Date   

Update on GPSL videos

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

We're in the final stages of having the videos ready on the "GPSL Live" channel at YouTube.  Some are available now, and more will be coming soon.  Thanks to Jim Emmert for editing the Zoom videos into neat packages.


We will also be making the slides available, stand by for those details.

73 de Mark N9XTN


Re: K5NOT-11 WSPR Balloon Failure

Steve G8KHW / AJ4XE
 

Looks like that link does not work - search for the paper "Characteristics and Performance of Three Low-Cost Superpressure Balloon (Tetroon) Systems "

    Steve

On 18/07/2020 19:40, Steve G8KHW / AJ4XE wrote:

See the ping-pong valve described here:

    https://tinyurl.com/y5ukveyb

see fig 4

    Steve


On 18/07/2020 18:53, Jerry via groups.io wrote:
It seems like over inflation is a common problem.  Could we come up with a simple (and light) pressure releif valve that is inseted in the fill tube?  Maybe something that could be 3d printed.  You could also use overfill for a faster initial climb.  It might save a lot of balloons. 

Jerry


On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 10:31 AM, Michael
<mw@...> wrote:
Hi All,

I plotted the ascent and unexpected descent of the GPSL K5NOT-11 WSPR balloon I sent up. It was a WSPR Skytracker and SBS-13 balloon of which I had trouble sealing - the sealing unit recommended was not available and an equivalent unit melted the neck right off. The equivalent unit was likely defective and too hot. I had eventually sealed the neck and folded it up like we do with latex balloons. I felt it was probably OK to fly. However, after a short time at 43,000 ft float level the balloon came back down. I assumed the premature descent to be caused from where I sealed it.

However, something about the descent did not make sense. If the leak was at the bottom - at the seal, I would expect the balloon to descend some portion and then somewhat stabilize at a fair altitude as the helium would want to stay at the top of the envelope and not flow down and out at the filling neck. Instead it descended all the way on a very linear line. I now highly suspect the leak actually was a pinhole or larger that developed in flight at or near the top of the envelope as a very under-inflated envelope with positive buoyancy took the payload aloft. The balloon was filled to 7 grams of positive lift.

According to the ascent table provided by Scientific Balloons - who makes the SBS-13, 5-8gr of lift is the sweet spot. I measured the lift in several different ways and confirmed 7 gr lift. However, based on the table also provided by Scientific Balloons, the 7gr of lift should result in less than 1.3 meters of ascent rate. When I calculated the time from launch to float I came up with 1.77 meters / second ascent rate which does not agree with the 1.3 meters targeted, but rather reflects over 10 gr but less than 12 gr of free lift which is too much.

What I learned from premature descent of the K5NOT-11 balloon via the NTSB (North Texas Squirrely Balloon) analysis:
  • Free lift was most likely the culprit causing an over pressure envelope failure at the top of the envelope and not caused by a bad seal at the neck. The free lift was measured with a 0.1gr repeatable accuracy, but does not match up with the tables provided by Scientific Balloons, so an error / discrepancy / calibration issue crept in here in some manner.
  • Even though the sealer was a bear, it eventually sealed - and folding and taping probably was good as extra insurance.
  • When you seal one of these balloons, try sealing on the very end of the neck first to prove the seal process before sealing where you actually want the seal.
  • Science can be fun until your hope of achievement is overwhelmed by the realization of complete failure.
--Michael


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: K5NOT-11 WSPR Balloon Failure

Steve G8KHW / AJ4XE
 

See the ping-pong valve described here:

    https://tinyurl.com/y5ukveyb

see fig 4

    Steve


On 18/07/2020 18:53, Jerry via groups.io wrote:
It seems like over inflation is a common problem.  Could we come up with a simple (and light) pressure releif valve that is inseted in the fill tube?  Maybe something that could be 3d printed.  You could also use overfill for a faster initial climb.  It might save a lot of balloons. 

Jerry


On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 10:31 AM, Michael
<mw@...> wrote:
Hi All,

I plotted the ascent and unexpected descent of the GPSL K5NOT-11 WSPR balloon I sent up. It was a WSPR Skytracker and SBS-13 balloon of which I had trouble sealing - the sealing unit recommended was not available and an equivalent unit melted the neck right off. The equivalent unit was likely defective and too hot. I had eventually sealed the neck and folded it up like we do with latex balloons. I felt it was probably OK to fly. However, after a short time at 43,000 ft float level the balloon came back down. I assumed the premature descent to be caused from where I sealed it.

However, something about the descent did not make sense. If the leak was at the bottom - at the seal, I would expect the balloon to descend some portion and then somewhat stabilize at a fair altitude as the helium would want to stay at the top of the envelope and not flow down and out at the filling neck. Instead it descended all the way on a very linear line. I now highly suspect the leak actually was a pinhole or larger that developed in flight at or near the top of the envelope as a very under-inflated envelope with positive buoyancy took the payload aloft. The balloon was filled to 7 grams of positive lift.

According to the ascent table provided by Scientific Balloons - who makes the SBS-13, 5-8gr of lift is the sweet spot. I measured the lift in several different ways and confirmed 7 gr lift. However, based on the table also provided by Scientific Balloons, the 7gr of lift should result in less than 1.3 meters of ascent rate. When I calculated the time from launch to float I came up with 1.77 meters / second ascent rate which does not agree with the 1.3 meters targeted, but rather reflects over 10 gr but less than 12 gr of free lift which is too much.

What I learned from premature descent of the K5NOT-11 balloon via the NTSB (North Texas Squirrely Balloon) analysis:
  • Free lift was most likely the culprit causing an over pressure envelope failure at the top of the envelope and not caused by a bad seal at the neck. The free lift was measured with a 0.1gr repeatable accuracy, but does not match up with the tables provided by Scientific Balloons, so an error / discrepancy / calibration issue crept in here in some manner.
  • Even though the sealer was a bear, it eventually sealed - and folding and taping probably was good as extra insurance.
  • When you seal one of these balloons, try sealing on the very end of the neck first to prove the seal process before sealing where you actually want the seal.
  • Science can be fun until your hope of achievement is overwhelmed by the realization of complete failure.
--Michael


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: K5NOT-11 WSPR Balloon Failure

Jerry
 

It seems like over inflation is a common problem.  Could we come up with a simple (and light) pressure releif valve that is inseted in the fill tube?  Maybe something that could be 3d printed.  You could also use overfill for a faster initial climb.  It might save a lot of balloons. 

Jerry


On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 10:31 AM, Michael
<mw@...> wrote:
Hi All,

I plotted the ascent and unexpected descent of the GPSL K5NOT-11 WSPR balloon I sent up. It was a WSPR Skytracker and SBS-13 balloon of which I had trouble sealing - the sealing unit recommended was not available and an equivalent unit melted the neck right off. The equivalent unit was likely defective and too hot. I had eventually sealed the neck and folded it up like we do with latex balloons. I felt it was probably OK to fly. However, after a short time at 43,000 ft float level the balloon came back down. I assumed the premature descent to be caused from where I sealed it.

However, something about the descent did not make sense. If the leak was at the bottom - at the seal, I would expect the balloon to descend some portion and then somewhat stabilize at a fair altitude as the helium would want to stay at the top of the envelope and not flow down and out at the filling neck. Instead it descended all the way on a very linear line. I now highly suspect the leak actually was a pinhole or larger that developed in flight at or near the top of the envelope as a very under-inflated envelope with positive buoyancy took the payload aloft. The balloon was filled to 7 grams of positive lift.

According to the ascent table provided by Scientific Balloons - who makes the SBS-13, 5-8gr of lift is the sweet spot. I measured the lift in several different ways and confirmed 7 gr lift. However, based on the table also provided by Scientific Balloons, the 7gr of lift should result in less than 1.3 meters of ascent rate. When I calculated the time from launch to float I came up with 1.77 meters / second ascent rate which does not agree with the 1.3 meters targeted, but rather reflects over 10 gr but less than 12 gr of free lift which is too much.

What I learned from premature descent of the K5NOT-11 balloon via the NTSB (North Texas Squirrely Balloon) analysis:
  • Free lift was most likely the culprit causing an over pressure envelope failure at the top of the envelope and not caused by a bad seal at the neck. The free lift was measured with a 0.1gr repeatable accuracy, but does not match up with the tables provided by Scientific Balloons, so an error / discrepancy / calibration issue crept in here in some manner.
  • Even though the sealer was a bear, it eventually sealed - and folding and taping probably was good as extra insurance.
  • When you seal one of these balloons, try sealing on the very end of the neck first to prove the seal process before sealing where you actually want the seal.
  • Science can be fun until your hope of achievement is overwhelmed by the realization of complete failure.
--Michael


K5NOT-11 WSPR Balloon Failure

Michael
 

Hi All,

I plotted the ascent and unexpected descent of the GPSL K5NOT-11 WSPR balloon I sent up. It was a WSPR Skytracker and SBS-13 balloon of which I had trouble sealing - the sealing unit recommended was not available and an equivalent unit melted the neck right off. The equivalent unit was likely defective and too hot. I had eventually sealed the neck and folded it up like we do with latex balloons. I felt it was probably OK to fly. However, after a short time at 43,000 ft float level the balloon came back down. I assumed the premature descent to be caused from where I sealed it.

However, something about the descent did not make sense. If the leak was at the bottom - at the seal, I would expect the balloon to descend some portion and then somewhat stabilize at a fair altitude as the helium would want to stay at the top of the envelope and not flow down and out at the filling neck. Instead it descended all the way on a very linear line. I now highly suspect the leak actually was a pinhole or larger that developed in flight at or near the top of the envelope as a very under-inflated envelope with positive buoyancy took the payload aloft. The balloon was filled to 7 grams of positive lift.

According to the ascent table provided by Scientific Balloons - who makes the SBS-13, 5-8gr of lift is the sweet spot. I measured the lift in several different ways and confirmed 7 gr lift. However, based on the table also provided by Scientific Balloons, the 7gr of lift should result in less than 1.3 meters of ascent rate. When I calculated the time from launch to float I came up with 1.77 meters / second ascent rate which does not agree with the 1.3 meters targeted, but rather reflects over 10 gr but less than 12 gr of free lift which is too much.

What I learned from premature descent of the K5NOT-11 balloon via the NTSB (North Texas Squirrely Balloon) analysis:
  • Free lift was most likely the culprit causing an over pressure envelope failure at the top of the envelope and not caused by a bad seal at the neck. The free lift was measured with a 0.1gr repeatable accuracy, but does not match up with the tables provided by Scientific Balloons, so an error / discrepancy / calibration issue crept in here in some manner.
  • Even though the sealer was a bear, it eventually sealed - and folding and taping probably was good as extra insurance.
  • When you seal one of these balloons, try sealing on the very end of the neck first to prove the seal process before sealing where you actually want the seal.
  • Science can be fun until your hope of achievement is overwhelmed by the realization of complete failure.
--Michael


Re: KQ6RS1 WSPR Buoy has been deployed in the Pacific Ocean SW of San Diego

Bill Brown
 

Yep it is right....ocean currents are slow where it is currently located.

- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: greg@... <greg@...>
To: GPSL@groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jul 17, 2020 5:37 pm
Subject: Re: [GPSL] KQ6RS1 WSPR Buoy has been deployed in the Pacific Ocean SW of San Diego

It doesn't appear to be moving much at all, can that be right?

Greg K7RKT


Re: KQ6RS1 WSPR Buoy has been deployed in the Pacific Ocean SW of San Diego

greg@bigredbee.com
 

It doesn't appear to be moving much at all, can that be right?

Greg K7RKT


Re: GPSL Pico balloons status update KM6BWB10 back in CA

Ryan Butler
 

It's here!  Moving at a good clip too!


On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 2:50 PM Harry M <hhm_74115@...> wrote:
KM6BWB-10 will be over Iowa shortly.


Re: GPSL Pico balloons status update KM6BWB10 back in CA

Harry M
 

KM6BWB-10 will be over Iowa shortly.


Re: GPSL Pico balloons status update KM6BWB10 back in CA

Bill Brown
 

Floyd,

  You can see all of the balloons currently flying in the World at:   tracker.habhub.org    or enter the GPSL callsigns of the balloons still flying on APRS.FI separated by commas.  KM6BWB-10 and KC7VQR-11 are still flying.



- Bill WB8ELK




-----Original Message-----
From: Floyd Rodgers <kc5qbc@...>
To: GPSL@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jul 16, 2020 7:52 pm
Subject: Re: [GPSL] GPSL Pico balloons status update KM6BWB10 back in CA

What’s the trick or how can I find all the flyers on aprs or what ever tracking method. Dummies guide to balloon tracking....

Floyd KC5QBC

On Jul 16, 2020, at 7:35 PM, Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...> wrote:


UPDATE:

KM6BWB-10 returned to California today after a big loop into Mexico and out into the Pacific near Baja. Still flying high !!!

- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...>
To: gpsl@groups.io <gpsl@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jul 16, 2020 11:06 am
Subject: [GPSL] GPSL Pico balloons status updates

Out of the 10 Pico Balloons that were launched last Saturday for GPSL (2 on Sunday), one is currently being received as it flies over Bulgaria (KC7VQR-11) and two more may still be flying but out of range of APRS ground stations. Here's the status of all of the balloons so far:

Still flying or potentially still flying:
KC7VQR-11 (APRS Skytracker with SBS-13 balloon) - Currently flying over Bulgaria. 7 grams of free lift with helium.
KM6BWB-10 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons - Last heard in Mexico, if it is still flying it should show up back in CA/AZ on 7/18 @ 2200z.
KK6UUQ-7 (APRS SKytracker with single foil balloon - Launched, burst, recovered from a field then flown again within a few hours and last heard SW of New Orleans. Predicted to show up 7/18 @ 1200z in east TX

On the ground:
VA5BNC-15 (APRS custom built by Bruce VE5BNC - 25 grams on a single foil balloon) - Landed in east GA, then took off again the next morning and landed near Orangeburg SC.
WB8ELK-10 (APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon) - Hit bad storms along NC coast not far from Kitty Hawk and looks like it splashed down a half mile from shore.
KM4ZIA-2 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
KM4BUN-1 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
K5NOT-11 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Had trouble heat sealing the filling port so likely caused leak after 20 minutes of float time. Landed in central TX.
W5HRH-15 (WSPR board on SBS-13 balloon) -  10 grams of free lift, anything over 8 grams has more risk. if it works it will work very well but increased risk of leaking as it achieves float altitude. It burst and came down in South Texas. I did have one work great with 11 grams of free lift but that's the upper limit. The most recent successes I have observed have had between 6.5 and 7.5 grams free lift.

Not Sure if still flying:
K7HAK-11 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons) - Likely landed in SC where there were a lot of storms. Didn't show up over Newfoundland per prediction but may still be aloft. If it doesn't show up in Europe within two days from now then it probably landed in SC.

GPSL balloons launched on Sunday:
Also W7EEU-11 launched an APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon on Sunday since he couldn't launch on Saturday during our big event. It had a wild roller coaster ride after picking up some icing but finally reached a stable float on the second day. It was heading into northern Canada and may show up again in a few days in Europe if it is still flying.
K6STS launched a WSPR payload on an SBS-13 on Sunday as part of GPSL but it came down shortly about 2 miles from his house. He has recovered it and will fly again soon.

- Bill WB8ELK





Re: GPSL Pico balloons status update KM6BWB10 back in CA

Floyd Rodgers
 

What’s the trick or how can I find all the flyers on aprs or what ever tracking method. Dummies guide to balloon tracking....

Floyd KC5QBC

On Jul 16, 2020, at 7:35 PM, Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...> wrote:


UPDATE:

KM6BWB-10 returned to California today after a big loop into Mexico and out into the Pacific near Baja. Still flying high !!!

- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...>
To: gpsl@groups.io <gpsl@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jul 16, 2020 11:06 am
Subject: [GPSL] GPSL Pico balloons status updates

Out of the 10 Pico Balloons that were launched last Saturday for GPSL (2 on Sunday), one is currently being received as it flies over Bulgaria (KC7VQR-11) and two more may still be flying but out of range of APRS ground stations. Here's the status of all of the balloons so far:

Still flying or potentially still flying:
KC7VQR-11 (APRS Skytracker with SBS-13 balloon) - Currently flying over Bulgaria. 7 grams of free lift with helium.
KM6BWB-10 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons - Last heard in Mexico, if it is still flying it should show up back in CA/AZ on 7/18 @ 2200z.
KK6UUQ-7 (APRS SKytracker with single foil balloon - Launched, burst, recovered from a field then flown again within a few hours and last heard SW of New Orleans. Predicted to show up 7/18 @ 1200z in east TX

On the ground:
VA5BNC-15 (APRS custom built by Bruce VE5BNC - 25 grams on a single foil balloon) - Landed in east GA, then took off again the next morning and landed near Orangeburg SC.
WB8ELK-10 (APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon) - Hit bad storms along NC coast not far from Kitty Hawk and looks like it splashed down a half mile from shore.
KM4ZIA-2 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
KM4BUN-1 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
K5NOT-11 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Had trouble heat sealing the filling port so likely caused leak after 20 minutes of float time. Landed in central TX.
W5HRH-15 (WSPR board on SBS-13 balloon) -  10 grams of free lift, anything over 8 grams has more risk. if it works it will work very well but increased risk of leaking as it achieves float altitude. It burst and came down in South Texas. I did have one work great with 11 grams of free lift but that's the upper limit. The most recent successes I have observed have had between 6.5 and 7.5 grams free lift.

Not Sure if still flying:
K7HAK-11 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons) - Likely landed in SC where there were a lot of storms. Didn't show up over Newfoundland per prediction but may still be aloft. If it doesn't show up in Europe within two days from now then it probably landed in SC.

GPSL balloons launched on Sunday:
Also W7EEU-11 launched an APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon on Sunday since he couldn't launch on Saturday during our big event. It had a wild roller coaster ride after picking up some icing but finally reached a stable float on the second day. It was heading into northern Canada and may show up again in a few days in Europe if it is still flying.
K6STS launched a WSPR payload on an SBS-13 on Sunday as part of GPSL but it came down shortly about 2 miles from his house. He has recovered it and will fly again soon.

- Bill WB8ELK





Re: GPSL Pico balloons status update KM6BWB10 back in CA

Bill Brown
 


UPDATE:

KM6BWB-10 returned to California today after a big loop into Mexico and out into the Pacific near Baja. Still flying high !!!

- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...>
To: gpsl@groups.io <gpsl@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jul 16, 2020 11:06 am
Subject: [GPSL] GPSL Pico balloons status updates

Out of the 10 Pico Balloons that were launched last Saturday for GPSL (2 on Sunday), one is currently being received as it flies over Bulgaria (KC7VQR-11) and two more may still be flying but out of range of APRS ground stations. Here's the status of all of the balloons so far:

Still flying or potentially still flying:
KC7VQR-11 (APRS Skytracker with SBS-13 balloon) - Currently flying over Bulgaria. 7 grams of free lift with helium.
KM6BWB-10 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons - Last heard in Mexico, if it is still flying it should show up back in CA/AZ on 7/18 @ 2200z.
KK6UUQ-7 (APRS SKytracker with single foil balloon - Launched, burst, recovered from a field then flown again within a few hours and last heard SW of New Orleans. Predicted to show up 7/18 @ 1200z in east TX

On the ground:
VA5BNC-15 (APRS custom built by Bruce VE5BNC - 25 grams on a single foil balloon) - Landed in east GA, then took off again the next morning and landed near Orangeburg SC.
WB8ELK-10 (APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon) - Hit bad storms along NC coast not far from Kitty Hawk and looks like it splashed down a half mile from shore.
KM4ZIA-2 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
KM4BUN-1 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
K5NOT-11 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Had trouble heat sealing the filling port so likely caused leak after 20 minutes of float time. Landed in central TX.
W5HRH-15 (WSPR board on SBS-13 balloon) -  10 grams of free lift, anything over 8 grams has more risk. if it works it will work very well but increased risk of leaking as it achieves float altitude. It burst and came down in South Texas. I did have one work great with 11 grams of free lift but that's the upper limit. The most recent successes I have observed have had between 6.5 and 7.5 grams free lift.

Not Sure if still flying:
K7HAK-11 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons) - Likely landed in SC where there were a lot of storms. Didn't show up over Newfoundland per prediction but may still be aloft. If it doesn't show up in Europe within two days from now then it probably landed in SC.

GPSL balloons launched on Sunday:
Also W7EEU-11 launched an APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon on Sunday since he couldn't launch on Saturday during our big event. It had a wild roller coaster ride after picking up some icing but finally reached a stable float on the second day. It was heading into northern Canada and may show up again in a few days in Europe if it is still flying.
K6STS launched a WSPR payload on an SBS-13 on Sunday as part of GPSL but it came down shortly about 2 miles from his house. He has recovered it and will fly again soon.

- Bill WB8ELK





Re: KQ6RS1 WSPR Buoy has been deployed in the Pacific Ocean SW of San Diego

Bill Brown
 

Hi Mark...it is floating with the currents.

- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: Garrett, Mark <ma-garrett@...>
To: GPSL@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jul 16, 2020 3:05 pm
Subject: Re: [GPSL] KQ6RS1 WSPR Buoy has been deployed in the Pacific Ocean SW of San Diego

Is this a floating with the currents type buoy or is it anchored?


On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 3:01 PM Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
KQ6RS and students have developed a WSPR buoy using a Skytracker WSPR board attached to 6 months worth of batteries and a loaded whip antenna. It was just deployed by a research boat about 380 miles SW of San Diego and is getting great WSPR coverage.  KQ6RS on WSPR,  KQ6RS-1 on APRS.FI ported with my Python program.

- Bill WB8ELK



--
Mark Garrett
Tri States Public Radio
WIUM Macomb, IL
WIUW Warsaw, IL
WVKC Galesburg, IL
K292GR Burlington, IA
Office (309) 298-1104
Cell    (309) 255-6987
Fax    (309) 298-2133


Re: KQ6RS1 WSPR Buoy has been deployed in the Pacific Ocean SW of San Diego

Garrett, Mark
 

Is this a floating with the currents type buoy or is it anchored?


On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 3:01 PM Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
KQ6RS and students have developed a WSPR buoy using a Skytracker WSPR board attached to 6 months worth of batteries and a loaded whip antenna. It was just deployed by a research boat about 380 miles SW of San Diego and is getting great WSPR coverage.  KQ6RS on WSPR,  KQ6RS-1 on APRS.FI ported with my Python program.

- Bill WB8ELK



--
Mark Garrett
Tri States Public Radio
WIUM Macomb, IL
WIUW Warsaw, IL
WVKC Galesburg, IL
K292GR Burlington, IA
Office (309) 298-1104
Cell    (309) 255-6987
Fax    (309) 298-2133


KQ6RS1 WSPR Buoy has been deployed in the Pacific Ocean SW of San Diego

Bill Brown
 

KQ6RS and students have developed a WSPR buoy using a Skytracker WSPR board attached to 6 months worth of batteries and a loaded whip antenna. It was just deployed by a research boat about 380 miles SW of San Diego and is getting great WSPR coverage.  KQ6RS on WSPR,  KQ6RS-1 on APRS.FI ported with my Python program.

- Bill WB8ELK


GPSL Pico balloons status updates

Bill Brown
 

Out of the 10 Pico Balloons that were launched last Saturday for GPSL (2 on Sunday), one is currently being received as it flies over Bulgaria (KC7VQR-11) and two more may still be flying but out of range of APRS ground stations. Here's the status of all of the balloons so far:

Still flying or potentially still flying:
KC7VQR-11 (APRS Skytracker with SBS-13 balloon) - Currently flying over Bulgaria. 7 grams of free lift with helium.
KM6BWB-10 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons - Last heard in Mexico, if it is still flying it should show up back in CA/AZ on 7/18 @ 2200z.
KK6UUQ-7 (APRS SKytracker with single foil balloon - Launched, burst, recovered from a field then flown again within a few hours and last heard SW of New Orleans. Predicted to show up 7/18 @ 1200z in east TX

On the ground:
VA5BNC-15 (APRS custom built by Bruce VE5BNC - 25 grams on a single foil balloon) - Landed in east GA, then took off again the next morning and landed near Orangeburg SC.
WB8ELK-10 (APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon) - Hit bad storms along NC coast not far from Kitty Hawk and looks like it splashed down a half mile from shore.
KM4ZIA-2 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
KM4BUN-1 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Hit bad storms off the coast of NC and probably splashed down in the Atlantic.
K5NOT-11 (WSPR Skytracker on SBS-13 balloon) - Had trouble heat sealing the filling port so likely caused leak after 20 minutes of float time. Landed in central TX.
W5HRH-15 (WSPR board on SBS-13 balloon) -  10 grams of free lift, anything over 8 grams has more risk. if it works it will work very well but increased risk of leaking as it achieves float altitude. It burst and came down in South Texas. I did have one work great with 11 grams of free lift but that's the upper limit. The most recent successes I have observed have had between 6.5 and 7.5 grams free lift.

Not Sure if still flying:
K7HAK-11 (APRS Skytracker with two silver foil balloons) - Likely landed in SC where there were a lot of storms. Didn't show up over Newfoundland per prediction but may still be aloft. If it doesn't show up in Europe within two days from now then it probably landed in SC.

GPSL balloons launched on Sunday:
Also W7EEU-11 launched an APRS Skytracker on a single silver foil balloon on Sunday since he couldn't launch on Saturday during our big event. It had a wild roller coaster ride after picking up some icing but finally reached a stable float on the second day. It was heading into northern Canada and may show up again in a few days in Europe if it is still flying.
K6STS launched a WSPR payload on an SBS-13 on Sunday as part of GPSL but it came down shortly about 2 miles from his house. He has recovered it and will fly again soon.

- Bill WB8ELK





KC7VQR11 being heard and decoded by a websdr in Greece and how to iGate it from Greece or a remote websdr

Bill Brown
 

I am listening to a websdr.org   remote SDR radio near northern Greece. I use Direwolf and VB-Audio to loop audio from the websdr radio to the Direwolf program to act as an i-Gate even though the balloon is over Bulgaria and I am in Alabama.  This works well when the balloon is over Siberia where there are no APRS digis or iGates but there are some webSDR receivers.

- Bill WB8ELK


Balloon Launch From Drone

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I posted my drone camera's view of my launch on YouTube. Here's the link, https://youtu.be/LGexvt6NPXM  

--
Dr. L. Paul Verhage
Near Space Evangelist


VA5BNC-15 - Looks like it's finally touched down in South Carolina

Bruce Coates
 

Hi

Doesn't look like VA5BNC-15 is going make another miraculous recovery today.  Not surprising as the surface winds at touch down were in the 30 km/h range.

Looks like the nearest APRS stations are 40-50 km away.

I've created an object called VA5BNC-LZ at Bill's predicted landing point.

73, Bruce - VE5BNC


Re: VA5BNC-15 has taken off again from GA

Jules Hojnowski
 

Hi :)

I used to work in the space sci dept at cornell and i still follow space info and i saw this and thought i would share :)

Is there anything that shows that these sun events affect anything with balloon trips?

Thanks :)
JulesImage




From: GPSL@groups.io <GPSL@groups.io> on behalf of Bill Brown via groups.io <wb8elk@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 14, 2020 11:30:15 PM
To: GPSL@groups.io <GPSL@groups.io>
Cc: bruce.coates@... <bruce.coates@...>
Subject: Re: [GPSL] VA5BNC-15 has taken off again from GA
 
More like in a swamp in SC :-)  My prediction shows it has likely landed about 2 km NW of the last APRS position at 33.3816 / -80.9417  in a clearing near Cooper Swamp just south of Orangeburg, SC.

If it lands in the clearing you have a chance of taking off again tomorrow morning.

I don't think there is a big leak...just normal every day loss which is possibly higher with the 2017 batch of balloons....either that or there was some leakage out of the balloon's filling port during high peak pressure. You now have a hot air solar balloon instead of a superpressure balloon.


- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: Bruce Coates <bruce.coates@...>
To: GPSL@groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 14, 2020 4:36 pm
Subject: Re: [GPSL] VA5BNC-15 has taken off again from GA

Quarantine will likely be 14 days at the top of a tree or Atlantic
ocean.  ;-)




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