Date   

Re: David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

Which concluding part of the stunt? The helicopter ride back to the airport?

I would happily have taken his place. That would be a bucket list thing for me. If he had chickened out and I was on site, I would have told him to go hit the showers and would have grabbed on and been ready to go!

He was suffering from hypoxia just before going on oxygen. Trying to be a tough guy and making it to 20k before giving in. He was arguing saying he was fine, but he was getting giddy. As soon as he got on O2, his manner changed immediately. 

Lots of banter back and forth about what to do next, all involved should have had everything down pat. 

Dropping of sand bags from altitude is considered bombing. They should have used sandbags that could be opened and the ballast dropped. No chance of hitting something on the ground, and no need to recover the dropped ballast. 

No one could understand the difference between altitude and rate of climb. 

Upon release, it looked like he just fell in a stable arch, he should have been tracking back to the LZ. 3 miles from 25,000 feet should have been an easy return. I’ve covered a 2 mile track from 9,500. 

Asking if there are power lines by a road, and having ground support say “I can’t make any out on the image from your chest camera.” is pretty damned stupid. They should have had maps and already understood the obstructions in the area, both jumper and ground crew. The jumper has better visual than anything from a GoPro. 

Ground winds should have been understood. Anyone having flown under a steerable canopy knows how to look for ground wind tell tale signs. They also know to do a 360 before getting set up for landing to look for wind drift. 

The jumper did a poor job of choosing a landing area. He landed on some pretty rough terrain, and had to really run out the landing because he ended up in a downwind landing. 

Overall, the jump was successful, he was able to float up to altitude under a bunch of balloons. He was able to successfully *almost* miss the ground, the end goal of any skydive. 

Like just about anything you watch on TV, if you know nothing about the subject of the program, it can be entertaining and very impressive. 

When you are familiar with the subject matter however, you can usually find at least a handful of errors or problems. 

This stunt had me slapping my forehead quite often. 

One day if I’m really bored I might watch the fluff before lift off. I only watched from when they walked him from the fill area to the end. 

James
VE6SRV 


On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 4:15 PM Hank Riley via groups.io <n1ltv=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I forgot about this being a live streaming event exclusively on Youtube "Originals."

It happened yesterday in Page, AZ.  He reached ~ 24,900 feet ASL before cutting loose.

Curious if any skydivers are on list and would like to comment on that concluding part of the stunt. 

Hank










--
James
VE6SRV


David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

Hank Riley
 

I forgot about this being a live streaming event exclusively on Youtube "Originals."

It happened yesterday in Page, AZ.  He reached ~ 24,900 feet ASL before cutting loose.

Curious if any skydivers are on list and would like to comment on that concluding part of the stunt. 

Hank



Fun Story.

Keith Kaiser, WA0̷TJT
 


Re: Are there any HAB Clubs/organizations or activities in Missouri?

Jason Unwin
 

Thank you. 


On Wed, Aug 26, 2020 at 9:16, Carlton Corbitt via groups.io
<ccccrnr@...> wrote:
Hi Jason,

The question of are the Balloon groups in Missouri is a YES,  but if the question was are there very active HAB groups... maybe not so much

check 
that is a group in St Louis that is probably the most active in the state of MO.

Keith Keiser and others in Kansas City, MO did HAB balloons, but have mostly slowed down to doing them at Boy Scout Jamboree's

RoboMo - the st louis robotics club use to do them, but due to job changes and death among the primary HABer's hasn't done a flight in a while.

There is also a 4H club in Columbia MO that was focusing on space and STEM education a number of years ago, that released balloons and needed people to help chase down and return their projects.  But I haven't heard of them releasing any balloons in a few years.

Missouri may have other Near Space groups i don't know about as well.   However with the covid pandemic i suspect most groups are on hold for now.

Carlton
KI4NHK


Re: Are there any HAB Clubs/organizations or activities in Missouri?

Carlton Corbitt
 

Hi Jason,

The question of are the Balloon groups in Missouri is a YES,  but if the question was are there very active HAB groups... maybe not so much

check 
that is a group in St Louis that is probably the most active in the state of MO.

Keith Keiser and others in Kansas City, MO did HAB balloons, but have mostly slowed down to doing them at Boy Scout Jamboree's

RoboMo - the st louis robotics club use to do them, but due to job changes and death among the primary HABer's hasn't done a flight in a while.

There is also a 4H club in Columbia MO that was focusing on space and STEM education a number of years ago, that released balloons and needed people to help chase down and return their projects.  But I haven't heard of them releasing any balloons in a few years.

Missouri may have other Near Space groups i don't know about as well.   However with the covid pandemic i suspect most groups are on hold for now.

Carlton
KI4NHK


Are there any HAB Clubs/organizations or activities in Missouri?

Jason Unwin
 

I was looking at the ARHAB page for clubs and organizations that do HAB. Evidently it is not up to date.  I am moving to Missouri in the next few months to either the Sedalia or Lincoln MO area. I have helped in recovery teams with EOSS, PARK and Stratocasters down in Texas. I was at GPSL when it was in Texas a few years ago. Oklahoma doesn't seem to have anything going on. Our CAP squadron "hitched rides" on PARK flights.

If there are any people that fly in Missouri, I would like to work with them.

Jason Unwin
KF5UEF


Re: calculate elevation

Michael Hojnowski
 

What's your preferred programing language.  I suspect their are Perl and Python one-liners that'll do that if you include the right library.

Mike

On 8/23/2020 1:23 PM, Joe WB9SBD wrote:

geez 20+ years ago I had a .BAS program where if I put into it my lat/long/alt, and a second lat/long/alt it would spit out a az and el of where the balloon would be in my sky.

is there a way to do this nowdays?

I have a project loon balloon coming towards me and want to try to spot it later.

Joe WB9SBD



Re: calculate elevation

Will Halphen
 

From: GPSL@groups.io [mailto:GPSL@groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe WB9SBD
Sent: Sunday, August 23, 2020 1:23 PM
To: GPSL <GPSL@groups.io>
Subject: [GPSL] calculate elevation

 


geez 20+ years ago I had a .BAS program where if I put into it my lat/long/alt, and a second lat/long/alt it would spit out a az and el of where the balloon would be in my sky.

is there a way to do this nowdays?

I have a project loon balloon coming towards me and want to try to spot it later.

Joe WB9SBD


calculate elevation

Joe WB9SBD
 


geez 20+ years ago I had a .BAS program where if I put into it my lat/long/alt, and a second lat/long/alt it would spit out a az and el of where the balloon would be in my sky.

is there a way to do this nowdays?

I have a project loon balloon coming towards me and want to try to spot it later.

Joe WB9SBD


Re: Balloons This Morning

Barry
 

Don’t forget that they are easiest to see when the sun is at your back and they are therefore brightly illuminated by the sun. (If the sun is on the other side of the balloon it will likely be too dim to see, at least I’ve never been able to spot one unless the sun is behind me.)

 

Barry
VE6SBS

 

From: GPSL@groups.io [mailto:GPSL@groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe WB9SBD
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 8:24 AM
To: GPSL
Subject: [GPSL] Balloons This Morning

 

Looks like three were launched by Ravens this morning!

Depending on where they go I may be able to see them.
https://www.flightradar24.com/HBAL04/25366d23

Joe WB9SBD


Balloons This Morning

Joe WB9SBD
 

Looks like three were launched by Ravens this morning!

Depending on where they go I may be able to see them.
https://www.flightradar24.com/HBAL04/25366d23

Joe WB9SBD


Surfs Up 9 Flight Report/The Selfie Mission

Chief Surfer
 

Greetings!

The Selfie Mission, conceived in 2013, started with simple experiments.  Over a multi-year period, the design and payload emerged into something flyable.  I invite you to read this brief review of the Selfie Mission.



Thanks!

Joe
Chief Surfer
Surfing Satellites


Re: Interesting discussion on gas diffusion in rubber

Medad rufus
 

interesting

On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 at 10:37, steve@... via groups.io <steve=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNmmX83xIGM&t=3m16s

not what I expected.


Interesting discussion on gas diffusion in rubber

steve@btinternet.com
 


Re: Hydrogen regulators?

Carlton Corbitt
 

Hi Hank,

The regulator doesn't seem to regulate, it is about 30psi out.

Turning the knob on the front makes it open or close/stop the flow of Hydrogen. 

Maybe it never adjusted, it just seemed right pressure and i accepted it.   It does make it a little be odd to fill balloons to a precise lift.  I have to use the valve on the tank itself to control anything.
The Smith regulator only does a fixed pressure step down.  No control on the regulator except open(~30psi) or closed (0psi).

For near space ballooning it gets the job done, and for only $45.  But a regulator that doesn't adjust regulation pressure does kind of freak some people out.

Carlton
KI4NHK


Re: Hydrogen regulators?

Barry
 

No need to spend more than about $100. Some regulators have to be built using special materials (like those for corrosive gases), but hydrogen and oxygen regulators are built the same and I have purchased 4 or 5 oxygen regulators from a local regulator repair shop over the years for several teachers and others needing a hydrogen regulator for filling balloons for less than $100 each with the oxygen tank fitting replaced by the repair shop with one for a hydrogen tank. The regulators are like the ones typically seen used for welding with 2 gauges and, with them costing a bit more than $90 in Canada, you should be able to find one for even less in the US without much trouble.

 

Acetylene and oxygen regulators are much more popular and therefore less expensive than regulators for other gases plus regulators for other gases are usually laboratory grade (more precise) thus much more expensive. Regulators for other gases (other than oxygen) could probably be used as well by changing the tank fitting but you can’t beat the low cost of a new oxygen regulator plus some regulators are designed to provide a low flow rate rather than a high flow rate like an oxygen regulator does. Final point – It’s probably not a good idea (and not recommended) to modify a previously used regulator (especially an oxygen regulator) as the internal parts can out gas the previously used gas which could lead to a problem so best to start with a brand new regulator.

 

Barry
VE6SBS

 

From: GPSL@groups.io [mailto:GPSL@groups.io] On Behalf Of Larry
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 3:47 PM
To: gpsl@groups.io
Subject: [GPSL] Hydrogen regulators?

 

I keep having to ask you questions.  Well I appreciate your help anyway.  So we are  trying to shift over to hydrogen and the local welding supply place wants $500 for a regulator.  Yet I see this $93 dollar regulator on line.  

 

 

Why should I not spend $93 instead of $500?

 

Larry

 


Re: Hydrogen regulators?

Hank Riley
 

Carlton,

That's exactly the model Larry is looking at!  It's listed by Smith as a single stage by the way with a 3 year limited warranty.  Not likely you could find a two stage regulator, new, through a distributor, for that kind of low price ($93.50 from Cyberweld via Amazon).

Could you please describe in a little more detail how the regulator misbehaves?  Once set at a usable outlet pressure does it hold that pressure throughout the fill?

Hank
____________________

On Thursday, July 30, 2020, 10:50:09 AM EDT, Carlton  wrote:

One regulator to avoid might be 

Smith 30-100-350

It is a 2 stage regulator I bought off Ebay a number of years ago probably 2013-2014.  I think i paid $45 + shipping for this regulator brand New in packaging.
It has less than a dozen flights but gives frustration adjusting.


Re: Hydrogen regulators?

Carlton Corbitt
 

One regulator to avoid might be 

Smith 30-100-350

It is a 2 stage regulator I bought off Ebay a number of years ago probably 2013-2014.  I think i paid $45 + shipping for this regulator brand New in packaging.
It has less than a dozen flights but gives frustration adjusting.

I still consider it usable but with cation.   The first year (maybe 2 or 3 flights) no issues.  After warranty ended started having issues.

73,
Carlton Corbitt
KI4NHK




Helium to hydrogen thread adapter / was Re: [GPSL] Helium Supply (in 2018)

Hank Riley
 

Larry,

On Amazon now it's $26.94.  You can go lower than that on ebay right now.  


Hank
__________________________________________________________________


On Wednesday, April 18, 2018,  Bill Brown wrote:

You will need a CGA-580 to CGA-350 adaptor to use a helium regulator with a hydrogen tank but the adapter can be bought on Amazon for around $15. Also, don't crack open a hydrogen tank unless there is a regulator on it.


Re: Hydrogen regulators?

Graham
 

hydrogen cylinders and regulators use a CGA-350 connector.



A search using your favourite search engine will find many more references.

As long as the regulator has the correct inlet PSI rating  ( ie 3000 psi ) and has the correct connector  ( i.e. CGA-350 ) then all should be good.

The regulator at the link provided noted  a max inlet pressure of 3000 psi, a cga-350 connection and a 9/16"-18 LH outlet connector as I would expect as it is being sold as a hydrogen regulator.

cheers, Graham ve3gtc




On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 10:25 PM Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:
They key is for H2 is left hand thread. AND even for safety the pressure it can take. that one looks good in both cases.

NOW the one we have been using 30+ years of flights, been using H2 from first flight every flight.

But ours was not specified for H@, but some other Gas.

the thing is tho the left thread and the pressure capability.

The NOT spec'ed H2 was given to us, so cost?

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 7/29/2020 4:56 PM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
This one looks adjustable. I spent far less at my local welding shop for a regulator with fixed settings.

Are you asking for an adjustable regulator? I think mine is permanently set for 30 PSI exit (outlet?) pressure.

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020, 3:47 PM Larry <larry.phegley@...> wrote:
I keep having to ask you questions.  Well I appreciate your help anyway.  So we are  trying to shift over to hydrogen and the local welding supply place wants $500 for a regulator.  Yet I see this $93 dollar regulator on line.  


Why should I not spend $93 instead of $500?

Larry
 

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