Date   

Re: Canadian radiosodes

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

James,

It appears EC is now using GPS sondes, and the radiosonde_auto_rx software (which can be run on an RPi) should be able to decode positions if not the full telemetry stream.  If they work like the LMS-6 sondes the NWS uses, you'll have position reports at 1-sec intervals.

Here's an example of one decoded by a station near Ottawa this morning:

Frequency band used is ~403 MHz.

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Fri, Sep 4, 2020 at 8:52 AM James Ewen VE6SRV <ve6srv@...> wrote:
Mark,

Carvel is the closest upper air sounding station. Before we launched our first balloon, we went for a tour of the station and saw how they filled and launched their balloons. We based our first fill device off of their design. 

We then chased and recovered a number of radiosondes. We had just moved into Sherwood Park, and my neighbors discovered they had a crazy neighbor early. 

I would be standing on the front lawn waving a UHF yogi at the sky, and then every few days, I would lay on the lawn staring at the sky with binoculars. Burst was observed visually as there was no way to decode telemetry. 

I learnt how to judge where the radiosonde would land based on where the balloon burst overhead. I was picky and only chased the ones that burst almost at my zenith. That meant they would land about 5 to 6 miles east of me. Burst west of my zenith meant a shorter drive, and deviations north or south of my zenith meant a north or south recovery. 

You needed to know where the sonde would land fairly precisely as the radio signal on the ground would only propagate about a mile or so. 

Toughest recovery was just a few miles south of us. We got to the area and could hear the sonde. Chased it down to a cow pasture behind a house, but the signal seemed to be moving on us. It ended up that the lift line got tangled around one cow’s leg,  and the sonde was going for a tour as the cow grazed. As luck would have it, cows are curious, and the herd came to see what these silly people were doing in the next field over. Serendipity helped as the tangled line came free as the transport cow decided we were not that interesting after all. 

James
VE6SRV 

On Fri, Sep 4, 2020 at 7:30 AM Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:
James - not sure where you're located relative to any Environment Canada upper-air sites, but you could build a radiosonde ground station and chase those!

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 9:24 PM James Ewen VE6SRV <ve6srv@...> wrote:


There haven’t been any balloons to chase around here with this silly pandemic. I’m getting bored!

James
VE6SRV 


Re: David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

Mark,

Carvel is the closest upper air sounding station. Before we launched our first balloon, we went for a tour of the station and saw how they filled and launched their balloons. We based our first fill device off of their design. 

We then chased and recovered a number of radiosondes. We had just moved into Sherwood Park, and my neighbors discovered they had a crazy neighbor early. 

I would be standing on the front lawn waving a UHF yogi at the sky, and then every few days, I would lay on the lawn staring at the sky with binoculars. Burst was observed visually as there was no way to decode telemetry. 

I learnt how to judge where the radiosonde would land based on where the balloon burst overhead. I was picky and only chased the ones that burst almost at my zenith. That meant they would land about 5 to 6 miles east of me. Burst west of my zenith meant a shorter drive, and deviations north or south of my zenith meant a north or south recovery. 

You needed to know where the sonde would land fairly precisely as the radio signal on the ground would only propagate about a mile or so. 

Toughest recovery was just a few miles south of us. We got to the area and could hear the sonde. Chased it down to a cow pasture behind a house, but the signal seemed to be moving on us. It ended up that the lift line got tangled around one cow’s leg,  and the sonde was going for a tour as the cow grazed. As luck would have it, cows are curious, and the herd came to see what these silly people were doing in the next field over. Serendipity helped as the tangled line came free as the transport cow decided we were not that interesting after all. 

James
VE6SRV 

On Fri, Sep 4, 2020 at 7:30 AM Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:
James - not sure where you're located relative to any Environment Canada upper-air sites, but you could build a radiosonde ground station and chase those!

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 9:24 PM James Ewen VE6SRV <ve6srv@...> wrote:


There haven’t been any balloons to chase around here with this silly pandemic. I’m getting bored!

James
VE6SRV 













--
James
VE6SRV


Re: David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

James - not sure where you're located relative to any Environment Canada upper-air sites, but you could build a radiosonde ground station and chase those!

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 9:24 PM James Ewen VE6SRV <ve6srv@...> wrote:


There haven’t been any balloons to chase around here with this silly pandemic. I’m getting bored!

James
VE6SRV 


Re: David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

I would have arm wrestled him for the chance to go up. Do you think we can find a sponsor to pay for the balloons and hydrogen? I’m not wasting money on helium. 

I’ve watched a number of jumps from hot air balloons. They say it’s a weird feeling to be starting from a stand still. Jumping from a plane, you’re jumping into a moving air mass. Even from a helicopter in a hover, there’s a lot of air moving downward in a hurry. From a balloon, you are basically at zero airspeed as you are drifting along with the wind. 

If someone said “We need a crash test dummy to drop out a balloon”, I’d have my hand up in a flash. 

There were probably a number of things that I missed on the first watch. There’s lots that I didn’t comment on in the previous email. 

There haven’t been any balloons to chase around here with this silly pandemic. I’m getting bored!

James
VE6SRV 

On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 7:41 PM Tony Rafaat <trafaat@...> wrote:
James, you should have been on his ground crew.  You certainly brought up some sensible points.

Be well.
Tony
VA6TNY


From: "James Ewen VE6SRV" <ve6srv@...>
To: GPSL@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 3 September, 2020 18:34:07
Subject: Re: [GPSL] David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

Which concluding part of the stunt? The helicopter ride back to the airport?

I would happily have taken his place. That would be a bucket list thing for me. If he had chickened out and I was on site, I would have told him to go hit the showers and would have grabbed on and been ready to go!

He was suffering from hypoxia just before going on oxygen. Trying to be a tough guy and making it to 20k before giving in. He was arguing saying he was fine, but he was getting giddy. As soon as he got on O2, his manner changed immediately. 

Lots of banter back and forth about what to do next, all involved should have had everything down pat. 

Dropping of sand bags from altitude is considered bombing. They should have used sandbags that could be opened and the ballast dropped. No chance of hitting something on the ground, and no need to recover the dropped ballast. 

No one could understand the difference between altitude and rate of climb. 

Upon release, it looked like he just fell in a stable arch, he should have been tracking back to the LZ. 3 miles from 25,000 feet should have been an easy return. I’ve covered a 2 mile track from 9,500. 

Asking if there are power lines by a road, and having ground support say “I can’t make any out on the image from your chest camera.” is pretty damned stupid. They should have had maps and already understood the obstructions in the area, both jumper and ground crew. The jumper has better visual than anything from a GoPro. 

Ground winds should have been understood. Anyone having flown under a steerable canopy knows how to look for ground wind tell tale signs. They also know to do a 360 before getting set up for landing to look for wind drift. 

The jumper did a poor job of choosing a landing area. He landed on some pretty rough terrain, and had to really run out the landing because he ended up in a downwind landing. 

Overall, the jump was successful, he was able to float up to altitude under a bunch of balloons. He was able to successfully *almost* miss the ground, the end goal of any skydive. 

Like just about anything you watch on TV, if you know nothing about the subject of the program, it can be entertaining and very impressive. 

When you are familiar with the subject matter however, you can usually find at least a handful of errors or problems. 

This stunt had me slapping my forehead quite often. 

One day if I’m really bored I might watch the fluff before lift off. I only watched from when they walked him from the fill area to the end. 

James
VE6SRV 


On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 4:15 PM Hank Riley via groups.io <n1ltv=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I forgot about this being a live streaming event exclusively on Youtube "Originals."

It happened yesterday in Page, AZ.  He reached ~ 24,900 feet ASL before cutting loose.

Curious if any skydivers are on list and would like to comment on that concluding part of the stunt. 

Hank










--
James
VE6SRV













--
James
VE6SRV


Re: David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

Tony Rafaat
 

James, you should have been on his ground crew.  You certainly brought up some sensible points.

Be well.
Tony
VA6TNY


From: "James Ewen VE6SRV" <ve6srv@...>
To: GPSL@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 3 September, 2020 18:34:07
Subject: Re: [GPSL] David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

Which concluding part of the stunt? The helicopter ride back to the airport?

I would happily have taken his place. That would be a bucket list thing for me. If he had chickened out and I was on site, I would have told him to go hit the showers and would have grabbed on and been ready to go!

He was suffering from hypoxia just before going on oxygen. Trying to be a tough guy and making it to 20k before giving in. He was arguing saying he was fine, but he was getting giddy. As soon as he got on O2, his manner changed immediately. 

Lots of banter back and forth about what to do next, all involved should have had everything down pat. 

Dropping of sand bags from altitude is considered bombing. They should have used sandbags that could be opened and the ballast dropped. No chance of hitting something on the ground, and no need to recover the dropped ballast. 

No one could understand the difference between altitude and rate of climb. 

Upon release, it looked like he just fell in a stable arch, he should have been tracking back to the LZ. 3 miles from 25,000 feet should have been an easy return. I’ve covered a 2 mile track from 9,500. 

Asking if there are power lines by a road, and having ground support say “I can’t make any out on the image from your chest camera.” is pretty damned stupid. They should have had maps and already understood the obstructions in the area, both jumper and ground crew. The jumper has better visual than anything from a GoPro. 

Ground winds should have been understood. Anyone having flown under a steerable canopy knows how to look for ground wind tell tale signs. They also know to do a 360 before getting set up for landing to look for wind drift. 

The jumper did a poor job of choosing a landing area. He landed on some pretty rough terrain, and had to really run out the landing because he ended up in a downwind landing. 

Overall, the jump was successful, he was able to float up to altitude under a bunch of balloons. He was able to successfully *almost* miss the ground, the end goal of any skydive. 

Like just about anything you watch on TV, if you know nothing about the subject of the program, it can be entertaining and very impressive. 

When you are familiar with the subject matter however, you can usually find at least a handful of errors or problems. 

This stunt had me slapping my forehead quite often. 

One day if I’m really bored I might watch the fluff before lift off. I only watched from when they walked him from the fill area to the end. 

James
VE6SRV 


On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 4:15 PM Hank Riley via groups.io <n1ltv=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I forgot about this being a live streaming event exclusively on Youtube "Originals."

It happened yesterday in Page, AZ.  He reached ~ 24,900 feet ASL before cutting loose.

Curious if any skydivers are on list and would like to comment on that concluding part of the stunt. 

Hank










--
James
VE6SRV


Re: David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

Hank Riley
 

"Curious if any skydivers are on list and would like to comment on that concluding part of the stunt."

Identification of the concluding part is left as an exercise for the reader.   Hint:  S*Y*IVE.    :)
____________________________________________________________________________


On Thursday, September 3, 2020, 08:34:22 PM EDT, James wrote:

Which concluding part of the stunt? The helicopter ride back to the airport?


Re: David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

Which concluding part of the stunt? The helicopter ride back to the airport?

I would happily have taken his place. That would be a bucket list thing for me. If he had chickened out and I was on site, I would have told him to go hit the showers and would have grabbed on and been ready to go!

He was suffering from hypoxia just before going on oxygen. Trying to be a tough guy and making it to 20k before giving in. He was arguing saying he was fine, but he was getting giddy. As soon as he got on O2, his manner changed immediately. 

Lots of banter back and forth about what to do next, all involved should have had everything down pat. 

Dropping of sand bags from altitude is considered bombing. They should have used sandbags that could be opened and the ballast dropped. No chance of hitting something on the ground, and no need to recover the dropped ballast. 

No one could understand the difference between altitude and rate of climb. 

Upon release, it looked like he just fell in a stable arch, he should have been tracking back to the LZ. 3 miles from 25,000 feet should have been an easy return. I’ve covered a 2 mile track from 9,500. 

Asking if there are power lines by a road, and having ground support say “I can’t make any out on the image from your chest camera.” is pretty damned stupid. They should have had maps and already understood the obstructions in the area, both jumper and ground crew. The jumper has better visual than anything from a GoPro. 

Ground winds should have been understood. Anyone having flown under a steerable canopy knows how to look for ground wind tell tale signs. They also know to do a 360 before getting set up for landing to look for wind drift. 

The jumper did a poor job of choosing a landing area. He landed on some pretty rough terrain, and had to really run out the landing because he ended up in a downwind landing. 

Overall, the jump was successful, he was able to float up to altitude under a bunch of balloons. He was able to successfully *almost* miss the ground, the end goal of any skydive. 

Like just about anything you watch on TV, if you know nothing about the subject of the program, it can be entertaining and very impressive. 

When you are familiar with the subject matter however, you can usually find at least a handful of errors or problems. 

This stunt had me slapping my forehead quite often. 

One day if I’m really bored I might watch the fluff before lift off. I only watched from when they walked him from the fill area to the end. 

James
VE6SRV 


On Thu, Sep 3, 2020 at 4:15 PM Hank Riley via groups.io <n1ltv=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I forgot about this being a live streaming event exclusively on Youtube "Originals."

It happened yesterday in Page, AZ.  He reached ~ 24,900 feet ASL before cutting loose.

Curious if any skydivers are on list and would like to comment on that concluding part of the stunt. 

Hank










--
James
VE6SRV


David Blaine rises to ~ 20,000 feet AGL hanging under a cluster of 52 latex balloons

Hank Riley
 

I forgot about this being a live streaming event exclusively on Youtube "Originals."

It happened yesterday in Page, AZ.  He reached ~ 24,900 feet ASL before cutting loose.

Curious if any skydivers are on list and would like to comment on that concluding part of the stunt. 

Hank



Fun Story.

Keith Kaiser, WA0̷TJT
 


Re: Are there any HAB Clubs/organizations or activities in Missouri?

Jason Unwin
 

Thank you. 


On Wed, Aug 26, 2020 at 9:16, Carlton Corbitt via groups.io
<ccccrnr@...> wrote:
Hi Jason,

The question of are the Balloon groups in Missouri is a YES,  but if the question was are there very active HAB groups... maybe not so much

check 
that is a group in St Louis that is probably the most active in the state of MO.

Keith Keiser and others in Kansas City, MO did HAB balloons, but have mostly slowed down to doing them at Boy Scout Jamboree's

RoboMo - the st louis robotics club use to do them, but due to job changes and death among the primary HABer's hasn't done a flight in a while.

There is also a 4H club in Columbia MO that was focusing on space and STEM education a number of years ago, that released balloons and needed people to help chase down and return their projects.  But I haven't heard of them releasing any balloons in a few years.

Missouri may have other Near Space groups i don't know about as well.   However with the covid pandemic i suspect most groups are on hold for now.

Carlton
KI4NHK


Re: Are there any HAB Clubs/organizations or activities in Missouri?

Carlton Corbitt
 

Hi Jason,

The question of are the Balloon groups in Missouri is a YES,  but if the question was are there very active HAB groups... maybe not so much

check 
that is a group in St Louis that is probably the most active in the state of MO.

Keith Keiser and others in Kansas City, MO did HAB balloons, but have mostly slowed down to doing them at Boy Scout Jamboree's

RoboMo - the st louis robotics club use to do them, but due to job changes and death among the primary HABer's hasn't done a flight in a while.

There is also a 4H club in Columbia MO that was focusing on space and STEM education a number of years ago, that released balloons and needed people to help chase down and return their projects.  But I haven't heard of them releasing any balloons in a few years.

Missouri may have other Near Space groups i don't know about as well.   However with the covid pandemic i suspect most groups are on hold for now.

Carlton
KI4NHK


Are there any HAB Clubs/organizations or activities in Missouri?

Jason Unwin
 

I was looking at the ARHAB page for clubs and organizations that do HAB. Evidently it is not up to date.  I am moving to Missouri in the next few months to either the Sedalia or Lincoln MO area. I have helped in recovery teams with EOSS, PARK and Stratocasters down in Texas. I was at GPSL when it was in Texas a few years ago. Oklahoma doesn't seem to have anything going on. Our CAP squadron "hitched rides" on PARK flights.

If there are any people that fly in Missouri, I would like to work with them.

Jason Unwin
KF5UEF


Re: calculate elevation

Michael Hojnowski
 

What's your preferred programing language.  I suspect their are Perl and Python one-liners that'll do that if you include the right library.

Mike

On 8/23/2020 1:23 PM, Joe WB9SBD wrote:

geez 20+ years ago I had a .BAS program where if I put into it my lat/long/alt, and a second lat/long/alt it would spit out a az and el of where the balloon would be in my sky.

is there a way to do this nowdays?

I have a project loon balloon coming towards me and want to try to spot it later.

Joe WB9SBD



Re: calculate elevation

Will Halphen
 

From: GPSL@groups.io [mailto:GPSL@groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe WB9SBD
Sent: Sunday, August 23, 2020 1:23 PM
To: GPSL <GPSL@groups.io>
Subject: [GPSL] calculate elevation

 


geez 20+ years ago I had a .BAS program where if I put into it my lat/long/alt, and a second lat/long/alt it would spit out a az and el of where the balloon would be in my sky.

is there a way to do this nowdays?

I have a project loon balloon coming towards me and want to try to spot it later.

Joe WB9SBD


calculate elevation

Joe WB9SBD
 


geez 20+ years ago I had a .BAS program where if I put into it my lat/long/alt, and a second lat/long/alt it would spit out a az and el of where the balloon would be in my sky.

is there a way to do this nowdays?

I have a project loon balloon coming towards me and want to try to spot it later.

Joe WB9SBD


Re: Balloons This Morning

Barry
 

Don’t forget that they are easiest to see when the sun is at your back and they are therefore brightly illuminated by the sun. (If the sun is on the other side of the balloon it will likely be too dim to see, at least I’ve never been able to spot one unless the sun is behind me.)

 

Barry
VE6SBS

 

From: GPSL@groups.io [mailto:GPSL@groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe WB9SBD
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 8:24 AM
To: GPSL
Subject: [GPSL] Balloons This Morning

 

Looks like three were launched by Ravens this morning!

Depending on where they go I may be able to see them.
https://www.flightradar24.com/HBAL04/25366d23

Joe WB9SBD


Balloons This Morning

Joe WB9SBD
 

Looks like three were launched by Ravens this morning!

Depending on where they go I may be able to see them.
https://www.flightradar24.com/HBAL04/25366d23

Joe WB9SBD


Surfs Up 9 Flight Report/The Selfie Mission

Chief Surfer
 

Greetings!

The Selfie Mission, conceived in 2013, started with simple experiments.  Over a multi-year period, the design and payload emerged into something flyable.  I invite you to read this brief review of the Selfie Mission.



Thanks!

Joe
Chief Surfer
Surfing Satellites


Re: Interesting discussion on gas diffusion in rubber

Medad rufus
 

interesting

On Thu, 6 Aug 2020 at 10:37, steve@... via groups.io <steve=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNmmX83xIGM&t=3m16s

not what I expected.


Interesting discussion on gas diffusion in rubber

steve@btinternet.com
 

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