Date   
Re: Imaging the Surface

Joe WB9SBD
 

I have yet to see a pic from say 60K and up from anyone's balloon, that you can say the image of the ground even when looking straight down is not color shifted way into the blue.

it's almost like a Black and white TV picture except it's Blue and white, everything is various shades of Blue.

Joe WB9SBD

On 6/11/2020 5:37 PM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH wrote:
Interesting. I know near infrared penetrates the air like it wasn't there. But shorter wavelength light like blue is strongly scattered.

Perhaps because the satellite looks straight down, there's less air to scatter the light. When we look horizontally through the air, we are looking through miles of air at roughly the same density. When you look down, you are seeing throgh a column of air that increases the closer you get to the ground. 

One measurement of the atmosphere is its scale height. This is the distance one must climb before the air density (which closely matches air pressure*) decreases by a factor of e (2.718...), which means a decrease to 37%. When anything changes in value based on its amount, the number e always shows up just like pi shows up when circles are involved.

Scale height depends on things like the temperature, gravity, and gas molecule mass. So scale height can vary for different gasses in an atmosphere, but with the kind of mixing we have on Earth, the scale height of the different gases in our atmosphere is the same until you get above the stratosphere.

The scale height of our atmosphere is about five miles. Since the atmospheric density is decreasing by e for every scale height, all the air compressed to the surface and uniformly at standard atmospheric pressure is also five miles thick. So technically, the amount of scattering you observe looking hortizonally through five miles of air is the same amount you observing looking down from 200 miles up. 

So I guess we shouldn't be too surprised satellites can get clear images of the surface. Even though they more than 120 miles up, it only appears like they are looking through 5.1 miles of air at sea level air density. 

By the way, scale height also tells you how fast a balloon must expand in volume to remain buoyant. The scale height of Saturn's moon Titan is 30 miles. Keeping everything constant, a balloon should be able to climb about six times higher on Titan than Earth. Perhaps we should look at holding GPSL 2100 in Titan?

*I see there's about a 1% difference between air density and air pressure by the time a balloon climbs to 100,000 feet. By coincidence, Earth's gravity also decreases by 1% at 100,000 feet. Since pressure is related to force and force is due to gravity pulling on mass, I suspect that the difference between air density and air pressure is related to the decrease in gravity at 100,000 feet in altitude.

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020, 4:03 PM Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:
Watching the news this morning they had a thing on how they are using orbital satellites to monitor the Covid-19. It was amazing imagery!

I can understand Optics on getting the clear resolution. But how do they penetrate the blue haze?

The color balance was perfect in all the shots as if they were taken from a plane at 5000 feet say. Perfect crisp images and perfect color balance not a trace of Blue.

How?

Joe WB9SBD


Re: Imaging the Surface

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

Interesting. I know near infrared penetrates the air like it wasn't there. But shorter wavelength light like blue is strongly scattered.

Perhaps because the satellite looks straight down, there's less air to scatter the light. When we look horizontally through the air, we are looking through miles of air at roughly the same density. When you look down, you are seeing throgh a column of air that increases the closer you get to the ground. 

One measurement of the atmosphere is its scale height. This is the distance one must climb before the air density (which closely matches air pressure*) decreases by a factor of e (2.718...), which means a decrease to 37%. When anything changes in value based on its amount, the number e always shows up just like pi shows up when circles are involved.

Scale height depends on things like the temperature, gravity, and gas molecule mass. So scale height can vary for different gasses in an atmosphere, but with the kind of mixing we have on Earth, the scale height of the different gases in our atmosphere is the same until you get above the stratosphere.

The scale height of our atmosphere is about five miles. Since the atmospheric density is decreasing by e for every scale height, all the air compressed to the surface and uniformly at standard atmospheric pressure is also five miles thick. So technically, the amount of scattering you observe looking hortizonally through five miles of air is the same amount you observing looking down from 200 miles up. 

So I guess we shouldn't be too surprised satellites can get clear images of the surface. Even though they more than 120 miles up, it only appears like they are looking through 5.1 miles of air at sea level air density. 

By the way, scale height also tells you how fast a balloon must expand in volume to remain buoyant. The scale height of Saturn's moon Titan is 30 miles. Keeping everything constant, a balloon should be able to climb about six times higher on Titan than Earth. Perhaps we should look at holding GPSL 2100 in Titan?

*I see there's about a 1% difference between air density and air pressure by the time a balloon climbs to 100,000 feet. By coincidence, Earth's gravity also decreases by 1% at 100,000 feet. Since pressure is related to force and force is due to gravity pulling on mass, I suspect that the difference between air density and air pressure is related to the decrease in gravity at 100,000 feet in altitude.

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020, 4:03 PM Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:
Watching the news this morning they had a thing on how they are using orbital satellites to monitor the Covid-19. It was amazing imagery!

I can understand Optics on getting the clear resolution. But how do they penetrate the blue haze?

The color balance was perfect in all the shots as if they were taken from a plane at 5000 feet say. Perfect crisp images and perfect color balance not a trace of Blue.

How?

Joe WB9SBD

Imaging the Surface

Joe WB9SBD
 

Watching the news this morning they had a thing on how they are using orbital satellites to monitor the Covid-19. It was amazing imagery!

I can understand Optics on getting the clear resolution. But how do they penetrate the blue haze?

The color balance was perfect in all the shots as if they were taken from a plane at 5000 feet say. Perfect crisp images and perfect color balance not a trace of Blue.

How?

Joe WB9SBD

Re: EOSS300 launch time

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Marty, thanks for the info and exciting to hear that #300 for EOSS will coincide with GPSL 2020.  An amazing milestone!

I think the larger group would be interested in hearing about your ADS-B setup, so even if you want to do an extemporaneous 15 minutes on the subject, that's fine.  I've had an ADS-B receiver set up on a Pi 3B since January and have wondered what it'd take to do that on a balloon.

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 2:52 PM Marty Griffin <mgriffin@...> wrote:

Hello Mark,

EOSS Plans to fly in coordination with your times which look good at 8am MDT.  We will feed video into the GPSL zoom session for those who might be interested.  Congratulations to Paul for his 200th flight  This will be EOSS 300th flight, are glad to celebrate with the virtual GPSL program.  I will provide details on our frequencies and ADS-B information.   We are now sending ADS-B to help the FAA allow us to fly in cloud cover.  Details later.

 

At this time, we do not have a talk, but we have some interest.  I will advise. 

 

Good luck with these hard times.

 

- Marty, WA0GEH, EOSS Tracking and Recovery Coordinator.

 

From: Mark Patton <kc0d@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 9:00 AM
To: Jim Langsted <jimlangsted@...>; Russ Chadwick <russ4cwop@...>
Cc: Marty Griffin <mgriffin@...>
Subject: RE: EOSS300 launch time

 

There was a discussion on the GPSL reflector about the launch time.

https://groups.io/g/GPSL/topic/gpsl_2020_update/74408777?p=,,,20,0,0,0::recentpostdate%2Fsticky,,,20,2,0,74408777

 

 

“I'm thinking about setting a 1400Z launch time for Saturday - that would be 10am ET, 9am CT, 8am MT, and 7am PT/Arizona.  I don't know if we'll have any participants in the Pacific time zone - if not, we could make it an hour earlier.   We probably don't want to go much later for our Eastern Time participants.  Anyone planning to fly a balloon for this, please chime in with your considerations.

 

As always, suggestions for how to make this a great virtual GPSL are welcome.

 

73 de Mark N9XTN”

 

Looks like we are in alignment with Mark.

Mark

 

From: Jim Langsted <jimlangsted@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 8:36 AM
To: KCØD <kc0d@...>
Subject: FW: EOSS300 launch time

 

 

 

From: Russ Chadwick <russ4cwop@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 7:52 AM
To: Marty Griffin <mgriffin@...>; James Langsted <jimlangsted@...>; Rob Wright <kc0uuo@...>; Randy Collander <Randall.S.Collander@...>
Subject: EOSS300 launch time

 

Regarding the time for a simultaneous launch across the US from 7am to 10am, I think that would work out to 7am PDT = 8am MDT = 9am CDT = 10am EDT.  So, we should plan on an 8am launch time for EOSS300 rather than the 9am we decided at the meeting last night.

 

Russ

Re: EOSS300 launch time

Michael Hojnowski
 

Just throwing this out there...  Speaking as an East Coast launcher, even launching an hour later (11am vs 10am) would be fine with me. I generally drive an 60-90 minutes west to find a launch location so that I don't land in the Catskills.  Being SO NOT a morning person, I'm fine with a later launch time.  I'll leave it to others to chime in about whether that does not work for them.  I'm OK either way.

Mike / KD2EAT

Re: EOSS300 launch time

Marty Griffin
 

Hello Mark,

EOSS Plans to fly in coordination with your times which look good at 8am MDT.  We will feed video into the GPSL zoom session for those who might be interested.  Congratulations to Paul for his 200th flight  This will be EOSS 300th flight, are glad to celebrate with the virtual GPSL program.  I will provide details on our frequencies and ADS-B information.   We are now sending ADS-B to help the FAA allow us to fly in cloud cover.  Details later.

 

At this time, we do not have a talk, but we have some interest.  I will advise. 

 

Good luck with these hard times.

 

- Marty, WA0GEH, EOSS Tracking and Recovery Coordinator.

 

From: Mark Patton <kc0d@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 9:00 AM
To: Jim Langsted <jimlangsted@...>; Russ Chadwick <russ4cwop@...>
Cc: Marty Griffin <mgriffin@...>
Subject: RE: EOSS300 launch time

 

There was a discussion on the GPSL reflector about the launch time.

https://groups.io/g/GPSL/topic/gpsl_2020_update/74408777?p=,,,20,0,0,0::recentpostdate%2Fsticky,,,20,2,0,74408777

 

 

“I'm thinking about setting a 1400Z launch time for Saturday - that would be 10am ET, 9am CT, 8am MT, and 7am PT/Arizona.  I don't know if we'll have any participants in the Pacific time zone - if not, we could make it an hour earlier.   We probably don't want to go much later for our Eastern Time participants.  Anyone planning to fly a balloon for this, please chime in with your considerations.

 

As always, suggestions for how to make this a great virtual GPSL are welcome.

 

73 de Mark N9XTN”

 

Looks like we are in alignment with Mark.

Mark

 

From: Jim Langsted <jimlangsted@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 8:36 AM
To: KCØD <kc0d@...>
Subject: FW: EOSS300 launch time

 

 

 

From: Russ Chadwick <russ4cwop@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 7:52 AM
To: Marty Griffin <mgriffin@...>; James Langsted <jimlangsted@...>; Rob Wright <kc0uuo@...>; Randy Collander <Randall.S.Collander@...>
Subject: EOSS300 launch time

 

Regarding the time for a simultaneous launch across the US from 7am to 10am, I think that would work out to 7am PDT = 8am MDT = 9am CDT = 10am EDT.  So, we should plan on an 8am launch time for EOSS300 rather than the 9am we decided at the meeting last night.

 

Russ

Re: Saturday flight

John Kovac KM6GKF
 

T4i would be awesome.  

I’m shooting in RAW format, so not editing the photos is not an option, plus the files are huge, but it’s worth it in my opinion.  Not doing much with color, but the Dehaze filter in Adobe Lightroom is amazing.  It brings out detail really well. Also making heavy use of the Texture filter.  On some of the images between the clouds I also used a Linear Gradient, which allows you to edit the parts of a horizon-split shot separately.

Lightroom CC is a significant monthly fee, and the support sucks, but it’s still the best choice for my needs.  Works well with RAW, intuitive controls, really powerful. 



On Jun 10, 2020, at 8:22 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:


Did you do a lot of color work to bring the detail out and cut the haze?  I've been using Canon point-and-shoot cameras with CHDK firmware and I get a lot of haze in many of my shots.  I have not invested much time or money in photo editing software, which I may need to do.  Part of the issue is flying in Great Plains summers when there is a boatload of moisture in the air - you guys probably have drier atmospheres most of the time.

I have a T4i that is several years old and have been thinking of getting a newer model, so a balloon cam might be a good use for the old one.

73 de Mark N9XTN


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 8:35 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
Thanks Mark.

Setup up is cheap DSLR, Canon Rebel T7.  I was using a T2i that I bought for $100 on eBay but out last payload was stolen.  So I splurged and bought a new T7 (not T7i which has multiple advantages but costs way more.). It was $400 for a kit with a 50mm lens.  For the lens here I used Canon 10-18mm zoom, under $300 new.  The zoom is obviously useless for this application but as far as I know, there is no prime lens that wide for that cheap that fits a Canon EF mount.   Using a $20 intervalometer to trigger the shutter every 10 seconds.  I know there is program called Magic Lantern that people use instead of an intervalometer but the intervalometer is cheap, lightweight, and really easy to use.



On Jun 10, 2020, at 6:13 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:


Great photos, John!  Makes me think about wanting to risk a DSLR on a future flight.  What's your DSLR setup (camera and lens)?

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 7:45 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
Hi all,

First, thanks again to everyone on this list for the amazing support on our previous flight.

This time, the payload was not stolen.

It was a very long flight because the balloon hung out for a long time at high altitude, thought maybe we had a slow leak that was gonna send us over the ocean.  Still not sure what happened there, but it did finally break just short of 114,000 feet. The DSLR died at about 4 and a half hours, but the GoPro3+ on a Sabient add-on battery pack ran for almost six hours, and got the landing on video for the first time ever for us.

Flickr (stills) and YouTube (video) links below.

Best,

John Kovac










Re: Saturday flight

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Did you do a lot of color work to bring the detail out and cut the haze?  I've been using Canon point-and-shoot cameras with CHDK firmware and I get a lot of haze in many of my shots.  I have not invested much time or money in photo editing software, which I may need to do.  Part of the issue is flying in Great Plains summers when there is a boatload of moisture in the air - you guys probably have drier atmospheres most of the time.

I have a T4i that is several years old and have been thinking of getting a newer model, so a balloon cam might be a good use for the old one.

73 de Mark N9XTN


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 8:35 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
Thanks Mark.

Setup up is cheap DSLR, Canon Rebel T7.  I was using a T2i that I bought for $100 on eBay but out last payload was stolen.  So I splurged and bought a new T7 (not T7i which has multiple advantages but costs way more.). It was $400 for a kit with a 50mm lens.  For the lens here I used Canon 10-18mm zoom, under $300 new.  The zoom is obviously useless for this application but as far as I know, there is no prime lens that wide for that cheap that fits a Canon EF mount.   Using a $20 intervalometer to trigger the shutter every 10 seconds.  I know there is program called Magic Lantern that people use instead of an intervalometer but the intervalometer is cheap, lightweight, and really easy to use.



On Jun 10, 2020, at 6:13 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:


Great photos, John!  Makes me think about wanting to risk a DSLR on a future flight.  What's your DSLR setup (camera and lens)?

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 7:45 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
Hi all,

First, thanks again to everyone on this list for the amazing support on our previous flight.

This time, the payload was not stolen.

It was a very long flight because the balloon hung out for a long time at high altitude, thought maybe we had a slow leak that was gonna send us over the ocean.  Still not sure what happened there, but it did finally break just short of 114,000 feet. The DSLR died at about 4 and a half hours, but the GoPro3+ on a Sabient add-on battery pack ran for almost six hours, and got the landing on video for the first time ever for us.

Flickr (stills) and YouTube (video) links below.

Best,

John Kovac










Re: Saturday flight

John Kovac KM6GKF
 

Thanks Mark.

Setup up is cheap DSLR, Canon Rebel T7.  I was using a T2i that I bought for $100 on eBay but out last payload was stolen.  So I splurged and bought a new T7 (not T7i which has multiple advantages but costs way more.). It was $400 for a kit with a 50mm lens.  For the lens here I used Canon 10-18mm zoom, under $300 new.  The zoom is obviously useless for this application but as far as I know, there is no prime lens that wide for that cheap that fits a Canon EF mount.   Using a $20 intervalometer to trigger the shutter every 10 seconds.  I know there is program called Magic Lantern that people use instead of an intervalometer but the intervalometer is cheap, lightweight, and really easy to use.



On Jun 10, 2020, at 6:13 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:


Great photos, John!  Makes me think about wanting to risk a DSLR on a future flight.  What's your DSLR setup (camera and lens)?

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 7:45 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
Hi all,

First, thanks again to everyone on this list for the amazing support on our previous flight.

This time, the payload was not stolen.

It was a very long flight because the balloon hung out for a long time at high altitude, thought maybe we had a slow leak that was gonna send us over the ocean.  Still not sure what happened there, but it did finally break just short of 114,000 feet. The DSLR died at about 4 and a half hours, but the GoPro3+ on a Sabient add-on battery pack ran for almost six hours, and got the landing on video for the first time ever for us.

Flickr (stills) and YouTube (video) links below.

Best,

John Kovac










Re: Saturday flight

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Great photos, John!  Makes me think about wanting to risk a DSLR on a future flight.  What's your DSLR setup (camera and lens)?

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 7:45 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
Hi all,

First, thanks again to everyone on this list for the amazing support on our previous flight.

This time, the payload was not stolen.

It was a very long flight because the balloon hung out for a long time at high altitude, thought maybe we had a slow leak that was gonna send us over the ocean.  Still not sure what happened there, but it did finally break just short of 114,000 feet. The DSLR died at about 4 and a half hours, but the GoPro3+ on a Sabient add-on battery pack ran for almost six hours, and got the landing on video for the first time ever for us.

Flickr (stills) and YouTube (video) links below.

Best,

John Kovac










Saturday flight

John Kovac KM6GKF
 

Hi all,

First, thanks again to everyone on this list for the amazing support on our previous flight.

This time, the payload was not stolen.

It was a very long flight because the balloon hung out for a long time at high altitude, thought maybe we had a slow leak that was gonna send us over the ocean.  Still not sure what happened there, but it did finally break just short of 114,000 feet. The DSLR died at about 4 and a half hours, but the GoPro3+ on a Sabient add-on battery pack ran for almost six hours, and got the landing on video for the first time ever for us.

Flickr (stills) and YouTube (video) links below.

Best,

John Kovac










tracker.hab.org

Larry
 

I had Andy add my call sign last year and tried to use this.  It tracked OK but I couldn't see the updated landing location.  Andy warned me before I tried  to use it again to make sure my call sign had not been deleted.  
Does someone have permission to add my call sign?

KJ6PBS-2

And is there some set up I need to do to have the forecast work?

Larry
KJ6PBS

Re: Pico balloon race from West Coast to East Coast today

Bill Brown
 

Mark,

  Email me at  wb8elk   at   Gmail and I'll send you ordering info.

- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: Iverson, Mark A <mark.a.iverson@...>
To: GPSL@groups.io <GPSL@groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jun 1, 2020 10:36 am
Subject: Re: [GPSL] Pico balloon race from West Coast to East Coast today

Bill,

Where can I get a couple of your Skytrackers? I have always wanted to do a Pico balloon!

Thanks! 
Mark 


On Jun 1, 2020, at 9:44 AM, Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...> wrote:


This could be a good test of our planned live streaming of GPSL launches. Four Pico balloons using APRS Skytrackers on 36-inch mylar foil balloons will lift off from CA and Oregon this morning live-streamed on YouTube. Weather permitting I may join them as they fly past here for an extended race across the Atlantic and KM4BUN and KM4ZIA in Atlanta may also join the race across the Atlantic.


- Bill WB8ELK

Re: Pico balloon race from West Coast to East Coast today

Iverson, Mark A
 

Bill,

Where can I get a couple of your Skytrackers? I have always wanted to do a Pico balloon!

Thanks! 
Mark 


On Jun 1, 2020, at 9:44 AM, Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...> wrote:


This could be a good test of our planned live streaming of GPSL launches. Four Pico balloons using APRS Skytrackers on 36-inch mylar foil balloons will lift off from CA and Oregon this morning live-streamed on YouTube. Weather permitting I may join them as they fly past here for an extended race across the Atlantic and KM4BUN and KM4ZIA in Atlanta may also join the race across the Atlantic.


- Bill WB8ELK

Pico balloon race from West Coast to East Coast today

Bill Brown
 

This could be a good test of our planned live streaming of GPSL launches. Four Pico balloons using APRS Skytrackers on 36-inch mylar foil balloons will lift off from CA and Oregon this morning live-streamed on YouTube. Weather permitting I may join them as they fly past here for an extended race across the Atlantic and KM4BUN and KM4ZIA in Atlanta may also join the race across the Atlantic.


- Bill WB8ELK

Symposium on Zoom for GPSL 2020

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

GPSL 2020,

Thanks to Mike KD2EAT, we have access to an enterprise-level Zoom account with the ability to record and export video.  Jim Emmert has volunteered to edit the recordings into individual presentations and put them up on YouTube.  We should be able to host a few hundred participants.  Our going-in plan is to mute everyone on arrival, and all but the host and speaker during the presentations.

My (somewhat limited) experience with large online meetings has been that asking questions in a chat window is more effective than by voice.  The speaker can choose to take the question during the session, or hold it until the end.  Keeping everyone muted will avoid the accidental open mike during a presentation, which can be really annoying for everyone.

Video sharing may be an issue - the quality of the video shared through Zoom is not the best, certainly lower quality than viewing it on YouTube.  I think the way to go might be to upload the video to YouTube, then provide the URL in your presentation and count everyone down to hit the "play" button.  Mike and I are going to do some experiments to see what works best.

In a subsequent announcement, we will open free on-line registration through the superlaunch.org website.  We'll provide the Zoom URL off-list to registered participants only to minimize Zoom-bombing (but we'll also be able to block if necessary).  

I believe I have four presentations on the schedule now, still looking for more.  You can contact me directly to volunteer.  It's not hard, and does not have to involve a lot of preparation.  Walking through some cool photos, a demo of your payload, or showing a neat video is great.

For Saturday, I am thinking about having a relatively open meeting format starting pre-launch and continuing through recovery.  It would have to pretty unmoderated, unless someone who's not flying would like to volunteer.  I don't know how well everyone can share from their phones or chase laptops, but it might be fun for people to kind of scan around to different chase teams.  

After recovery, we could either have unscheduled open mike sharing through the afternoon, or a set time in the evening for everyone to get home, do a quick review of their photos/video, and make a short presentation.  

If you have suggestions or ideas for GPSL 2020, let me know.  While we can't meet in person, having this be a virtual session opens up a lot of other possibilities, especially for presentations from people who might not normally be able to participate in a GPSL.  

73 de Mark N9XTN


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Re: Just for comic relief: Pint in Space!

Steve G8KHW / AJ4XE
 

What makes you say that?  From the Hydrogen cylinders used (and rolling countryside) I'd say it was shot in the UK by UK company Sent-Into-Space

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoIPcV8FwsQ&t=28s

    Steve G8KHW

On 29/05/2020 13:29, Wayne wrote:
The video looks it was filmed by the students at SpaceWeather.com for their Earth to Sky store gift items.
www.spaceweather.com

--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

Re: Just for comic relief: Pint in Space!

Wayne
 

The video looks it was filmed by the students at SpaceWeather.com for their Earth to Sky store gift items.
www.spaceweather.com

Just for comic relief: Pint in Space!

Hank Riley
 

Re: GPSL 2020 will be virtual

John Dinneen
 

Happy Memorial Day everyone,

 

Turns out our EOSS Club Treasurer has an Enterprise Version of ZOOM which has much higher limits and advanced features he is willing to share for GPSL.

 

More Detail to come from Rob N0RPF  roblights@...

 

Stand by for more

 

John F Dinneen KCØL

kc0l@...

john.dinneen@...

Home: 469.362.1942

Cell:    214.797.3399

 

From: GPSL@groups.io <GPSL@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jerry via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2020 3:44 PM
To: GPSL@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GPSL] GPSL 2020 will be virtual

 

If we think there will be more than that attending we can all chip in for a large meeting add on for a month at $65.  That would raise the limit to 500

 

Jerry Gable
Balloon Flight Prediction tools
http://www.s3research.com

 

 

On Saturday, May 23, 2020, 12:40:53 PM MST, John Dinneen <john.dinneen@...> wrote:

 

 

Mark,

 

I have a ZOOM Pro account which can host up to 100 participants for meetings up to 24 hours long

I can also record, but would record to a file on my PC which could then be shared via DropBox.

 

ZOOM recording to the Cloud is constrained to 1 Gb – and an 8 hour conference video would be much larger than that.

 

I am happy to donate my account for use for GPSL.

 

Thanks for all you are doing in this interesting year!

 

John F Dinneen KCØL

kc0l@...

john.dinneen@...

Home: 469.362.1942

Cell:    214.797.3399

 

From: GPSL@groups.io <GPSL@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Conner N9XTN
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 10:07 PM
To: GPSL@groups.io
Subject: [GPSL] GPSL 2020 will be virtual

 

I received word today from my contact at the University of Nebraska-Omaha that they will not be able to host us for this year's GPSL event.  While Nebraska has already lifted some gathering restrictions and will lift additional ones on June 1, I think the ones that will remain will make it difficult to host an enjoyable event.  In-person participation also looks to be considerably reduced compared to previous years, and finding an appropriate venue at this date will be problematic.

 

We still plan to have our usual Friday symposium, so this will serve as a call for presenters.  Even if you just want to have 10 minutes to show a cool video you have, that's great.  

 

The meeting platform is also open for discussion.  Zoom and Google Meet appear to be limited to 100 participants for their free tier, and we may well exceed that number.  If someone has access to a higher tier, particularly one that would support recording, that would be great.  I don't know if recordings from any of those platforms can be exported to YouTube, or if recording access would be limited to that platform.  If someone would be willing to help me out in this area, it would be greatly appreciated.  I may be able to use my employer's Microsoft Teams capability, but will have to see if there are issues with doing so.  It looks like Teams recordings can be exported.

 

We also plan to have a simultaneous Saturday launch for teams that would like to fly for GPSL.  We'll be in at least three different time zones for launches, so we'll have to pick a time compatible for everyone.   I'm thinking we'll also have an post-flight meeting for people to share experiences.

 

While it's a disappointment we can't meet in person this year, I'm hopeful we can still have a great event at our own locations for our 20th Super Launch.

 

73 de Mark N9XTN

GPSL 2020 coordinator

 

 

Image removed by sender.

Virus-free. www.avg.com