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Images from a Balloon Launch


L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I launched two balloons for Open Window School on Friday. Attached are two of the nicer pictures.

The color image was taken with an Apeman A60 camera set to record images every 10 seconds. The camera is like an affordable GoPro. The gray scale image is a Near infrared image taken by a Mobius ActionCam set to monochrome. It's hot mirror has been removed and visible light is blocked with a dark blue and dark red theater gels. 

The camera combination works well together. Now to see if I can use Wood's glass to block visible light but let ultraviolet light reach the imager.


John Kovac KM6GKF
 

Cool images!

On May 20, 2018, at 6:06 AM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH <nearsys@...> wrote:

I launched two balloons for Open Window School on Friday. Attached are two of the nicer pictures.

The color image was taken with an Apeman A60 camera set to record images every 10 seconds. The camera is like an affordable GoPro. The gray scale image is a Near infrared image taken by a Mobius ActionCam set to monochrome. It's hot mirror has been removed and visible light is blocked with a dark blue and dark red theater gels. 

The camera combination works well together. Now to see if I can use Wood's glass to block visible light but let ultraviolet light reach the imager.
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Joe WB9SBD
 

So with the monochrome filtered image, what frequencies were you intending to record?

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 5/20/2018 8:06 AM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
I launched two balloons for Open Window School on Friday. Attached are two of the nicer pictures.

The color image was taken with an Apeman A60 camera set to record images every 10 seconds. The camera is like an affordable GoPro. The gray scale image is a Near infrared image taken by a Mobius ActionCam set to monochrome. It's hot mirror has been removed and visible light is blocked with a dark blue and dark red theater gels. 

The camera combination works well together. Now to see if I can use Wood's glass to block visible light but let ultraviolet light reach the imager.


L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

The imagers in digital cameras are sensitive to IR, especially to that region just beyond red. So I placed two complementary theater gels over the lens to block pretty much all visible light. The light that gets through and is recorded is near infrared.

Chlorophyll absorbs red and blue light for energy and reflects green and near infrared. So NIR images show healthy plants as very bright. 

On May 20, 2018 8:19 AM, "Joe WB9SBD" <nss@...> wrote:
So with the monochrome filtered image, what frequencies were you intending to record?

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 5/20/2018 8:06 AM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
I launched two balloons for Open Window School on Friday. Attached are two of the nicer pictures.

The color image was taken with an Apeman A60 camera set to record images every 10 seconds. The camera is like an affordable GoPro. The gray scale image is a Near infrared image taken by a Mobius ActionCam set to monochrome. It's hot mirror has been removed and visible light is blocked with a dark blue and dark red theater gels. 

The camera combination works well together. Now to see if I can use Wood's glass to block visible light but let ultraviolet light reach the imager.


Joe WB9SBD
 

Perfect!

We did the same geez 20+ years ago with a Live ATV flight. With a small CCD Camera that was big sensitivity in the Infrared.

We did not change anything in the camera, But we did use our rotating mirror system that use a mirror that had a special coating to reflect the infrared and longer freqs, and do whatever with the others.

The mirror sadly was just slightly not big enough so in the corners of the field of view we saw the straight out natural  view as the camera would normally see, and in the middle 90% was the off the mirror with the long only wavelengths seen.

The difference was incredible! The contrast was un describeable in the filtered image. Then at altitude, the usual in color images the Blue haze that washes out all the details, in that filtered image was stunning! the long waves penetrated that blue haze and the details seen on the ground were incredible!

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 5/20/2018 9:28 AM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
The imagers in digital cameras are sensitive to IR, especially to that region just beyond red. So I placed two complementary theater gels over the lens to block pretty much all visible light. The light that gets through and is recorded is near infrared.

Chlorophyll absorbs red and blue light for energy and reflects green and near infrared. So NIR images show healthy plants as very bright. 

On May 20, 2018 8:19 AM, "Joe WB9SBD" <nss@...> wrote:
So with the monochrome filtered image, what frequencies were you intending to record?

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 5/20/2018 8:06 AM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
I launched two balloons for Open Window School on Friday. Attached are two of the nicer pictures.

The color image was taken with an Apeman A60 camera set to record images every 10 seconds. The camera is like an affordable GoPro. The gray scale image is a Near infrared image taken by a Mobius ActionCam set to monochrome. It's hot mirror has been removed and visible light is blocked with a dark blue and dark red theater gels. 

The camera combination works well together. Now to see if I can use Wood's glass to block visible light but let ultraviolet light reach the imager.



L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

That's what I'm finding also. Raleigh scattering is strongest for the shortest wavelengths of light. So infrared light penetrates the air as if was nonexistent.

On May 20, 2018 8:54 AM, "Joe WB9SBD" <nss@...> wrote:
Perfect!

We did the same geez 20+ years ago with a Live ATV flight. With a small CCD Camera that was big sensitivity in the Infrared.

We did not change anything in the camera, But we did use our rotating mirror system that use a mirror that had a special coating to reflect the infrared and longer freqs, and do whatever with the others.

The mirror sadly was just slightly not big enough so in the corners of the field of view we saw the straight out natural  view as the camera would normally see, and in the middle 90% was the off the mirror with the long only wavelengths seen.

The difference was incredible! The contrast was un describeable in the filtered image. Then at altitude, the usual in color images the Blue haze that washes out all the details, in that filtered image was stunning! the long waves penetrated that blue haze and the details seen on the ground were incredible!

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 5/20/2018 9:28 AM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
The imagers in digital cameras are sensitive to IR, especially to that region just beyond red. So I placed two complementary theater gels over the lens to block pretty much all visible light. The light that gets through and is recorded is near infrared.

Chlorophyll absorbs red and blue light for energy and reflects green and near infrared. So NIR images show healthy plants as very bright. 

On May 20, 2018 8:19 AM, "Joe WB9SBD" <nss@...> wrote:
So with the monochrome filtered image, what frequencies were you intending to record?

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 5/20/2018 8:06 AM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
I launched two balloons for Open Window School on Friday. Attached are two of the nicer pictures.

The color image was taken with an Apeman A60 camera set to record images every 10 seconds. The camera is like an affordable GoPro. The gray scale image is a Near infrared image taken by a Mobius ActionCam set to monochrome. It's hot mirror has been removed and visible light is blocked with a dark blue and dark red theater gels. 

The camera combination works well together. Now to see if I can use Wood's glass to block visible light but let ultraviolet light reach the imager.