Date   

Re: Like to track balloons? How about tracking radiosondes!

Hank Riley
 

What a kick this is.  There are many newer (presumably better) versions of this original Yagi Cad 4.1 program from the author Paul of Australia.  They're ALL there including the very first version, 4.2, done in Quick Basic.  

Read the history to find out how the name 4.1 came about (it wasn't from Paul!) and other interesting tidbits, especially to the software writers on the GPSL list.


_______________________________________________________________

On Wednesday, November 24, 2021, 08:03:51 PM EST, Barry L. Lankford wrote:

 There's still a current website that has what appears to be the original WB2HOL design,
although I think some of the links may be dead, particularly the onesfor the YAGI-CAD41 program:

> http://theleggios.net/wb2hol/projects/rdf/tape_bm.htm

I was able to find the Zip file for Yagi-Cad on one of my old hard
drives, but I recall that the program had some issues even then with the
then-current version of MS-DOS (Yes, that's right, YagiCad runs in
MS-DOS, NOT Windows!).  I wouldn't even think about trying to run it
with Win10's DOS window!


Re: Like to track balloons? How about tracking radiosondes!

Barry L. Lankford
 

(See the last paragraph for my experience with obtaining Raspberry Pis recently)

As for chasing radiosondes: Been there, done that! And yeah, it was a lot of fun. I think I started chasing ozonesondes around 2006 with Bill Brown WB8ELK and Gary Dion N4TXI. University of Alabama-Huntsville's (UAH) Atmospheric Science department was launching Ozonesondes every Saturday at 1:00pm. Around that same time, I believe, Joe Leggio WB2HOL put up his steel tape measure & PVC pipe Yagi antenna design on a website. It was a simple 3-element Yagi for 2 meters that had a nice cardiod pattern with a deep & narrow notch on the backside, a broad forward beamwidth, and even some gain. Don't recall the year, but it was near June I think. I recall going to Sears (R.I.P.) and getting a nice discount on 1 inch tape measure refills because they were having a Father's Day sale! Nowadays, in the US, you could get 25 foot x 1 inch tapes for free from Harbor Freight!

The narrow notch was good for refining the direction. There's still a current website that has what appears to be the original WB2HOL design, although I think some of the links may be dead, particularly the ones for the YAGI-CAD41 program:

http://theleggios.net/wb2hol/projects/rdf/tape_bm.htm
I was able to find the Zip file for Yagi-Cad on one of my old hard drives, but I recall that the program had some issues even then with the then-current version of MS-DOS (Yes, that's right, YagiCad runs in MS-DOS, NOT Windows!). I wouldn't even think about trying to run it with Win10's DOS window!

I have an Icom IC-R3 that works well at 403 MHz that I used in the "twenty-aughts" (or is it: "Twenty-naughties") with its extensible whip antenna, so I used YagiCad to re-tune WB2HOL's 2 Meter Yagi design to 403 MHz. Worked very well to replace the R3's whip -- I was able to pick up signals and direction from at least a mile away with the 'sonde laying on the ground in a tightly packed old residential area of a nearby city. No one else was able to get a signal at all, IIRC. When the balloon was a ways into the sky, I could pick it up from many miles away.

I also built a Tape Measure Yagi from WB2HOL's original 2 Meter dimensions. Never used it much, but it seemed to work well to add some extra range to 2M HT comms.

For both antennas, I didn't much like Joe's mechanical design, with its big worm-drive hose clamps and everything on the outside of the pipe, so I came up with my own design as you can see in the attached photos. I modified a spade-type 7/8th inch wood bit by grinding off equal amounts from each edge so it'd drill a 0.807" hole (I think that was the dimension - it's the outside diameter of 1/2 inch pipe). I used the modified bit to remove the shoulders inside the tee and cross fittings for the elements, so the tape would lay all the way through the fitting without kinking. The elements were clamped in place with 3/4" plugs which were longitudinally slit (band-saw kerf) and filled with RTV. I actually used Google/Trimble's "SketchUp" 3D modelling software to draw detailed plans of how to make all the PVC parts and assemble them with the tape measure elements, unfortunately I can't find the files now. The hairpin match was also moved inside the PVC parts. I had no problems at all soldering to the steel tape, but I used a single-cut mill bastard file to file off the paint AND the dull coating on the steel, until I got bright, shiny metal. It would've been easy to use RTV instead of PVC cement to assemble the antennas and make them watertight, and probably capable to being disassembled for repair if necessary.

As for the Raspberry Pis, I just ordered and received a 4GB R-Pi 4B, a 8GB R-Pi 4B, an R-Pi Zero 2 W and an R-Pi Pico (along with a lot of other goodies) from The US Raspberry Pi Shop (Pishop.us) almost a month ago. The parts were priced the same as the Foundation's advertised prices (but shipping was extra). I got everything I ordered, but there were a few things I wanted that were out of stock.

Barry N4MSJ


On 11/24/2021 2:00 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN wrote:
GPSLers,
Mike KD2EAT and I did a presentation a couple of years ago about tracking NWS radiosondes.  At that time, the "price of entry" was a little steep both in terms of Raspberry Pi setup and building a 1680 MHz helical antenna with an attached LNA.
Since then, more and more of the NWS sites have migrated to 400 MHz for their sondes.  In addition, some sites use Graw and Vaisala sondes which have meteorological data that is decodeable by the Pi software.  The Lockheed Martin LMS-6 series only has lat/lon/alt data that is decodeable.  The user community reports very good 400 MHz range performance (200 mi/300 km or more if sonde is above horizon) using simple antennas (1/4 ground plane) and no preamp necessary most of the time.
If you are near a site that launches 400 MHz sondes, you can get into the tracking business with these items:
* 403 MHz ground plane antenna (maybe $5 for a SO-239 or N bulkhead
connector and some solid 12-14 ga copper wire)
* Feedline with appropriate ends ($20-ish depending on length needed)
* RTL-based SDR covering 400 MHz band (most of them, $20-30, Nooelec
is a good brand)
* Raspberry Pi 3B or 4 (Zero will probably not give good enough
performance)
For 1680 MHz tracking, you'd need these items:
* 1680 MHz helical antenna (3D-printer file available)
* 1680 MHz LNA ($50)
* Bias-T capability on the SDR to power the LNA via feedline
A note about Raspberry Pi's - they seem to be in short supply at the moment.  Pricing on Amazon is kind of high right now IMO and availability is not so great.  There appear to be plenty of 4 Gb Pi 4's available, but they're expensive and 4 Gb RAM is overkill for this application.  Pi 3's are priced well above the normal MSRP of ~$35, even allowing for typical kit parts.  More extensive searching might be worth some time.
The Linux "radiosonde_auto_rx" software is now installable within a Docker container.  You do not need in-depth knowledge of Docker to install the software, and Docker manages all the library dependencies for you.  Software updates are really simple and Mark VK5QI is very active in maintaining and upgrading this software.
https://github.com/projecthorus/radiosonde_auto_rx/wiki has all the info about how the receiver software works and how to install it.  The instructions are very clear and the user community is pretty helpful. radiosonde_auto_rx@... <mailto:radiosonde_auto_rx@...> is the email list.
sondehub.org <http://sondehub.org> is a central location for tracking radiosondes.  You can see where current stations are receiving data (green circles) and where sondes are launched (gray).  When there are sonde flights in progress, you will also see their tracks on the site. Clicking on a circle brings up info about the type, timing, and frequency of sondes being launched.  If the sonde site reports the sonde type is RSxx, LMS-6 403, or DFM-XX, you can receive it on a 400 MHz antenna.  This site is global in nature, with quite a few European, US, and Australian users but only a handful of Canadians appearing.
My own station is a 1680 MHz setup that has been in operation since April 2020 - at first, just a portable setup but now a weatherproof one outside on a mast.  The local NWS office will migrate to 400 MHz next spring, so I need to get busy and build an antenna for it.
This might make a good winter project if the weather is too unfavorable for doing ARHAB launches and chases in your area.  Sorry if this seems a little random, but I'm hoping more people in our community will give this a try.
73 de Mark N9XTN
_._,_._,_


Re: Like to track balloons? How about tracking radiosondes!

Christopher Rose
 

Vilros.com for Pis

-----------------------------------------

From: "Mark Conner N9XTN"
To: GPSL@groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday November 24 2021 4:41:46PM
Subject: [GPSL] Like to track balloons? How about tracking radiosondes!

GPSLers,

Mike KD2EAT and I did a presentation a couple of years ago about tracking NWS radiosondes.  At that time, the "price of entry" was a little steep both in terms of Raspberry Pi setup and building a 1680 MHz helical antenna with an attached LNA.  

Since then, more and more of the NWS sites have migrated to 400 MHz for their sondes.  In addition, some sites use Graw and Vaisala sondes which have meteorological data that is decodeable by the Pi software.  The Lockheed Martin LMS-6 series only has lat/lon/alt data that is decodeable.  The user community reports very good 400 MHz range performance (200 mi/300 km or more if sonde is above horizon) using simple antennas (1/4 ground plane) and no preamp necessary most of the time.

If you are near a site that launches 400 MHz sondes, you can get into the tracking business with these items:
  • 403 MHz ground plane antenna (maybe $5 for a SO-239 or N bulkhead connector and some solid 12-14 ga copper wire)
  • Feedline with appropriate ends ($20-ish depending on length needed)
  • RTL-based SDR covering 400 MHz band (most of them, $20-30, Nooelec is a good brand)
  • Raspberry Pi 3B or 4 (Zero will probably not give good enough performance)
For 1680 MHz tracking, you'd need these items:
  • 1680 MHz helical antenna (3D-printer file available)
  • 1680 MHz LNA ($50)
  • Bias-T capability on the SDR to power the LNA via feedline
A note about Raspberry Pi's - they seem to be in short supply at the moment.  Pricing on Amazon is kind of high right now IMO and availability is not so great.  There appear to be plenty of 4 Gb Pi 4's available, but they're expensive and 4 Gb RAM is overkill for this application.  Pi 3's are priced well above the normal MSRP of ~$35, even allowing for typical kit parts.  More extensive searching might be worth some time.

The Linux "radiosonde_auto_rx" software is now installable within a Docker container.  You do not need in-depth knowledge of Docker to install the software, and Docker manages all the library dependencies for you.  Software updates are really simple and Mark VK5QI is very active in maintaining and upgrading this software.

https://github.com/projecthorus/radiosonde_auto_rx/wiki has all the info about how the receiver software works and how to install it.  The instructions are very clear and the user community is pretty helpful.  radiosonde_auto_rx@... is the email list.  

sondehub.org is a central location for tracking radiosondes.  You can see where current stations are receiving data (green circles) and where sondes are launched (gray).  When there are sonde flights in progress, you will also see their tracks on the site.  Clicking on a circle brings up info about the type, timing, and frequency of sondes being launched.  If the sonde site reports the sonde type is RSxx, LMS-6 403, or DFM-XX, you can receive it on a 400 MHz antenna.  This site is global in nature, with quite a few European, US, and Australian users but only a handful of Canadians appearing.  

My own station is a 1680 MHz setup that has been in operation since April 2020 - at first, just a portable setup but now a weatherproof one outside on a mast.  The local NWS office will migrate to 400 MHz next spring, so I need to get busy and build an antenna for it.  

This might make a good winter project if the weather is too unfavorable for doing ARHAB launches and chases in your area.  Sorry if this seems a little random, but I'm hoping more people in our community will give this a try. 

73 de Mark N9XTN


Like to track balloons? How about tracking radiosondes!

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

GPSLers,

Mike KD2EAT and I did a presentation a couple of years ago about tracking NWS radiosondes.  At that time, the "price of entry" was a little steep both in terms of Raspberry Pi setup and building a 1680 MHz helical antenna with an attached LNA.  

Since then, more and more of the NWS sites have migrated to 400 MHz for their sondes.  In addition, some sites use Graw and Vaisala sondes which have meteorological data that is decodeable by the Pi software.  The Lockheed Martin LMS-6 series only has lat/lon/alt data that is decodeable.  The user community reports very good 400 MHz range performance (200 mi/300 km or more if sonde is above horizon) using simple antennas (1/4 ground plane) and no preamp necessary most of the time.

If you are near a site that launches 400 MHz sondes, you can get into the tracking business with these items:
  • 403 MHz ground plane antenna (maybe $5 for a SO-239 or N bulkhead connector and some solid 12-14 ga copper wire)
  • Feedline with appropriate ends ($20-ish depending on length needed)
  • RTL-based SDR covering 400 MHz band (most of them, $20-30, Nooelec is a good brand)
  • Raspberry Pi 3B or 4 (Zero will probably not give good enough performance)
For 1680 MHz tracking, you'd need these items:
  • 1680 MHz helical antenna (3D-printer file available)
  • 1680 MHz LNA ($50)
  • Bias-T capability on the SDR to power the LNA via feedline
A note about Raspberry Pi's - they seem to be in short supply at the moment.  Pricing on Amazon is kind of high right now IMO and availability is not so great.  There appear to be plenty of 4 Gb Pi 4's available, but they're expensive and 4 Gb RAM is overkill for this application.  Pi 3's are priced well above the normal MSRP of ~$35, even allowing for typical kit parts.  More extensive searching might be worth some time.

The Linux "radiosonde_auto_rx" software is now installable within a Docker container.  You do not need in-depth knowledge of Docker to install the software, and Docker manages all the library dependencies for you.  Software updates are really simple and Mark VK5QI is very active in maintaining and upgrading this software.

https://github.com/projecthorus/radiosonde_auto_rx/wiki has all the info about how the receiver software works and how to install it.  The instructions are very clear and the user community is pretty helpful.  radiosonde_auto_rx@... is the email list.  

sondehub.org is a central location for tracking radiosondes.  You can see where current stations are receiving data (green circles) and where sondes are launched (gray).  When there are sonde flights in progress, you will also see their tracks on the site.  Clicking on a circle brings up info about the type, timing, and frequency of sondes being launched.  If the sonde site reports the sonde type is RSxx, LMS-6 403, or DFM-XX, you can receive it on a 400 MHz antenna.  This site is global in nature, with quite a few European, US, and Australian users but only a handful of Canadians appearing.  

My own station is a 1680 MHz setup that has been in operation since April 2020 - at first, just a portable setup but now a weatherproof one outside on a mast.  The local NWS office will migrate to 400 MHz next spring, so I need to get busy and build an antenna for it.  

This might make a good winter project if the weather is too unfavorable for doing ARHAB launches and chases in your area.  Sorry if this seems a little random, but I'm hoping more people in our community will give this a try. 

73 de Mark N9XTN


Re: Does anyone recognize these HAB's?

Hank Riley
 

This is what Luis is referring to:


Inline image

___________________________________________________________________

On Monday, November 22, 2021, 10:07:01 PM EST, Luis Eduardo Pacheco <stratocat.iespana.es@...> wrote:

AFAIK it was the balloon that appeared near Sendai, Japan on June 2020. Still a mystery for me who and where launched it. 


Re: Does anyone recognize these HAB's?

Luis Eduardo Pacheco
 

AFAIK it was the balloon that appeared near Sendai, Japan on June 2020. Still a mistery for me who and where launched it. 

The only thing I remember is that it was not so high in the sky...

If you find some data on it please let us know. 

Cheers

Luis E.Pacheco / Editor
lep@...

StratoCat - History and present of the use of stratospheric balloons in the fields of science, military and aerospace
https://stratocat.com.ar/indexe.html




El lun, 22 nov 2021 a las 23:40, Zack Clobes W0ZC (<zclobes@...>) escribió:
I don't really have much background information to work with. I was asked if I could provide any information about these photos.

image.png


Zack Clobes, W0ZC
Project: Traveler
www.projecttraveler.org

Join us on Facebook for the latest information:



Project: Traveler is a research project of Custom Digital Services, LLC.


Does anyone recognize these HAB's?

Zack Clobes W0ZC
 

I don't really have much background information to work with. I was asked if I could provide any information about these photos.

image.png


Zack Clobes, W0ZC
Project: Traveler
www.projecttraveler.org

Join us on Facebook for the latest information:



Project: Traveler is a research project of Custom Digital Services, LLC.


Re: Circles in APRS.FI

Hank Riley
 

Joe, try to remember that Google is your friend, and he/she/it/them is smarter than ever.


__________________________________________________________

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 7:02 PM Joe wrote:

I forgot what the two circles mean on the APRS.FI Page?


Re: Circles in APRS.FI

Mustafa Tan
 

Hi Joe,

They are dead reckoning and radio horizon circles: http://blog.aprs.fi/2012/03/dead-reckoning-and-horizont-circles.html

TA2MUN


On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 7:02 PM Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:
This has been soooo long,

I forgot what the two circles mean on the APRS.FI Page?

Joe WB9SBD




Circles in APRS.FI

Joe WB9SBD
 

This has been soooo long,

I forgot what the two circles mean on the APRS.FI Page?

Joe WB9SBD


Re: APRS

Joe WB9SBD
 

Direwolf was confusing enough.

But this YAAC, is even moreso.

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 11/17/2021 7:56 PM, Keith Kaiser, WA0̷TJT wrote:
Why don’t you just use YAAC? Add in Direwolf if need be.

Keith, WA0̷TJT
Take a look at: https://net-control.us
Then consider joining: https://groups.io/g/NCM

On Nov 17, 2021, at 5:27 PM, Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:

I am trying to get an APRS monitor system working. It is one that many recommend and says works great.
It does not need a TNC,

Anyone want to try to see if this works? Install them, and make them work?
try to make these two work together?
This is first to replace the TNC,

http://uz7.ho.ua/packetradio.htm

Then this would be the mapping program to work with.

https://www.pinpointaprs.com/

Anyone?

I am close, I have the soundcard TNC thing working just fine, decodes the packets great.

I also have the mapping program also working great. It even says it is "Connected to the TNC"

BUT,,  the data being displayed by the soundmodem/TNC thing it's data is not getting plotted in the Map.

o the two programs are working, and the map sees the TNC,  but they are not sharing the map data. as seen here
<on.jpg>

I need someone better than I, to get these to work together, and then help me make my setup here do it too.

Joe WB9SBD



Re: APRS

Keith Kaiser, WA0̷TJT
 

Why don’t you just use YAAC? Add in Direwolf if need be.

Keith, WA0̷TJT
Take a look at: https://net-control.us
Then consider joining: https://groups.io/g/NCM

On Nov 17, 2021, at 5:27 PM, Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:

I am trying to get an APRS monitor system working. It is one that many recommend and says works great.
It does not need a TNC,

Anyone want to try to see if this works? Install them, and make them work?
try to make these two work together?
This is first to replace the TNC,

http://uz7.ho.ua/packetradio.htm

Then this would be the mapping program to work with.

https://www.pinpointaprs.com/

Anyone?

I am close, I have the soundcard TNC thing working just fine, decodes the packets great.

I also have the mapping program also working great. It even says it is "Connected to the TNC"

BUT,,  the data being displayed by the soundmodem/TNC thing it's data is not getting plotted in the Map.

o the two programs are working, and the map sees the TNC,  but they are not sharing the map data. as seen here
<on.jpg>

I need someone better than I, to get these to work together, and then help me make my setup here do it too.

Joe WB9SBD


APRS

Joe WB9SBD
 

I am trying to get an APRS monitor system working. It is one that many recommend and says works great.
It does not need a TNC,

Anyone want to try to see if this works? Install them, and make them work?
try to make these two work together?
This is first to replace the TNC,

http://uz7.ho.ua/packetradio.htm

Then this would be the mapping program to work with.

https://www.pinpointaprs.com/

Anyone?

I am close, I have the soundcard TNC thing working just fine, decodes the packets great.

I also have the mapping program also working great. It even says it is "Connected to the TNC"

BUT,,  the data being displayed by the soundmodem/TNC thing it's data is not getting plotted in the Map.

o the two programs are working, and the map sees the TNC,  but they are not sharing the map data. as seen here


I need someone better than I, to get these to work together, and then help me make my setup here do it too.

Joe WB9SBD


Re: Coating Compounds for EMI/RFI Shielding

Joe WB9SBD
 

I us a similar one back in the 80's early 90's
it was not these people.

But it was a copper based type.

Joe WB9SBD

On 11/10/2021 3:09 PM, David Fields via groups.io wrote:
Hi Joe,
What recipe did you use? And do you think that Al powder (instead of silver) would work well?
Thx,
David N4HBO

On Nov 10, 2021, at 10:26, Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:


I used similar stuff like this in the past to make light weight yet shielded payload like the repeaters and such.

Master Bond Inc.


Having trouble viewing images? View email in browser


Coating
                                                          for EMI/RFI
                                                          Shielding

EMI/RFI Shielding Compounds

Coating systems for EMI/RFI shielding applications offer superior shielding performance properties to protect electronic devices from electromagnetic pulses. These systems protect against corrosion and bond well to many metals and plastics. Master Bond offers a variety of conductive filler materials to provide numerous resistance and attenuation levels.




Coatings for EMI/RFI Shielding Applications

 

 

 

Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP4S-80

EP4S-80

One part, low viscosity epoxy with superb dimensional stability

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP4G-80Med

EP4G-80Med

One part, medical grade, graphite filled epoxy cures at 80°C

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          MasterSil
                                                          151S

MasterSil 151S

Highly flexible, NASA low outgassing, silver filled silicone

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          MB600S

MB600S

One part, sodium silicate, aqueous based coating system

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP79FL

EP79FL

Silver coated nickel filled epoxy resists thermal cycling

Request a Technical Datasheet



Master
                                                          Bond Facebook
Master
                                                          Bond LinkedIn
Master
                                                          Bond Twitter
Master
                                                          Bond LinkedIn



Master Bond Inc. | www.masterbond.com | newsletters@... | +1.201.343.8983
154 Hobart Street, Hackensack, New Jersey 07601 USA


Copyright © 2021 by Master Bond Inc. All Rights Reserved.
This content may not be reproduced in any way without the prior written permission of Master Bond Inc.





Re: Coating Compounds for EMI/RFI Shielding

David Fields
 

Hi Joe,
What recipe did you use? And do you think that Al powder (instead of silver) would work well?
Thx,
David N4HBO

On Nov 10, 2021, at 10:26, Joe WB9SBD <nss@...> wrote:


I used similar stuff like this in the past to make light weight yet shielded payload like the repeaters and such.

Master Bond Inc.


Having trouble viewing images? View email in browser


Coating
                                                          for EMI/RFI
                                                          Shielding

EMI/RFI Shielding Compounds

Coating systems for EMI/RFI shielding applications offer superior shielding performance properties to protect electronic devices from electromagnetic pulses. These systems protect against corrosion and bond well to many metals and plastics. Master Bond offers a variety of conductive filler materials to provide numerous resistance and attenuation levels.




Coatings for EMI/RFI Shielding Applications

 

 

 

Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP4S-80

EP4S-80

One part, low viscosity epoxy with superb dimensional stability

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP4G-80Med

EP4G-80Med

One part, medical grade, graphite filled epoxy cures at 80°C

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          MasterSil
                                                          151S

MasterSil 151S

Highly flexible, NASA low outgassing, silver filled silicone

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          MB600S

MB600S

One part, sodium silicate, aqueous based coating system

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP79FL

EP79FL

Silver coated nickel filled epoxy resists thermal cycling

Request a Technical Datasheet



Master
                                                          Bond Facebook
Master
                                                          Bond LinkedIn
Master
                                                          Bond Twitter
Master
                                                          Bond LinkedIn



Master Bond Inc. | www.masterbond.com | newsletters@... | +1.201.343.8983
154 Hobart Street, Hackensack, New Jersey 07601 USA


Copyright © 2021 by Master Bond Inc. All Rights Reserved.
This content may not be reproduced in any way without the prior written permission of Master Bond Inc.




Coating Compounds for EMI/RFI Shielding

Joe WB9SBD
 


I used similar stuff like this in the past to make light weight yet shielded payload like the repeaters and such.

Master Bond Inc.


Having trouble viewing images? View email in browser


Coating
                                                          for EMI/RFI
                                                          Shielding

EMI/RFI Shielding Compounds

Coating systems for EMI/RFI shielding applications offer superior shielding performance properties to protect electronic devices from electromagnetic pulses. These systems protect against corrosion and bond well to many metals and plastics. Master Bond offers a variety of conductive filler materials to provide numerous resistance and attenuation levels.




Coatings for EMI/RFI Shielding Applications

 

 

 

Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP4S-80

EP4S-80

One part, low viscosity epoxy with superb dimensional stability

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP4G-80Med

EP4G-80Med

One part, medical grade, graphite filled epoxy cures at 80°C

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          MasterSil
                                                          151S

MasterSil 151S

Highly flexible, NASA low outgassing, silver filled silicone

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          MB600S

MB600S

One part, sodium silicate, aqueous based coating system

Request a Technical Datasheet


Master
                                                          Bond Product
                                                          EP79FL

EP79FL

Silver coated nickel filled epoxy resists thermal cycling

Request a Technical Datasheet



Master
                                                          Bond Facebook
Master
                                                          Bond LinkedIn
Master
                                                          Bond Twitter
Master
                                                          Bond LinkedIn



Master Bond Inc. | www.masterbond.com | newsletters@... | +1.201.343.8983
154 Hobart Street, Hackensack, New Jersey 07601 USA


Copyright © 2021 by Master Bond Inc. All Rights Reserved.
This content may not be reproduced in any way without the prior written permission of Master Bond Inc.




Service arrangements for Brian Tanner

Bill Brown
 

Brian Tanner of Spaceport Indiana passed away on Oct. 24th after 7 weeks on a ventilator with COVID.  Services will be Sunday November 7th with visitation starting at 2:30 pm and services at 3:30 pm at Flora First Christian Church, 8 East South St, Flora, Indiana.  For those coming earlier we will be meeting at Cosmos Coffee in Flora which is run by Brian and Lori.  

  I plan to be there and will be driving up from Alabama.

- Bill WB8ELK


Brian Tanner RIP

K. Mark Caviezel
 

He was a fine man, chipper and upbeat.  Sad to see him pass away so young.   - Mark



Re: Brian Tanner of Spaceport Indiana has passed away

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I am very sorry for your loss. I wish I had a chance to meet Brian in person.


On Tue, Oct 26, 2021, 6:28 PM Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
One of the best friends I have in the World, Brian Tanner, has passed away from COVID complications. Brian ran Spaceport Indiana and the Spaceport Exploration Centre in Bringhurst Indiana just north of Purdue University. This is the site for next year's GPSL.  I will discuss things with his wife Lori Tanner to see if we can still hold it there with my help and will let you all know. There will be a Celebration of Life event for Brian but no date set for that as yet. Brian and I have flown many high altitude balloons for students at his INSpace Camps each Summer as well as a number of balloon research projects and this will be a great loss for Indiana STEM programs.

- Bill WB8ELK





Re: Brian Tanner of Spaceport Indiana has passed away

Hank Riley
 

For some reason couldn't get both of these links to go in one post (the second link would replace the first and continue ad infinitum).

Brian Tanner obituary

201 - 220 of 18175