Date   

Re: Whoa, GPSL for the next five years!!

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I also want to thank everyone who has helped to make this conference the success it has been.


On Sat, Jul 14, 2018, 11:42 AM L. Paul Verhage KD4STH <nearsys@...> wrote:
We have commitments for GPSL until 2023. Amazing how this is conference is still goong strong after 17 years. Here's the breakdown.

2019: PENS in Pella, IA
2020: NSTAR in Omaha, NE
2021: Bill Brown in Space Port, IN
2022: Bill Brown in Huntsville, AL
2023: EOSS in Colorado

Thanks everyone, I am planning to attend each one.


Whoa, GPSL for the next five years!!

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

We have commitments for GPSL until 2023. Amazing how this is conference is still goong strong after 17 years. Here's the breakdown.

2019: PENS in Pella, IA
2020: NSTAR in Omaha, NE
2021: Bill Brown in Space Port, IN
2022: Bill Brown in Huntsville, AL
2023: EOSS in Colorado

Thanks everyone, I am planning to attend each one.


Re: Cheap tracker for possible one-way mission

Mark Garrett
 

I know this is a tad late but maybe you might have something in your collective junk boxes.  
When I first read this it might be suitable for a small signal source oscillator keyed or switched on and off that it is obvious to the tracker and using standard tracking equipment.  I recently flew a clock oscillator as a backup to APRS transmitters on a balloon.  Had no problem hearing it all the way up and down on both the two meter harmonic and the fundamental 28.322 MHZ.  I know that several of these trackers have flown on balloons in the past with pretty decent results for what they were for keeping things light and long term operation. 

So, what do you have?

Mark
KA9SZX

On Thursday, July 5, 2018, 7:10:50 PM CDT, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH <nearsys@gmail.com> wrote:





To add to Mark's request...

If you find yourself in the Valentine area of Nebraska around August 9th, we could always use your help chasing after two balloons.

Thanks

On Thu, Jul 5, 2018, 6:03 PM Bruce Coates <bruce.coates@sasktel.net> wrote:
  
  Hi Mark

It's probably not feasible given the time frame but I'm working on an Arduino (Trackuino) based tracker for a floater.  It's definitely a DIY project as it's assembled from individual parts.  The assembled weight should be around 35-40 grams and will run for about 5 hours with a 1 minute beacon rate on a 150mah lipo and up to 2 days if the beacon rate is reduced.  I can post the details and code if anyone is interested.

The parts required are:
Arduino 3.3v 8Mhz
NEO6M GPS module
SR-FRS-1W radio by Sunrise Electronics
DS1820 temperature sensor(s) (Optional)
Solar cells and charge controller (Optional)
3 resistors, 3 capacitors (Some are optional)
150 mAh (or larger) Lipo pack

73, Bruce - VE5BNC


On 2018-07-05 2:59 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN wrote:


  
  
Paul KD4STH and I are looking at doing a launch from the Nebraska Star Party on August 7 from south of Valentine, NE.  The region is fairly devoid of roads, and much more populated with cattle and rough terrain than people.  We are considering a recovery-optional mission for this flight - if it's too difficult to retrieve, we'll skip it.




I have not kept track of the lightweight and low-cost trackers that are out there, and some are probably still in beta.  Ideally I'd like something under $100 to keep our expense down should we choose not to recover it.  Any ideas?  Some of the lower-cost devices seem to have gone out of production.




Obviously it needs a GPS with ~120 kft altitude capability, but can be relatively low-power.  It can also be on 144.39 since the ground APRS infrastructure is nil, so no competition with other stations.  1 or 2 lithium AA batteries for power would be ok as it only has to last a few hours.  Telemetry is not a big deal for this flight either.  Pre-configuration is OK too, I don't think we'll need to fiddle with the setup.  We may have to work out timeslotting with the other flight if necessary, but I think we can do that in advance too.




Feel free to contact me off-list if you'd rather.




73 de Mark N9XTN






Re: What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Bruce Coates
 

Hi Kip

Yup.  The idea of it providing a method for coupling to a ground plane certainly seems to be the most plausible purpose.

73, Bruce

------ Original message------
From: AE5IB (Kip)
Date: Fri, Jul 13, 2018 7:56 AM
To: GPSL;
Cc:
Subject:Re: [GPSL] What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

I can not put my hands on it right now, but a GPS antenna specification i read last year, recommended the antenna be mounted on a minimum of  40mm x 40mm ground plane to get maximum GPS sensitivity! . 

My guess is that they are facilitating that requirement, to make the antenna system easier to ground to a metal plate. 

Kip

On Thu, Jul 12, 2018 at 10:45 PM Bruce Coates <bruce.coates@...> wrote:
Right. Missed that part. Yes, the entire "back" side of the mesh is covered with adhesive. I think that's what holds it to the shield as there no evidence of any soldering or other electrical connection. 

-------- Original message --------
From: "Hank Riley via Groups.Io" yahoo.com@groups.io>
Date: 7/12/18 8:21 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: GPSL@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GPSL] W! hat's this on the GPS antenna lead?

The decoupling idea did occur to me, but I did kind of slide over your wording concerning the coax shield.

A few more clue requests:

By "connected," do you really mean connected galvanically to the shield?   Or just folded around the coax tightly?  Can't tell by the photo for sure.  One picture I found looks as if there might be a sliver of shield exposed on the end of the mesh closest to the antenna.  If connected, please describe how that's done (one or two places; by solder?). 

Does the adhesive cover the central area of the mesh at all?

My thought was attaching the mesh to the coax was simply for product packaging purposes and was intended to be only temporary until applied to the antenna. 

Maybe the mesh does both functions.  I don't think the entire mesh area is needed for decoupling.

__________________________________________________________

Hi Hank

Interesting. I was also wondering about it being some attempt at common mode decoupling, like a 1/4 wave stub.

73, Bruce


Re: What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

AE5IB (Kip)
 

I can not put my hands on it right now, but a GPS antenna specification i read last year, recommended the antenna be mounted on a minimum of  40mm x 40mm ground plane to get maximum GPS sensitivity. 

My guess is that they are facilitating that requirement, to make the antenna system easier to ground to a metal plate. 

Kip


On Thu, Jul 12, 2018 at 10:45 PM Bruce Coates <bruce.coates@...> wrote:
Right. Missed that part. Yes, the entire "back" side of the mesh is covered with adhesive. I think that's what holds it to the shield as there no evidence of any soldering or other electrical connection. 

-------- Original message --------
From: "Hank Riley via Groups.Io" <n1ltv=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Date: 7/12/18 8:21 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: GPSL@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GPSL] What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

The decoupling idea did occur to me, but I did kind of slide over your wording concerning the coax shield.

A few more clue requests:

By "connected," do you really mean connected galvanically to the shield?   Or just folded around the coax tightly?  Can't tell by the photo for sure.  One picture I found looks as if there might be a sliver of shield exposed on the end of the mesh closest to the antenna.  If connected, please describe how that's done (one or two places; by solder?). 

Does the adhesive cover the central area of the mesh at all?

My thought was attaching the mesh to the coax was simply for product packaging purposes and was intended to be only temporary until applied to the antenna. 

Maybe the mesh does both functions.  I don't think the entire mesh area is needed for decoupling.

__________________________________________________________

Hi Hank

Interesting. I was also wondering about it being some attempt at common mode decoupling, like a 1/4 wave stub.

73, Bruce


Re: What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Bruce Coates
 

Right. Missed that part. Yes, the entire "back" side of the mesh is covered with adhesive. I think that's what holds it to the shield as there no evidence of any soldering or other electrical connection. 


-------- Original message --------
From: "Hank Riley via Groups.Io" <n1ltv@...>
Date: 7/12/18 8:21 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: GPSL@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GPSL] What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

The decoupling idea did occur to me, but I did kind of slide over your wording concerning the coax shield.

A few more clue requests:

By "connected," do you really mean connected galvanically to the shield?   Or just folded around the coax tightly?  Can't tell by the photo for sure.  One picture I found looks as if there might be a sliver of shield exposed on the end of the mesh closest to the antenna.  If connected, please describe how that's done (one or two places; by solder?). 

Does the adhesive cover the central area of the mesh at all?

My thought was attaching the mesh to the coax was simply for product packaging purposes and was intended to be only temporary until applied to the antenna. 

Maybe the mesh does both functions.  I don't think the entire mesh area is needed for decoupling.

__________________________________________________________

Hi Hank

Interesting. I was also wondering about it being some attempt at common mode decoupling, like a 1/4 wave stub.

73, Bruce


Re: What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Bruce Coates
 

Yes, it's definitely electrically connected to the coax braid.  They're stripped the outer insulation for the entire width of the mesh and wrapped the mesh tab around it.  Oddly, either the adhesive is conductive or there's enough metal fibres that pass through the adhesive to conduct.

Here's a shot under a microscope.  (I love my microscope!)

73, Bruce

On 2018-07-12 8:21 PM, Hank Riley via Groups.Io wrote:
The decoupling idea did occur to me, but I did kind of slide over your wording concerning the coax shield.

A few more clue requests:

By "connected," do you really mean connected galvanically to the shield?   Or just folded around the coax tightly?  Can't tell by the photo for sure.  One picture I found looks as if there might be a sliver of shield exposed on the end of the mesh closest to the antenna.  If connected, please describe how that's done (one or two places; by solder?). 

Does the adhesive cover the central area of the mesh at all?

My thought was attaching the mesh to the coax was simply for product packaging purposes and was intended to be only temporary until applied to the antenna. 

Maybe the mesh does both functions.  I don't think the entire mesh area is needed for decoupling.

__________________________________________________________

Hi Hank

Interesting. I was also wondering about it being some attempt at common mode decoupling, like a 1/4 wave stub.

73, Bruce



Re: What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Hank Riley
 

The decoupling idea did occur to me, but I did kind of slide over your wording concerning the coax shield.

A few more clue requests:

By "connected," do you really mean connected galvanically to the shield?   Or just folded around the coax tightly?  Can't tell by the photo for sure.  One picture I found looks as if there might be a sliver of shield exposed on the end of the mesh closest to the antenna.  If connected, please describe how that's done (one or two places; by solder?). 

Does the adhesive cover the central area of the mesh at all?

My thought was attaching the mesh to the coax was simply for product packaging purposes and was intended to be only temporary until applied to the antenna. 

Maybe the mesh does both functions.  I don't think the entire mesh area is needed for decoupling.

__________________________________________________________

Hi Hank

Interesting. I was also wondering about it being some attempt at common mode decoupling, like a 1/4 wave stub.

73, Bruce


Re: What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Bruce Coates
 

Hi Hank

Interesting. I was also wondering about it being some attempt at common mode decoupling, like a 1/4 wave stub.

73, Bruce


-------- Original message --------
From: "Hank Riley via Groups.Io" <n1ltv@...>
Date: 7/12/18 6:29 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: GPSL@groups.io
Subject: Re: [GPSL] What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Bruce,

I'm pretty sure that's a ground plane intended to be affixed to the underside of the supplied antenna to improve its performance.  One of the clues is the presence of the adhesive; another is the size of the mesh.  A nice touch for that to be included in the package.

Hope this solves the "Mystery of the Thing."

Hank
___________________________________

My module has an adhesive "thing" on the feedline about half way down. This "thing" is fine metal mesh and is connected to the shield of the feedline.  It seems to be common on the tiny ceramic antennas on eBay but many also don't have it. 


Re: What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Hank Riley
 

Bruce,

I'm pretty sure that's a ground plane intended to be affixed to the underside of the supplied antenna to improve its performance.  One of the clues is the presence of the adhesive; another is the size of the mesh.  A nice touch for that to be included in the package.

Hope this solves the "Mystery of the Thing."

Hank
___________________________________

My module has an adhesive "thing" on the feedline about half way down. This "thing" is fine metal mesh and is connected to the shield of the feedline.  It seems to be common on the tiny ceramic antennas on eBay but many also don't have it. 


What's this on the GPS antenna lead?

Bruce Coates
 

Hi

I'm building a tracker using a Ublox Neo 6m module from eBay (of course).  My module has an adhesive "thing" on the feedline about half way down. This "thing" is fine metal mesh and is connected to the shield of the feedline.  It seems to be common on the tiny ceramic antennas on eBay but many also don't have it. 

Any ideas?

Thanks

Bruce - VE5BNC


Re: Cheap tracker for possible one-way mission

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

To add to Mark's request...

If you find yourself in the Valentine area of Nebraska around August 9th, we could always use your help chasing after two balloons.

Thanks

On Thu, Jul 5, 2018, 6:03 PM Bruce Coates <bruce.coates@...> wrote:
Hi Mark

It's probably not feasible given the time frame but I'm working on an Arduino (Trackuino) based tracker for a floater.  It's definitely a DIY project as it's assembled from individual parts.  The assembled weight should be around 35-40 grams and will run for about 5 hours with a 1 minute beacon rate on a 150mah lipo and up to 2 days if the beacon rate is reduced.  I can post the details and code if anyone is interested.

The parts required are:
Arduino 3.3v 8Mhz
NEO6M GPS module
SR-FRS-1W radio by Sunrise Electronics
DS1820 temperature sensor(s) (Optional)
Solar cells and charge controller (Optional)
3 resistors, 3 capacitors (Some are optional)
150 mAh (or larger) Lipo pack

73, Bruce - VE5BNC

On 2018-07-05 2:59 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN wrote:
Paul KD4STH and I are looking at doing a launch from the Nebraska Star Party on August 7 from south of Valentine, NE.  The region is fairly devoid of roads, and much more populated with cattle and rough terrain than people.  We are considering a recovery-optional mission for this flight - if it's too difficult to retrieve, we'll skip it.

I have not kept track of the lightweight and low-cost trackers that are out there, and some are probably still in beta.  Ideally I'd like something under $100 to keep our expense down should we choose not to recover it.  Any ideas?  Some of the lower-cost devices seem to have gone out of production.

Obviously it needs a GPS with ~120 kft altitude capability, but can be relatively low-power.  It can also be on 144.39 since the ground APRS infrastructure is nil, so no competition with other stations.  1 or 2 lithium AA batteries for power would be ok as it only has to last a few hours.  Telemetry is not a big deal for this flight either.  Pre-configuration is OK too, I don't think we'll need to fiddle with the setup.  We may have to work out timeslotting with the other flight if necessary, but I think we can do that in advance too.

Feel free to contact me off-list if you'd rather.

73 de Mark N9XTN



Re: Cheap tracker for possible one-way mission

Bruce Coates
 

Hi Mark

It's probably not feasible given the time frame but I'm working on an Arduino (Trackuino) based tracker for a floater.  It's definitely a DIY project as it's assembled from individual parts.  The assembled weight should be around 35-40 grams and will run for about 5 hours with a 1 minute beacon rate on a 150mah lipo and up to 2 days if the beacon rate is reduced.  I can post the details and code if anyone is interested.

The parts required are:
Arduino 3.3v 8Mhz
NEO6M GPS module
SR-FRS-1W radio by Sunrise Electronics
DS1820 temperature sensor(s) (Optional)
Solar cells and charge controller (Optional)
3 resistors, 3 capacitors (Some are optional)
150 mAh (or larger) Lipo pack

73, Bruce - VE5BNC

On 2018-07-05 2:59 PM, Mark Conner N9XTN wrote:
Paul KD4STH and I are looking at doing a launch from the Nebraska Star Party on August 7 from south of Valentine, NE.  The region is fairly devoid of roads, and much more populated with cattle and rough terrain than people.  We are considering a recovery-optional mission for this flight - if it's too difficult to retrieve, we'll skip it.

I have not kept track of the lightweight and low-cost trackers that are out there, and some are probably still in beta.  Ideally I'd like something under $100 to keep our expense down should we choose not to recover it.  Any ideas?  Some of the lower-cost devices seem to have gone out of production.

Obviously it needs a GPS with ~120 kft altitude capability, but can be relatively low-power.  It can also be on 144.39 since the ground APRS infrastructure is nil, so no competition with other stations.  1 or 2 lithium AA batteries for power would be ok as it only has to last a few hours.  Telemetry is not a big deal for this flight either.  Pre-configuration is OK too, I don't think we'll need to fiddle with the setup.  We may have to work out timeslotting with the other flight if necessary, but I think we can do that in advance too.

Feel free to contact me off-list if you'd rather.

73 de Mark N9XTN



Cheap tracker for possible one-way mission

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Paul KD4STH and I are looking at doing a launch from the Nebraska Star Party on August 7 from south of Valentine, NE.  The region is fairly devoid of roads, and much more populated with cattle and rough terrain than people.  We are considering a recovery-optional mission for this flight - if it's too difficult to retrieve, we'll skip it.

I have not kept track of the lightweight and low-cost trackers that are out there, and some are probably still in beta.  Ideally I'd like something under $100 to keep our expense down should we choose not to recover it.  Any ideas?  Some of the lower-cost devices seem to have gone out of production.

Obviously it needs a GPS with ~120 kft altitude capability, but can be relatively low-power.  It can also be on 144.39 since the ground APRS infrastructure is nil, so no competition with other stations.  1 or 2 lithium AA batteries for power would be ok as it only has to last a few hours.  Telemetry is not a big deal for this flight either.  Pre-configuration is OK too, I don't think we'll need to fiddle with the setup.  We may have to work out timeslotting with the other flight if necessary, but I think we can do that in advance too.

Feel free to contact me off-list if you'd rather.

73 de Mark N9XTN


Re: Foreground promo objects in view of the camera

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

My items are mounted two feet from the camera on an acrylic plastic platform. Two carbon fiber rods hold the platform in place. The carbon rods are bolted to the bottom of the airframe using plastic wire clamps.

I haven't seen any problems or out of focus problems. 

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 6:54 PM Zack Clobes W0ZC <zclobes@...> wrote:
For those of you who have flown promotional items in the foreground of your cameras, do you have any tips or suggestions?  I have a cut-out cardboard figure to fly into space, and am just wondering what issues might arise from the camera, how far out people are mounting their promotionals, and what mechanisms people are using to hold them?

My camera is a Canon A570IS with the CHDK, taking stills.


Again, my flyboy is going to be a cardboard cut out roughly 6cm tall, although I could scale him down.

image.png



Zack Clobes, W0ZC
Project: Traveler
www.projecttraveler.org

Join us on Facebook for the latest information:



Project: Traveler is a research project of Custom Digital Services, LLC.



Foreground promo objects in view of the camera

Zack Clobes W0ZC
 

For those of you who have flown promotional items in the foreground of your cameras, do you have any tips or suggestions?  I have a cut-out cardboard figure to fly into space, and am just wondering what issues might arise from the camera, how far out people are mounting their promotionals, and what mechanisms people are using to hold them?

My camera is a Canon A570IS with the CHDK, taking stills.


Again, my flyboy is going to be a cardboard cut out roughly 6cm tall, although I could scale him down.

image.png



Zack Clobes, W0ZC
Project: Traveler
www.projecttraveler.org

Join us on Facebook for the latest information:



Project: Traveler is a research project of Custom Digital Services, LLC.



Re: July 1 flight video and still images

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

It will be Sunday the 2nd. I will contact Strato Fox for help.


On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 2:36 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
Yes let us know when you’ll be down here Paul.  We are happy to help with your flight.

On Jul 2, 2018, at 2:02 PM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH <nearsys@...> wrote:

That's quite good. Congrats. I am planning to launch from near the bay area over Labor Day weekend.

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 1:33 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
This was the payload that stayed on the ground at GPSL 2018.  It was very hazy in CA yesterday due to the fires, so the images are not that great.  We did attain our highest burst so far, 110,194 feet.

Thanks to Hank Riley and everyone else on this list who gave me input on flight line. 


Video link:




Stills link:






Re: July 1 flight video and still images

John Kovac KM6GKF
 

Yes let us know when you’ll be down here Paul.  We are happy to help with your flight.

On Jul 2, 2018, at 2:02 PM, L. Paul Verhage KD4STH <nearsys@...> wrote:

That's quite good. Congrats. I am planning to launch from near the bay area over Labor Day weekend.

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 1:33 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
This was the payload that stayed on the ground at GPSL 2018.  It was very hazy in CA yesterday due to the fires, so the images are not that great.  We did attain our highest burst so far, 110,194 feet.

Thanks to Hank Riley and everyone else on this list who gave me input on flight line. 


Video link:




Stills link:






Re: July 1 flight video and still images

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

That's quite good. Congrats. I am planning to launch from near the bay area over Labor Day weekend.


On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 1:33 PM John Kovac KM6GKF <jkovac@...> wrote:
This was the payload that stayed on the ground at GPSL 2018.  It was very hazy in CA yesterday due to the fires, so the images are not that great.  We did attain our highest burst so far, 110,194 feet.

Thanks to Hank Riley and everyone else on this list who gave me input on flight line. 


Video link:




Stills link:






July 1 flight video and still images

John Kovac KM6GKF
 

This was the payload that stayed on the ground at GPSL 2018.  It was very hazy in CA yesterday due to the fires, so the images are not that great.  We did attain our highest burst so far, 110,194 feet.

Thanks to Hank Riley and everyone else on this list who gave me input on flight line. 


Video link:




Stills link:





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