Date   
Re: NASA Breaks a Balloon Altitude Record

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

Can you imagine paying that kind of money for a balloon launch? A flight into space on a Falcon 9 is about the same price.


On Thu, Sep 13, 2018, 12:37 PM Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:
Well, if you figure ~250 cu ft for a typical 1200g balloon, around 240,000.  That's a lot of ARHAB flights!

If they were paying commercial rates for their helium (which I think is approaching $1/cu ft again), that'd be $60M for their lifting gas for that mission.  Somehow I doubt they're paying that much.

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Thu, Sep 13, 2018 at 12:58 PM Bruce Coates <bruce.coates@...> wrote:
How many balloons could we fly with 60 million cubic feet of He?  ;-)

------ Original message------
From: L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
Date: Thu, Sep 13, 2018 7:06 AM
Cc:
Subject:[GPSL] NASA Breaks a Balloon Altitude Record

Re: NASA Breaks a Balloon Altitude Record

Hank Riley
 

The usage of helium for the typical amateur balloon refers to ground level conditions, similar to Standard Temperature and Pressure which is 20 Celsius and 1013 millibars pressure.

The 60 million cubic feet of the NASA "Big 60" balloon refers to the fully inflated envelope at its peak (equilibrium) altitude of 159,000 feet.  The pressure there is under a millibar, so the gas is expanded over a thousand times in volume over what it was on the surface.  The standard atmosphere specifies a mild temperature very near STP, but during the day there must be significant heating to the envelope.  I'll just deal with the pressure difference which dominates.

So whittle those 240,000 amateur balloons down to more like 240 as a result of dividing by 1000.  And now the low volume, retail customer cost estimate is $600,000 instead of $60 million.

Sanity/error check on the 240,000 balloon answer:  

             Mark was using as typical a 1200 gram balloon and 250 cubic feet.  For helium
             that's good for about 8 pounds of payload according to Liftwin.

             The NASA instrument payload was 200 kilograms = 441 pounds.

             8 x 240,000 = 1,920,000 pounds of payload lift = 960 tons lift!  Impossible.

The specific solution is as follows neglecting extra balloon gas heating beyond ambient and giving STP gas volume:

At 159,000 feet, it's .992 millibar and 271 Kelvin.  STP is 1013 millibars and 273 Kelvin.

60 * 10**6 * .992 / 1013 * 273 / 271 = .059 * 10**6 = 59,000 cubic feet  (for the on-the-ground volume of helium for the Big 60)

Hank
_______________________________________________________


Well, if you figure ~250 cu ft for a typical 1200g balloon, around 240,000.  That's a lot of ARHAB flights!

If they were paying commercial rates for their helium (which I think is approaching $1/cu ft again), that'd be $60M for their lifting gas for that mission.  Somehow I doubt they're paying that much.

Re: NASA Breaks a Balloon Altitude Record

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Hank, nice job on going the next step with the math which I didn't do.  

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Thu, Sep 13, 2018 at 10:51 PM Hank Riley via Groups.Io <n1ltv=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The usage of helium for the typical amateur balloon refers to ground level conditions, similar to Standard Temperature and Pressure which is 20 Celsius and 1013 millibars pressure.

The 60 million cubic feet of the NASA "Big 60" balloon refers to the fully inflated envelope at its peak (equilibrium) altitude of 159,000 feet.  The pressure there is under a millibar, so the gas is expanded over a thousand times in volume over what it was on the surface.  The standard atmosphere specifies a mild temperature very near STP, but during the day there must be significant heating to the envelope.  I'll just deal with the pressure difference which dominates.

So whittle those 240,000 amateur balloons down to more like 240 as a result of dividing by 1000.  And now the low volume, retail customer cost estimate is $600,000 instead of $60 million.

Sanity/error check on the 240,000 balloon answer:  

             Mark was using as typical a 1200 gram balloon and 250 cubic feet.  For helium
             that's good for about 8 pounds of payload according to Liftwin.

             The NASA instrument payload was 200 kilograms = 441 pounds.

             8 x 240,000 = 1,920,000 pounds of payload lift = 960 tons lift!  Impossible.

The specific solution is as follows neglecting extra balloon gas heating beyond ambient and giving STP gas volume:

At 159,000 feet, it's .992 millibar and 271 Kelvin.  STP is 1013 millibars and 273 Kelvin.

60 * 10**6 * .992 / 1013 * 273 / 271 = .059 * 10**6 = 59,000 cubic feet  (for the on-the-ground volume of helium for the Big 60)

Hank
_______________________________________________________


Well, if you figure ~250 cu ft for a typical 1200g balloon, around 240,000.  That's a lot of ARHAB flights!

If they were paying commercial rates for their helium (which I think is approaching $1/cu ft again), that'd be $60M for their lifting gas for that mission.  Somehow I doubt they're paying that much.

Re: NASA Breaks a Balloon Altitude Record

Joe WB9SBD
 

Don't forget the weight of that Giant Balloon!
My "LITTLE" 300,000 Cubic Footer

weighs 31 pounds

Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 9/13/2018 10:51 PM, Hank Riley via Groups.Io wrote:
The usage of helium for the typical amateur balloon refers to ground level conditions, similar to Standard Temperature and Pressure which is 20 Celsius and 1013 millibars pressure.

The 60 million cubic feet of the NASA "Big 60" balloon refers to the fully inflated envelope at its peak (equilibrium) altitude of 159,000 feet.  The pressure there is under a millibar, so the gas is expanded over a thousand times in volume over what it was on the surface.  The standard atmosphere specifies a mild temperature very near STP, but during the day there must be significant heating to the envelope.  I'll just deal with the pressure difference which dominates.

So whittle those 240,000 amateur balloons down to more like 240 as a result of dividing by 1000.  And now the low volume, retail customer cost estimate is $600,000 instead of $60 million.

Sanity/error check on the 240,000 balloon answer:  

             Mark was using as typical a 1200 gram balloon and 250 cubic feet.  For helium
             that's good for about 8 pounds of payload according to Liftwin.

             The NASA instrument payload was 200 kilograms = 441 pounds.

             8 x 240,000 = 1,920,000 pounds of payload lift = 960 tons lift!  Impossible.

The specific solution is as follows neglecting extra balloon gas heating beyond ambient and giving STP gas volume:

At 159,000 feet, it's .992 millibar and 271 Kelvin.  STP is 1013 millibars and 273 Kelvin.

60 * 10**6 * .992 / 1013 * 273 / 271 = .059 * 10**6 = 59,000 cubic feet  (for the on-the-ground volume of helium for the Big 60)

Hank
_______________________________________________________


Well, if you figure ~250 cu ft for a typical 1200g balloon, around 240,000.  That's a lot of ARHAB flights!

If they were paying commercial rates for their helium (which I think is approaching $1/cu ft again), that'd be $60M for their lifting gas for that mission.  Somehow I doubt they're paying that much.


Floater Balloon - VA5BNC-15

Bruce Coates
 

Hi

Sorry for the short notice but things have been a bit hectic.

On Sunday morning, September 30 I launched my first floater, VA5BNC-15 from Saskatoon, (52.1N, 106.6W).  It survived the first night and has made it all the way from Saskatoon to somewhere off the east coast of Newfoundland.  If I'm very lucky, will make it across the pond in the next 48 hours.  It should switch to 144.800 in the mid-atlantic, but if there are any European stations that can listen on 144.390, that would be appreciated.  During the day, it beacons once per minute at 13 seconds after the minute and at night, it's on a roughly 15 minute cycle.

https://aprs.fi/#!call=a%2FVA5BNC-15&timerange=86400&tail=86400

Please pass this on to anyone who many be interested.

73, Bruce - VE5BNC

2019 GPSL Save the Date!

Mike, n0mpm
 

GPSL will be in Pella, IA,, June 13, 14 and 15.  Genelle is planning to recreate our Wednesday evening picnic at our house for those that come in on Wednesday afternoon.   We are busy planning an interesting day of tours on the 13th.  
It’s not too soon to consider giving a presentation.
Watch for additional information after the New Year..
Mike. n0mpm
Pella Explores Near Space (PENS)

Re: 2019 GPSL Save the Date!

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Mike,

Looking forward to it!  We really enjoyed our time in Pella at your last GPSL.  

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Sat, Oct 6, 2018 at 10:48 AM Mike, n0mpm <morgamp52@...> wrote:
GPSL will be in Pella, IA,, June 13, 14 and 15.  Genelle is planning to recreate our Wednesday evening picnic at our house for those that come in on Wednesday afternoon.   We are busy planning an interesting day of tours on the 13th.  
It’s not too soon to consider giving a presentation.
Watch for additional information after the New Year..
Mike. n0mpm
Pella Explores Near Space (PENS)

Re: 2019 GPSL Save the Date!

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

Here here! It was a great event in 2013.


On Sat, Oct 6, 2018, 10:14 AM Mark Conner N9XTN <mconner1@...> wrote:
Mike,

Looking forward to it!  We really enjoyed our time in Pella at your last GPSL.  

73 de Mark N9XTN

On Sat, Oct 6, 2018 at 10:48 AM Mike, n0mpm <morgamp52@...> wrote:
GPSL will be in Pella, IA,, June 13, 14 and 15.  Genelle is planning to recreate our Wednesday evening picnic at our house for those that come in on Wednesday afternoon.   We are busy planning an interesting day of tours on the 13th.  
It’s not too soon to consider giving a presentation.
Watch for additional information after the New Year..
Mike. n0mpm
Pella Explores Near Space (PENS)

Stargazing Almanac

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I'm experimenting with a free monthly astronomy newsletter. If you're interested, you can subscribe at, https://stargazingalmanac.substack.com/

aprs.fi and Google Maps

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Crossposting this from the APRSSIG, since there are so many aprs.fi users here.

73 de Mark N9XTN

Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2018 09:32:36 +0300 (EEST)
From: Heikki Hannikainen <hessu@...>
To: aprssig@...
Subject: [aprssig] aprs.fi and Google Maps API pricing changes, status
        update
Message-ID: <alpine.DEB.2.20.1810160919570.6015@...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"; Format="flowed"


Hi,

Here's the current status of aprs.fi, Google Maps API pricing, and 
Leaflet/OSM mapping.

As most of you already know, Google bumped up the pricing of the Maps API 
significantly this summer, so that aprs.fi would have paid about 
4000-5000? (4500-5700 USD) per month to use the fine maps, and assorted 
services (superb address search, and a few other goodies). Understandably, 
that'd be more than I could pay, and a difficult amount to come up as 
donations or subscription fees, every month.

As a contingency plan I made a port of aprs.fi using Leaflet for mapping. 
Leaflet can load map tiles from tile servers (or services) which generate 
PNG map images from, for example, OSM data. A few individuals and 
companies reached out to me and offered to provide access to their tile 
servers for PNG OSM maps, either for free, or for a discount. This version 
is still running on https://beta.aprs.fi/.  It uses Geonames for address 
search, which is not that great. Google can actually do proper searching 
of street addresses in Finland (or Japan, in Japanese), for example, while 
Geonames will only find cities and towns. OSM maps are better than Google 
maps in some places in the world, and less good in others.

At the same time I exchanged several emails and some phone calls with 
Google's representatives in the sales support, and eventually in the Maps 
API team, and explained the situation. The advertisement income for a site 
like this is simply nowhere near the Maps API fees; it's on a different 
decade, and there are other costs to cover, too.

Google has some programs for nonprofits, crisis response organisations, 
news media and startups, but I'm not eligible for any of those options, as 
I'm not a registered nonprofit organisation or a growth-mode startup with 
venture capital; I'm a one-man-and-a-cat sized private limited company, 
which doesn't make practical profit from the web site though. It's just 
easier to do the finances and taxes this way, and it helps me do some odd 
consulting jobs sometimes. It's a hobby.

Crisis responder organisations (Red Cross, local ARES teams, etc) use 
aprs.fi from time to time in some form, but they're only eligible for free 
Maps API for up to two months at a time. 
(https://developers.google.com/maps/billing/understanding-public-programs)

In the end, the good folks at Google Maps figured they still would like to 
support aprs.fi. They configured additional monthly credits for my billing 
account, so that I won't be charged for the time being, and indicated that 
a more permanent process/solution would be figured out later.

As the combination of Google Maps, their reliable tile servers, address 
search and street view is pretty good, I plan to keep using it as the 
primary solution for the time being.

The Leaflet variant does work, and I plan to keep it available, perhaps at 
a more permanent address than the current 'beta'. It's also useful for 
running separate service instances for different purposes than APRS.

   - Hessu, OH7LZB, AF5QT  

Rasberry Pi and High Altitude Balloons

Jason Unwin
 

Our Civil Air Patrol Squadron got some Raspberry Pi kits for STEM activities. We might have a couple left over when we are done. I am wondering if there are any kits or additional "sensors" we can add to the basic Raspberry Pi for a HAB flight. Specifically something to help track the payloads and possibly a way to log air temperature, density, humidity, or maybe even cosmic radiation. Any thoughts and links to ideas is greatly appreciated.


Jason Unwin
KF5UEF

Re: Rasberry Pi and High Altitude Balloons

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

My last three articles in Nuts and Volts cover this topic. I have notes and code in each article.


On Mon, Oct 29, 2018, 4:31 PM Jason Unwin via Groups.Io <generalripper_1999=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Our Civil Air Patrol Squadron got some Raspberry Pi kits for STEM activities. We might have a couple left over when we are done. I am wondering if there are any kits or additional "sensors" we can add to the basic Raspberry Pi for a HAB flight. Specifically something to help track the payloads and possibly a way to log air temperature, density, humidity, or maybe even cosmic radiation. Any thoughts and links to ideas is greatly appreciated.


Jason Unwin
KF5UEF

The Stargazing Almanac

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

For anyone interested in my stargazing newsletter, I just posted December's. It's at, https://stargazingalmanac.substack.com/

Selection of Frequencies and repeaters.

Jason Unwin
 

I am going to start putting repeaters into my new Yaesu FT2D. I have a few questions:

1. How do you select the repeaters to use for your launches?

2. How do you decide on the frequencies to use for the launch?

 

 

Again, I'm trying to get something going here in Oklahoma. 

 

Jason Unwin

KF5UEF

Long duration high altitude balloons

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Texas Groups?

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I'm looking for someone near Houston that can launch a weather balloon for a student. Thanks

HAB video from Chile

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Updates to KML Log Konverter

Zack Clobes W0ZC
 

I'm not sure if anyone is using my KML Konverter tool, but I recently updated it to include telemetry data in the spreadsheet output file.  Any arbitrary data sets within the comments section of the APRS packet will be broken out and listed in the download.  See the announcement for more information.




Zack Clobes, W0ZC
Project: Traveler
www.projecttraveler.org

Join us on Facebook for the latest information:



Project: Traveler is a research project of Custom Digital Services, LLC.

Re: Updates to KML Log Konverter

Carlton Corbitt
 

Hi Zach,

Thanks for posting, i had been planning on using some time this winter to get together some videos on past flights.
I didn't konw of Konverter, but i'll give the tool a try,  it should help me speed up the process some.

Carlton
KI4NHK

Cold air

Joe WB9SBD
 

With the super cold temps we have had here the past two days It was 30 below this morning. 60+ below wind chill.

But anyway the 30 below got me to wonder what the temps aloft were like and was amazed, at the lower levels it actually gets warmer as you go up. Interesting!

Joe WB9SBD

--

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com
--

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com