

Bob

 

From: GandD@groups.io [mailto:GandD@groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Lee Decker via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2019 12:10 PM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] The John Blanchard letters

 

https://groups.io/g/GandD/photo/89980/0?p=Taken,,,20,1,0,0    Well fun to speculate....   I was just a bit stunned as I thought Gorre was placed early on..  I am wondering if he had it so the legs were movable for a time...    please take a look at your photo from John in 1957 again Jeff.   The entire gorre mountain feature is nowhere to be seen and the angle the shot was taken from seems to put the cameraman right in Taylor Lake.    I am only fascinated by it as I am dealing with this now and if Gorre was there I'd be in real trouble to get around and work on the yard or even cross junction much less that back wall...   I know it was there...  He moved it from the old house so I am thinking it was still a movable section... in 1957.      Food for thought.     

Randy 

Re: The John Blanchard letters

Bob Friddle
 

That’s been my assumption, and why I developed a three-phase plan, starting with the lower river route to get trains running while I continued to work, then the high bridge route, then the island (shhh, sacrilege follows), although I have not planned to build anything near the actual Gorre track plan, and my thoughts on that have been evolving even more recently…

Bob

 

From: GandD@groups.io [mailto:GandD@groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Lee Decker via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2019 12:10 PM
To: GandD@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GandD] The John Blanchard letters

 

https://groups.io/g/GandD/photo/89980/0?p=Taken,,,20,1,0,0    Well fun to speculate....   I was just a bit stunned as I thought Gorre was placed early on..  I am wondering if he had it so the legs were movable for a time...    please take a look at your photo from John in 1957 again Jeff.   The entire gorre mountain feature is nowhere to be seen and the angle the shot was taken from seems to put the cameraman right in Taylor Lake.    I am only fascinated by it as I am dealing with this now and if Gorre was there I'd be in real trouble to get around and work on the yard or even cross junction much less that back wall...   I know it was there...  He moved it from the old house so I am thinking it was still a movable section... in 1957.      Food for thought.     

Randy 

Re: Did someone mention an NMRA clinic?

Russell Courtenay
 

I tried it on the YouTube app and on the phone browser and it worked fine, I will try it on my computer if I can get the kid’s stuff out from in front of it. 

Try this link too David:

On Jul 6, 2019, at 9:26 AM, David Woodrell <dwoodrell@...> wrote:

I continually get an "error has occurred - please try again later" (or words to that effect) when I try to view your YouTube video link.

Dave

Re: Paint

Russell Courtenay
 

Thanks for the overview Kurt,

I haven’t really considered myself old, though I stopped at Taco Bell for a snack a couple months ago and the girl asked kindly, ‘sir, do you get a senior discount?’, I thought a second and said, ‘why, yes I do, thank you!’

But it seems every time I get hurt or sick, I recover a little bit slower and feel a little bit older and less able to do things afterward, I guess what I have to look forward to is more-of-same...

I do O scale but haven’t gotten a layout to the scenery stage in many years. I have plans though, even have almost enough materials to start on a loop in my 12x18’ barn to make use of 2 started sections of my proposed 7-section layout! It will include a narrowed version of the original G&D, if plans proceed!

Russell Courtenay
July is national what month?

On Jul 8, 2019, at 3:50 PM, Kurt Youngmann <tgobbi@...> wrote:

Alas, no. We never got to the point of adding any scenery so no photos. We did have ops sessions, though, requiring about 15 operators.

I have to attribute all the credit to Art. I’m not much of a builder (understatement!) and I was lucky to find him. He did most of the building and electrical work. Without him there would have been no SKP. We remained very good friends.

My original intent was to model a fictitious fully-owned subsidiary of the CNW that went from Skokie, IL to Northern Wisconsin. I grew up very close to the CNW Milwaukee division on Chicago’s North Side and was always fascinated by the trains -  especially steam locomotives which ran until the spring of 1956. Until that time all the commuter trains were still headed by various class E 4-6-2s. Figuring I’d never have as much space as I ultimately wound up with, I decided to model the 1920s with shorter equipment which would give me the chance to run more cars per train. (36’ freight cars were the norm and, fortunately Roundhouse / MDC had a huge catalog of them). It turned out that I had unwittingly pretty much modeled the Chicago, St. Paul Minneapolis & Omaha (CMO) which actually was a fully-owned CNW subsidiary (incorporated into the parent road in the late 50s). At the time I started building I lived in Skokie, IL which was on a CNW branch. SPK stood for “Skokie Pokey Lines” - don’t ask! Even though I had gone to summer camp in Hayward, WI, which was on the CMO, I never knew that it existed as a separate entity. Spooner, just south of Hayward, was the center of my road. Spooner was the stop just before Hayward and was a major junction and, I believe, division point. We rode in 3 old leased Pullman cars that were added to a regularly scheduled train out of Chicago’s CNW station. It was double-headed by a pair of Pacifics. (As much as I’ve tried to figure out exactly what train it was, I’ve been unsuccessful. Originally I thought it might have been the Duluth-Superior Limited but the schedule doesn’t match). My layout had Chicago staging at one end and Minneapolis staging at the other, with other staging areas in between. Hayward was the last town before Minneapolis staging.

If I had it to do all over again (given youth, building skills, money and space and, of course, Art) I’d have intentionally built the Omaha in the earliest post-steam era. There are several reasons for this, mostly because diesel locos are much easier to maintain and have greater pulling capacity than steam. Steam was, and still is, king for me but I developed a late-in-life sense of logic and proportion. 

Kurt (older and wiser) Youngmann

On Jul 8, 2019, at 3:29 PM, Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech@...> wrote:

Are there photos of you former layout around on the web? I’d love to see it.


“Just when I discovered the meaning of life, they changed it.” - George Carlin

Re: Paint

Kurt Youngmann
 

Alas, no. We never got to the point of adding any scenery so no photos. We did have ops sessions, though, requiring about 15 operators.

I have to attribute all the credit to Art. I’m not much of a builder (understatement!) and I was lucky to find him. He did most of the building and electrical work. Without him there would have been no SKP. We remained very good friends.

My original intent was to model a fictitious fully-owned subsidiary of the CNW that went from Skokie, IL to Northern Wisconsin. I grew up very close to the CNW Milwaukee division on Chicago’s North Side and was always fascinated by the trains -  especially steam locomotives which ran until the spring of 1956. Until that time all the commuter trains were still headed by various class E 4-6-2s. Figuring I’d never have as much space as I ultimately wound up with, I decided to model the 1920s with shorter equipment which would give me the chance to run more cars per train. (36’ freight cars were the norm and, fortunately Roundhouse / MDC had a huge catalog of them). It turned out that I had unwittingly pretty much modeled the Chicago, St. Paul Minneapolis & Omaha (CMO) which actually was a fully-owned CNW subsidiary (incorporated into the parent road in the late 50s). At the time I started building I lived in Skokie, IL which was on a CNW branch. SPK stood for “Skokie Pokey Lines” - don’t ask! Even though I had gone to summer camp in Hayward, WI, which was on the CMO, I never knew that it existed as a separate entity. Spooner, just south of Hayward, was the center of my road. Spooner was the stop just before Hayward and was a major junction and, I believe, division point. We rode in 3 old leased Pullman cars that were added to a regularly scheduled train out of Chicago’s CNW station. It was double-headed by a pair of Pacifics. (As much as I’ve tried to figure out exactly what train it was, I’ve been unsuccessful. Originally I thought it might have been the Duluth-Superior Limited but the schedule doesn’t match). My layout had Chicago staging at one end and Minneapolis staging at the other, with other staging areas in between. Hayward was the last town before Minneapolis staging.

If I had it to do all over again (given youth, building skills, money and space and, of course, Art) I’d have intentionally built the Omaha in the earliest post-steam era. There are several reasons for this, mostly because diesel locos are much easier to maintain and have greater pulling capacity than steam. Steam was, and still is, king for me but I developed a late-in-life sense of logic and proportion. 

Kurt (older and wiser) Youngmann

On Jul 8, 2019, at 3:29 PM, Russell Courtenay via Groups.Io <walruswebtech@...> wrote:

Are there photos of you former layout around on the web? I’d love to see it.


“Just when I discovered the meaning of life, they changed it.” - George Carlin

Re: Paint

Russell Courtenay
 

Great story Kurt!

Are there photos of you former layout around on the web? I’d love to see it.

Russell Courtenay
July is national WHAT month?
tinyurl.com/julybeans


On Jul 8, 2019, at 2:12 PM, Kurt Youngmann <tgobbi@...> wrote:

Good! It’s always reassuring to discover that my memory still works, at least occasionally.

The tank car in the photo is obviously a Varney - no surprise since John was their spokesperson for a number of years. I had 2 of those cars when I still had my SKP Lines; both have found a new home on my friend Art’s layout since I dismantled mine. I'm pretty sure they didn’t represent a specific prototype car but they had great proportions and looked like they could have existed. If any of you who model HO ever find one at a flea market, it’s worth buying if it fits your era.

Which reminds me of an anecdote about “the whistling tank car” when I still had my railroad. (I may have told this one before, but here it is again just in case):

Tuesday was work day on the SKP. Art came over every week and occasionally another friend, Jim, joined us. Jim isn’t a model railroader but he showed up for a bit of helping out. One day we powered up the railroad and were greeted by a dead short. It was driving us nuts trying to find it. We walked all around several times (it was a big layout, about 30’ X 35’, three times around the basement with more than 700 freight and 100 passenger cars. We couldn’t find the source of the short and were using a lot of words our mommies had told us never to say (which is OK because John used them all the time)! Finally, Jim, at the far end from where Art & I were standing and cussing, piped up, “Is this tank car supposed to be whistling?” We walked over and, sure enough, an Athearn 3-dome Texaco tank car (the first car I had ever purchased) was making a shrill sound. Ad soon as we lifted it off the track, the power went on.

So, what had happened, you may be wondering? I’ll tell you: STUPID happened!!! I had been upgrading to all-metal, free-rolling wheel sets and I had forgotten to check for metal trucks. Of course I had unwittingly reversed an axle and shorted it out. That truck was hot! At least I learned a lesson: never (as in NEVER!!!) put something on the track without checking immediately to see if there’s anything wrong.

And, yes, I do miss my layout but I got to an age where it became impossible to maintain. I still operate on a few other railroads, including Art’s transition era B & O.

Kurt Youngmann

On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:21 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Kurt,  To back up your memory....here's a great shot of John actually using Floquil Paints.     I love it..  those paints were made right up the road from me.  I used to go to the factory and buy seconds when I was young... bad labels or dented tops etc.   Ya could get them cheap.   


“It is best to read the weather forecast before praying for rain.” - Mark Twain



Re: Paint

Kurt Youngmann
 

Good! It’s always reassuring to discover that my memory still works, at least occasionally.

The tank car in the photo is obviously a Varney - no surprise since John was their spokesperson for a number of years. I had 2 of those cars when I still had my SKP Lines; both have found a new home on my friend Art’s layout since I dismantled mine. I'm pretty sure they didn’t represent a specific prototype car but they had great proportions and looked like they could have existed. If any of you who model HO ever find one at a flea market, it’s worth buying if it fits your era.

Which reminds me of an anecdote about “the whistling tank car” when I still had my railroad. (I may have told this one before, but here it is again just in case):

Tuesday was work day on the SKP. Art came over every week and occasionally another friend, Jim, joined us. Jim isn’t a model railroader but he showed up for a bit of helping out. One day we powered up the railroad and were greeted by a dead short. It was driving us nuts trying to find it. We walked all around several times (it was a big layout, about 30’ X 35’, three times around the basement with more than 700 freight and 100 passenger cars. We couldn’t find the source of the short and were using a lot of words our mommies had told us never to say (which is OK because John used them all the time)! Finally, Jim, at the far end from where Art & I were standing and cussing, piped up, “Is this tank car supposed to be whistling?” We walked over and, sure enough, an Athearn 3-dome Texaco tank car (the first car I had ever purchased) was making a shrill sound. Ad soon as we lifted it off the track, the power went on.

So, what had happened, you may be wondering? I’ll tell you: STUPID happened!!! I had been upgrading to all-metal, free-rolling wheel sets and I had forgotten to check for metal trucks. Of course I had unwittingly reversed an axle and shorted it out. That truck was hot! At least I learned a lesson: never (as in NEVER!!!) put something on the track without checking immediately to see if there’s anything wrong.

And, yes, I do miss my layout but I got to an age where it became impossible to maintain. I still operate on a few other railroads, including Art’s transition era B & O.

Kurt Youngmann

On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:21 AM, Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Kurt,  To back up your memory....here's a great shot of John actually using Floquil Paints.     I love it..  those paints were made right up the road from me.  I used to go to the factory and buy seconds when I was young... bad labels or dented tops etc.   Ya could get them cheap.   


“It is best to read the weather forecast before praying for rain.” - Mark Twain


Re: Japanese Magazine TMS photos

Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Speaking of Sgt Ennis...???  Did anyone ever have a guess as to who this "Sargent Ennis" was...? 
     It is such an early engine..  must date to his earliest days in the small house.    I wonder if it has some meaning that goes back before many of John's friends and their connection with the various military bases... ?   

Randy

Re: Paint

Bruce Wilson
 

In the second part of the series in the January 1956 issue of MR John wrote in the body that he used a mixture of Floquil Black mixed with white and a touch of brown to get a warm gray..  The caption to a photo of a loco says black, white and a touch of boxcar read.

Bruce Wilson
Barrie, Ontario, Canada
Life Member    NMRA
Member    Scale 7 Group    Gauge 0 Guild  7mmNGA
Member Bird Studies Canada   Ontario Bird Banding Association
Nature Barrie      Simcoe County Banding Group
On 7/8/2019 12:21, Randy Lee Decker wrote:

Kurt,  To back up your memory....here's a great shot of John actually using Floquil Paints.     I love it..  those paints were made right up the road from me.  I used to go to the factory and buy seconds when I was young... bad labels or dented tops etc.   Ya could get them cheap.   


http://www.gdlines.org/GDLines/GD_Galleries/Rolling_Stock/slides/paintingwheels.html

_.

Re: Angels Camp

Don Mitchell <donm@...>
 

Tom --

Just noted my response to you did not get posted.  Sorry, no shot of AC other than the one in the book.  Don't believe I have the original slide, either, as there was a mixup after it was published.

Don M.

Re: Japanese Magazine TMS photos

Bob Friddle
 

Wow, zoom in and check out that paint detailing on the sergeant Ennis tender and around the number eight on the headlamp!

Thanks,


Bob Friddle, AIA, LEED AP



On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:26 AM, Randy Lee Decker via Groups.Io <randyleedecker@...> wrote:

Bill in this photo you can tell that there is now, not only, a back wall but John had an interior you can see from this side.    I have a lot more work to do....  LOL



http://www.gdlines.org/GDLines/GD_Galleries/Locomotives/slides/ennisbutler-orig.html

Re: Japanese Magazine TMS photos

Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Bill in this photo you can tell that there is now, not only, a back wall but John had an interior you can see from this side.    I have a lot more work to do....  LOL



http://www.gdlines.org/GDLines/GD_Galleries/Locomotives/slides/ennisbutler-orig.html

Re: Paint

Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Kurt,  To back up your memory....here's a great shot of John actually using Floquil Paints.     I love it..  those paints were made right up the road from me.  I used to go to the factory and buy seconds when I was young... bad labels or dented tops etc.   Ya could get them cheap.   


http://www.gdlines.org/GDLines/GD_Galleries/Rolling_Stock/slides/paintingwheels.html

Re: Japanese Magazine TMS photos

Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Bill I am still searching for the shot I remember.. it is only a glimpse of it in the background but the wall is there.    In the meantime here's another shot of the Back Dock area... and you are right that the building is open and unfinished at least at this time you can clearly see the light coming in through the missing wall.  

 http://www.gdlines.org/GDLines/GD_Galleries/Structures/slides/enginehousehighday-orig.html

Re: Japanese Magazine TMS photos

Randy Lee Decker <randyleedecker@...>
 

Hey Bill, there are shots of the building they are in the GDlines.org files under structures I think..... and perhaps various other places and they show scenes from the first and second layout.    I will look later and see if I can't find that other side.  From what I remember it was just the weathered concrete, blank wall but it was certainly enclosed.

 
I have found that, half the fun is searching and finding answers.  Go in and look around Bill,, it's a blast in there....!   Jeff has kept that site up to date and running for a long time now on his own.   The work done and the generosity of several fantastic railroad historians and John Allen fans have created the best reference guide anyone could ever ask for.  
Randy 


On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 at 9:46 AM Bill Nielsen <wrangler@...> wrote:
Thanks Tom,
Yes, that “back side” would be the side next to the track when the building was on the original (tiny) G&D. I am looking for any pictures of the side that would be opposite and parallel to the side that has the ramp. As I said above, I remember seeing a picture somewhere that upon close inspection, looked like there was no wall on that side, and if that’s the case, probably no pictures of that side exist. Of course, it’s possible that the building was uncompleted when it was used in some of the photos, and it may or may not have been finished afterwards. I guess I’ll just have to keep looking...

Bill in FtL

Re: Japanese Magazine TMS photos

Bill Nielsen
 

Thanks Tom,
Yes, that “back side” would be the side next to the track when the building was on the original (tiny) G&D. I am looking for any pictures of the side that would be opposite and parallel to the side that has the ramp. As I said above, I remember seeing a picture somewhere that upon close inspection, looked like there was no wall on that side, and if that’s the case, probably no pictures of that side exist. Of course, it’s possible that the building was uncompleted when it was used in some of the photos, and it may or may not have been finished afterwards. I guess I’ll just have to keep looking...

Bill in FtL

Re: "The Book", woooo hoooo...

Bill P
 

A Little bit of humor.
Just wondering if anyone would catch the Houndhouse - "Arf-Arf"

All for now.  Bill (bcd9 )  ∑:=) - "Meow-Meow"

Re: Paint

 

Ya Tom that's what I do too one drop here three drops there. I guess I'm a rarity as I only use a brush and water based artists paints ever since Floquil went away.. .

Re: Paint

 

Wow ... ask and thou shall receive. Thanks gang for saving me a lot of digging as I was under that train of thought when I painted this engine. I think what I did was substitute grey for white though. Trying to remember the mix so I can paint the cab & tender alike. Since then all my loco's have had custom mix paint jobs all varying around that basic formula it's just that I couldn't remember the original...... must be going senile!