Date   

ATC Monitoring Eclipse Balloon Launch

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Pilots flying on the days leading up to the coming solar eclipse on Aug. 21 have surely planned already to cope with extra traffic near the path of totality, but they also need to be aware of a nationwide balloon launch that will take place along that path. Teams of students will release about 100 high-altitude scientific balloons from about 30 locations along the eclipse path, from Oregon to South Carolina. The balloons will carry instruments to about 100,000 feet, where they will send back live images of the eclipse from the edge of space. Such images have been captured only once before, during a 2012 eclipse in Australia, and this will be the first time the images will stream live over the internet.

Each balloon is filled with helium, and together with its payload, weighs about 12 pounds. After about three hours of flight, each balloon will separate from its payload, which then will descend back to earth under a parachute. NBAA noted that pilots should be aware of the ballooning activities. “While FAA air traffic control centers regularly see high-altitude weather balloons in their airspace, this project is different because dozens of balloons will take flight in a short period of time,” said Heidi Williams, NBAA’s director of air traffic services. Each balloon will carry a satellite modem for tracking the balloon’s location, FAA spokesperson Elizabeth Isham Cory told AVweb on Thursday.

“Air traffic controllers will integrate a large number of simultaneously launched unmanned balloons with regular aircraft traffic,” Cory said. Besides the tracking device, each balloon will carry two cameras to transmit photos and high-definition video to a ground station plus a payload for a science project. “We are expecting air traffic will be up in the path of totality, and many airports in that path are also hosting events on Aug. 21, which will further increase air traffic,” added NBAA’s Williams. “We encourage operators to check with their destination FBOs to ensure needed ground support services will be available if operating in or near the path of totality.”


21st August Wyoming launch

Richard Babington
 

Good morning,


I am coming over to Wyoming from the UK and launching a high altitude ballloon from the Southern Wyoming area on the morning of the 21st August. I've done a number of these in the UK before - see 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/91049302@N00/albums/72157632733154985


for an example. In the UK high altitude society (UKHAS) we have a dispersed network of listeners listening on DL-FLDigi and while I am aware that there are quite a few listeners in the US, I do not know any of them outside of a guy in california!.  I will betransmitting on:


434.647MHz USB RTTY 50 baud 240Hz shift ASCII-7 no parity 2 stop bits


If you download DL-FLDigi HAB edition any correctly received packets will automatically upload onto spacenear.us


Current estimate of launch time is 1000 UTC, 1600 MDT.


Any listeners in the:

- Wyoming
- North East Utah
- North Colorado
- Western South Dakota
- Westen Nebraska

region would be greatly appreciated. Listeners in the Eastern Idaho and Southern Montana areas might be able to pick it up once (if) it gets above the Rockies, but coverage there might be inevitably limited.


Best regards



Richard Babington








Re: List of active balloon flights?

Curtis Wagner
 

On Tue, Aug 15, 2017 at 10:26 AM, 'Alan Adamson' akadamson@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:
 

Tracker.habhub.org

 

Alan

 

From: GPSL@... [mailto:GPSL@...] On Behalf Of Greg Clark greg@... [GPSL]
Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2017 10:17 AM
To: GPSL@...
Subject: [GPSL] List of active balloon flights?

 

 

I seem to remember there was a way to see a list of active balloon flights that were being tracked via APRS -- anyone have a link?

 

Greg K7RKT



Re: List of active balloon flights?

Alan Adamson
 

Tracker.habhub.org

 

Alan

 

From: GPSL@... [mailto:GPSL@...] On Behalf Of Greg Clark greg@... [GPSL]
Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2017 10:17 AM
To: GPSL@...
Subject: [GPSL] List of active balloon flights?

 

 

I seem to remember there was a way to see a list of active balloon flights that were being tracked via APRS -- anyone have a link?

 

Greg K7RKT


List of active balloon flights?

greg@bigredbee.com
 

I seem to remember there was a way to see a list of active balloon flights that were being tracked via APRS -- anyone have a link?

Greg K7RKT


Data Logging From Home?

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

Is anyone planning to remain at home during the eclipse and have around 50% of totality? 

The reason I ask, I would like to record temperature, relative humidity, and light intensity during the eclipse. But I would like these recorded somewhere where the eclipse is only partial. So if someone is planning to stay at home and not travel to see totality, could they contact me about placing my for data loggers outside their house and in the sun during the eclipse? 

All you would need to do is place a 9 volt battery on each datalogger. They will record data by themselves. Then after 4 hours just disconnect the battery and send the four dataloggers back to me.

Thanks


[UKHAS] Stabilotron-II eclipse flight and Wyoming and surrounding area listeners

Anthony Stirk
 


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Richard Babington <richard.babington@...>
Date: Fri, Aug 11, 2017 at 3:16 PM
Subject: [UKHAS] Stabilotron-II eclipse flight and Wyoming and surrounding area listeners
To: UKHAS <ukhas@...>


Good afternoon everyone,

It looks as if my eclipse balloon launch will (theoretically anyway) go up from the vicinity of Lander, Wyoming on the 21st August travelling East. Launching 1600 UTC, 1700 BST, 1000 MDT local time, back down 2.5-3.0 hours later. Transmitting details in the calendar.

Given the likely poor cellphone coverage in the area and difficulty uploading to spacenear, any listeners in the:

- Wyoming
- North East Utah
- North Colorado
- Western South Dakota
- Westen Nebraska

region would be greatly appreciated. Listeners in the Eastern Idaho and Southern Montana areas might be able to pick it up once (if) it gets above the Rockies, but coverage there might be inevitably limited.

Best regards


Richard
0044 7909 994 665

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Flying a LED?

Larry
 

For those of you who have flown an LED, LED's have a field of view and you can't get it too look at the sun all the time.  Do you see the turning of the payload in the LED signal?    Is it easy to separate out the portion of the signal change caused from the turning of the payload from the change in altitude?

Larry
KJ6PBS


Safe eclipse viewing - important updated guidance on safety-certified viewers and the flood of Chinese copies

Hank Riley
 


Vastly shortened text included below.  I'd urge all people who intend to view the eclipse
to read the whole article from the American Astronomical Society at the link immediately
below.

The AAS site is also an excellent resource for all kinds of authoritative eclipse
information including indirect methods of viewing the eclipse with and without the use
of a telescope.





How to Tell If Your Eclipse Glasses or Handheld Solar Viewers Are Safe

Eclipse Glasses and Viewers

Short Answer

We used to say that you should look for evidence that they comply with the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard for filters for direct viewing of the Sun. But now the marketplace is being flooded by counterfeit eclipse glasses that are labeled as if they're ISO-compliant when in fact they are not. So now we suggest that you make sure you get (or got) your eclipse viewers from one of the suppliers listed on our Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers page.

What to Avoid

Ordinary sunglasses (or multiple pairs of sunglasses), neutral density or polarizing filters (such as those made for camera lenses), smoked glass, photographic or X-ray film (unexposed, exposed, or developed), "space blankets," potato-chip bags, DVDs, and any other materials you may have heard about for solar viewing are not safe. In some cases these homemade filters may seem like they dim the Sun to a comfortable level, but that doesn't mean they do so across the whole electromagnetic spectrum. While you're enjoying a "comfortable" view of the "dim" Sun, solar infrared radiation could be cooking your retinas. And you wouldn't know till later, because your retinas don't have pain receptors. Only after the eclipse, when you notice blind spots or other vision problems, would you realize you'd made a catastrophic mistake.

What about welding filters? The only ones that are safe for direct viewing of the Sun with your eyes are those of Shade 12 or higher. These are much darker than the filters used for most kinds of welding. If you have an old welder's helmet around the house and are thinking of using it to view the Sun, make sure you know the filter's shade number. If it's less than 12 (and it probably is), don't even think about using it to look at the Sun. Many people find the Sun too bright even in a Shade 12 filter, and some find the Sun too dim in a Shade 14 filter — but Shade 13 filters are uncommon and can be hard to find. Our Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers page doesn't list any suppliers of welder's filters, only suppliers of special-purpose filters made for viewing the Sun.


EOSS Launches ADS-B Kickstarter Campaign

Marty Griffin
 

Hello EOSS Friends,

 

Today Edge of Space Sciences (EOSS) has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to implement Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) for high altitude balloon flights.  See it here:

 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1206401145/expanding-near-space-balloon-research-implementing

 

 

EOSS and University of Colorado students plan to launch two high-altitude balloons with high-definition cameras and scientific equipment to directly coincide with the Total Solar Eclipse that will occur on Monday, August 21, 2017. These research flights will be launched from Guernsey, Wyoming - directly under the eclipse path to assure flight in the area of eclipse totality.

This project will fund implementation of new FAA aircraft location technology (ADS-B) which will allow additional payload space on each balloon flight. This expanded capability, to be shared with all balloon groups, will enable more university and STEM students to send more research experiments to near space.

Goal #1: Successful Eclipse Balloon Mission

Our first goal during these balloon flights is to collect and stream live images, video and data to study this extremely rare event. These flights are in coordination with NASA's Space Grant Ballooning Project on behalf of the Colorado Space Grant Consortium.  This is an opportunity to educate our schools and community about the natural world of science.  This part of the project will be funded entirely by NASA.  These successful flights will enable us to pursue Goal # 2.

Goal #2:  Expand student participation by implementing new FAA location technology

Based on the success of Goal #1, our second goal is our Kickstarter project goal.  That is to raise funds to support expanded high altitude balloon student research.  Expansion will be enabled by implementing new FAA-certified flight location technology called Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) on our high altitude balloons where previously it has been focused only on aircraft. 

This project will integrate commercially available products only and package a solution to accommodate the rigors of near space flight. 

The FAA currently restricts balloon payload weights, and restricts our ability to fly through clouds which severely limits the number of students that can participate in a flight.  We believe balloon-based ADS-B location technology will allow all balloon groups to serve more students throughout the nation.

The Kickstarter page can be found here:

Pledge what you feel is appropriate so we can reach our $14,000 funding goal.  Kickstarter is an “all-or-nothing campaign”.  No proceeds are collected or distributed until the goal is reached or exceeded.  We have 30 days, so now is the time to make your pledges and reap the rewards defined on the Rewards section of the Web page.

Spread the Word!

This works only if we spread the word.  Please advise you Facebook friends, tweet your friends and associates, add this post prominently to your Web sites at home and at work.  Also, if you have media contacts, please contact them and feel free contact me for any questions and issues.  Please share this project with others who may have an interest in advancing this technology and serving even more students.

Contact me for any questions or for additional information.

Marty Griffin, WAØGEH, Edge of Space Sciences

WAØGEH@...

303-378-3900

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Mike and My's Flight [2 Attachments]

Jerry
 

Paul,

I don't know if you are still doing your forensic analysis of this flight but I put a tool online that might help create a new look at this.  It allows you to model a flight path in 3 dimensions as well as time (Maybe I should have called it TARDIS).  I created it to examine the accuracy of my in-flight prediction work.  It isn't completely accurate but it is a first pass.

Basically the program allows you to load a flight and it extracts the wind data from it.  Then you can load a file that contains your known points and puts them on the map and graph as circles.  You then try to adjust burst, ascent & descent to fit the track to the known points.  It's not perfect, It cannot hit all the circles when the wind data is from the same file (test file is from KD4STH-13).

Anyway, you can find it here: http://s3research.com/tools/pathrecreator/.

You can get the GPSL2017 flights and a test Known Points file here: GPSL2017 CSV files.  You will have to download them to use them.

One last note, This seems to run a lot faster in Google Chrome.

I will continue to improve the tool as I improve my prediction algorithm.  Let me know if it helps



 
Jerry Gable
Balloon Flight Prediction tools
http://www.s3research.com



From: "'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL]"
To: "GPSL@..."
Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2017 4:49 PM
Subject: [GPSL] Mike and My's Flight [2 Attachments]

 
[Attachment(s) from L. Paul Verhage included below]
I'm trying to figure out what altitude Mike and my's flight reached. I've attached a spreadsheet of calculations based on the limited data we have and I attached a screen print of the a packet received during descent from APRS.fi.

The ascent rate for the first 16,000 feet is known from the APRS data. It's either 1,215 fpm if the first ascent record is an outlier or its 1,181 if the first ascent calculation isn't an outlier. I made an assumption the balloon would slow down by 25% at either 40,000 or 50,000 feet. 

The time of flight is estimated to 142 minutes, based on the number of pictures taken during the flight. We need to double check that calculation, because we know the balloon was at 16,639 feet on descent (and two miles away from landing).

At a 142 minute flight, the balloon reached between 135,000 and 1421,000 feet. At a 71 minute flight, the balloon reached between 73,000 and 77,000 feet.

The balloon was a Kaymont 3,000 g balloon and the payload weight was around 8 pounds. So the 140,000 foot flight sounds too high and the 71,000 foot flight sounds too low. Since it's a Kaymont balloon, I don't expect it to fail very early. But the descent packet at 16,639 feet makes sense and gives the balloon 50 minutes to descend 59,000 feet. However, the parachute is 5 feet across and porous (it's made from an old hot air balloon and nearly 20 years old with a lot of experience under its canopy). So it could have descended faster than 1,000 fpm.

Do we have wind data from that day and can we run a calculation on the flight assuming 1,200 fpm ascent, 76,000 foot burst, and 1,000 fpm descent and see if the balloon ends up close to its real landing site? As I recall, the higher the balloon ascended at GPSL, the farther west it landed. And this balloon landed farther southwest of any of my balloons that day (one of them reached into the 90,000 foot range).

Thanks       
 

--
Dr. L. Paul Verhage
Near Space Evangelist



Re: BASE 101

Marty Griffin
 

Good luck Howard and congratulations on your 100th flight milestone.

Marty, EOSS

From: GPSL@... [mailto:GPSL@...] On Behalf Of BASE basedepauw@... [GPSL]
Sent: Monday, July 31, 2017 1:46 PM
To: GPSL List ; Harry Brooks
Subject: [GPSL] BASE 101

 




Friends,

 

BASE 101 will be flying tomorrow.  We will be using a tandem 600 gram balloon launch with a cut-away of one balloon at 120 mbar (about 50 kft).  This system should have a very rapid climb at launch, about 1300 ft/min, with a marked decrease to about 500 ft/min after cutaway. 

 

In addition to the normal APRS beacon, W9YJ-11 on 144.39, there will be a DF beacon on 433.92 MHz.

 

Thanks for your support,

Howard KC9QBN

BASE DePauw





BASE 101

BASE
 

Friends,

BASE 101 will be flying tomorrow.  We will be using a tandem 600 gram balloon launch with a cut-away of one balloon at 120 mbar (about 50 kft).  This system should have a very rapid climb at launch, about 1300 ft/min, with a marked decrease to about 500 ft/min after cutaway. 

In addition to the normal APRS beacon, W9YJ-11 on 144.39, there will be a DF beacon on 433.92 MHz.

Thanks for your support,
Howard KC9QBN
BASE DePauw


Re: Mike and My's Flight

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Here is the 17 Jun 15Z wind profile for HUT from the GDAS archive at ready.arl.noaa.gov (you can find these by selecting Archived Meteorology on the left).  

73 de Mark N9XTN

 PRESS HGT(MSL) TEMP DEW PT  WND DIR  WND SPD
 HPA       M      C     C       DEG     M/S
 E = Estimated Surface Height

  950.   572.E
  948.   589.E  28.1   19.4   193.5     5.5
  941.   652.E  27.5   19.0   193.4     6.1
  936.   703.E  26.9   18.8   194.5     6.6
  928.   776.E  26.3   18.5   195.0     6.9
  922.   838.E  25.6   18.3   197.4     7.2
  911.   934.E  25.2   17.7   202.5     7.4
  902.  1028.E  25.0   16.8   211.9     7.6
  891.  1136.E  25.5   15.0   229.2     7.9
  878.  1261.E  27.0   12.2   247.2     7.9
  865.  1401.E  28.4    8.9   259.5     8.3
  851.  1545.E  28.7    6.5   262.9     8.9
  834.  1719.E  27.9    5.8   259.5     9.2
  815.  1920.E  26.3    5.2   252.9     9.2
  796.  2127.E  24.4    4.6   247.0     8.9
  775.  2363.E  22.2    3.2   242.9     8.4
  751.  2635.E  20.0    1.3   241.6     7.6
  726.  2926.E  17.3   -0.2   250.2     6.8
  699.  3236.E  14.4   -0.5   267.3     6.3
  670.  3589.E  11.0   -0.8   285.5     6.7
  642.  3947.E   7.5   -1.6   299.4     8.0
  610.  4361.E   4.2   -3.2   308.1    11.6
  579.  4788.E   0.9   -6.4   300.7    14.1
  547.  5236.E  -2.6   -9.9   295.6    15.2
  513.  5734.E  -6.2  -13.9   291.5    15.8
  480.  6242.E  -9.8  -18.4   287.0    16.6
  447.  6789.E -13.6  -23.8   282.8    18.1
  414.  7358.E -17.7  -30.1   281.9    19.8
  382.  7952.E -22.1  -36.8   283.7    21.1
  351.  8561.E -26.6  -43.1   289.0    22.0
  321.  9189.E -31.4  -48.7   294.4    22.3
  293.  9835.E -36.5  -52.5   297.1    22.0
  266. 10491.E -42.0  -54.1   296.2    20.8
  240. 11158.E -47.7  -57.4   296.0    19.8
  216. 11832.E -53.2  -62.0   291.1    20.1
  194. 12516.E -56.8  -64.9   265.6    20.2
  174. 13209.E -60.8  -65.4   230.4    22.0
  155. 13908.E -65.4  -69.9   194.8    20.2
  138. 14611.E -69.8  -74.2   229.7    22.6
  122. 15327.E -71.4  -77.4   263.1    21.4
  108. 16081.E -65.8  -87.1   290.0    13.9
   95. 16861.E -63.5  -86.8   299.4     5.1
   83. 17659.E -63.6  -84.3   274.6     2.7
   73. 18476.E -62.8  -82.9   340.7     0.7
   64. 19311.E -62.0  -84.7   154.3     2.6
   55. 20171.E -59.7  -90.4   153.1     1.7
   48. 21057.E -57.1  -95.2    97.5     3.0
   42. 21967.E -55.4  -92.0   100.2     4.2
   36. 22901.E -54.0  -86.1    99.0     5.1
   31. 23864.E -52.1  -83.5    97.6     6.1
   27. 24858.E -50.1  -83.2    98.8     6.4
   23. 25888.E -48.1  -84.1    95.8     6.6
   19. 26957.E -46.4  -85.3    91.2     7.4
   16. 28070.E -44.7  -86.4    93.0     8.2
   14. 29236.E -42.9  -87.6   100.3     7.8
   12. 30466.E -41.2  -89.1   105.1     6.7
  

On Fri, Jul 28, 2017 at 8:15 AM, Jerry Gable jerrygable@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


Paul,
The wind data is only available for about 10 days back.

I did find the raw packets for several of the balloons if that helps.  Go to my predictions (GPSL Predictions) and look in the PostFlightCorrelations/CSV_Files folder.

Good luck
 
Jerry Gable
Balloon Flight Prediction tools
http://www.s3research.com



From: "'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL]" <GPSL-noreply@...>
To: "GPSL@..." <gpsl@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2017 4:49 PM
Subject: [GPSL] Mike and My's Flight [2 Attachments]

 
[Attachment(s) from L. Paul Verhage included below]
I'm trying to figure out what altitude Mike and my's flight reached. I've attached a spreadsheet of calculations based on the limited data we have and I attached a screen print of the a packet received during descent from APRS.fi.

The ascent rate for the first 16,000 feet is known from the APRS data. It's either 1,215 fpm if the first ascent record is an outlier or its 1,181 if the first ascent calculation isn't an outlier. I made an assumption the balloon would slow down by 25% at either 40,000 or 50,000 feet. 

The time of flight is estimated to 142 minutes, based on the number of pictures taken during the flight. We need to double check that calculation, because we know the balloon was at 16,639 feet on descent (and two miles away from landing).

At a 142 minute flight, the balloon reached between 135,000 and 1421,000 feet. At a 71 minute flight, the balloon reached between 73,000 and 77,000 feet.

The balloon was a Kaymont 3,000 g balloon and the payload weight was around 8 pounds. So the 140,000 foot flight sounds too high and the 71,000 foot flight sounds too low. Since it's a Kaymont balloon, I don't expect it to fail very early. But the descent packet at 16,639 feet makes sense and gives the balloon 50 minutes to descend 59,000 feet. However, the parachute is 5 feet across and porous (it's made from an old hot air balloon and nearly 20 years old with a lot of experience under its canopy). So it could have descended faster than 1,000 fpm.

Do we have wind data from that day and can we run a calculation on the flight assuming 1,200 fpm ascent, 76,000 foot burst, and 1,000 fpm descent and see if the balloon ends up close to its real landing site? As I recall, the higher the balloon ascended at GPSL, the farther west it landed. And this balloon landed farther southwest of any of my balloons that day (one of them reached into the 90,000 foot range).

Thanks       
 

--
Dr. L. Paul Verhage
Near Space Evangelist






Re: Mike and My's Flight [2 Attachments]

Jerry
 

Paul,
The wind data is only available for about 10 days back.

I did find the raw packets for several of the balloons if that helps.  Go to my predictions (GPSL Predictions) and look in the PostFlightCorrelations/CSV_Files folder.

Good luck
 
Jerry Gable
Balloon Flight Prediction tools
http://www.s3research.com



From: "'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL]" <GPSL-noreply@...>
To: "GPSL@..."
Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2017 4:49 PM
Subject: [GPSL] Mike and My's Flight [2 Attachments]

 
[Attachment(s) from L. Paul Verhage included below]
I'm trying to figure out what altitude Mike and my's flight reached. I've attached a spreadsheet of calculations based on the limited data we have and I attached a screen print of the a packet received during descent from APRS.fi.

The ascent rate for the first 16,000 feet is known from the APRS data. It's either 1,215 fpm if the first ascent record is an outlier or its 1,181 if the first ascent calculation isn't an outlier. I made an assumption the balloon would slow down by 25% at either 40,000 or 50,000 feet. 

The time of flight is estimated to 142 minutes, based on the number of pictures taken during the flight. We need to double check that calculation, because we know the balloon was at 16,639 feet on descent (and two miles away from landing).

At a 142 minute flight, the balloon reached between 135,000 and 1421,000 feet. At a 71 minute flight, the balloon reached between 73,000 and 77,000 feet.

The balloon was a Kaymont 3,000 g balloon and the payload weight was around 8 pounds. So the 140,000 foot flight sounds too high and the 71,000 foot flight sounds too low. Since it's a Kaymont balloon, I don't expect it to fail very early. But the descent packet at 16,639 feet makes sense and gives the balloon 50 minutes to descend 59,000 feet. However, the parachute is 5 feet across and porous (it's made from an old hot air balloon and nearly 20 years old with a lot of experience under its canopy). So it could have descended faster than 1,000 fpm.

Do we have wind data from that day and can we run a calculation on the flight assuming 1,200 fpm ascent, 76,000 foot burst, and 1,000 fpm descent and see if the balloon ends up close to its real landing site? As I recall, the higher the balloon ascended at GPSL, the farther west it landed. And this balloon landed farther southwest of any of my balloons that day (one of them reached into the 90,000 foot range).

Thanks       
 

--
Dr. L. Paul Verhage
Near Space Evangelist



Mike and My's Flight

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I'm trying to figure out what altitude Mike and my's flight reached. I've attached a spreadsheet of calculations based on the limited data we have and I attached a screen print of the a packet received during descent from APRS.fi.

The ascent rate for the first 16,000 feet is known from the APRS data. It's either 1,215 fpm if the first ascent record is an outlier or its 1,181 if the first ascent calculation isn't an outlier. I made an assumption the balloon would slow down by 25% at either 40,000 or 50,000 feet. 

The time of flight is estimated to 142 minutes, based on the number of pictures taken during the flight. We need to double check that calculation, because we know the balloon was at 16,639 feet on descent (and two miles away from landing).

At a 142 minute flight, the balloon reached between 135,000 and 1421,000 feet. At a 71 minute flight, the balloon reached between 73,000 and 77,000 feet.

The balloon was a Kaymont 3,000 g balloon and the payload weight was around 8 pounds. So the 140,000 foot flight sounds too high and the 71,000 foot flight sounds too low. Since it's a Kaymont balloon, I don't expect it to fail very early. But the descent packet at 16,639 feet makes sense and gives the balloon 50 minutes to descend 59,000 feet. However, the parachute is 5 feet across and porous (it's made from an old hot air balloon and nearly 20 years old with a lot of experience under its canopy). So it could have descended faster than 1,000 fpm.

Do we have wind data from that day and can we run a calculation on the flight assuming 1,200 fpm ascent, 76,000 foot burst, and 1,000 fpm descent and see if the balloon ends up close to its real landing site? As I recall, the higher the balloon ascended at GPSL, the farther west it landed. And this balloon landed farther southwest of any of my balloons that day (one of them reached into the 90,000 foot range).

Thanks       
 

--
Dr. L. Paul Verhage
Near Space Evangelist


GPSL APRS Data

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

Does anyone have a copy of APRS data transmitted during GPSL? I would like to look at a copy of Mike's data, KD0MEQ-11. We'd like to estimate a maximum altitude based on time of flight and known (and modeled) ascent rate.

Thanks

Thanks


FW: [SG Coordinators] Call for Papers for post-eclipse national ballooning conference (AHAC 2017)

Jack Crabtree
 


 

From: sgCoordinators [mailto:sgcoordinators-bounces@...] On Behalf Of James Flaten via sgCoordinators
Sent: Friday, July 21, 2017 1:01 PM
To: Space Grant Coordinators Mailing List
Cc: James Flaten ; Matthew Nelson
Subject: [SG Coordinators] Call for Papers for post-eclipse national ballooning conference (AHAC 2017)

 

   My apologies in advance if you get this more than once but we are now one month out from the eclipse so it is a high time to issue a call for papers for the post-eclipse national ballooning conference - AHAC 2017 - to be held here in Minneapolis on October 27-28, 2017.  Please pass this along to all stratospheric ballooning teams in your state, regardless of whether or not they are involved in eclipse ballooning.  Thanks!
                                                                                                                         James

--
James Flaten, Ph.D.
Assoc. Dir. of NASA's MN Space Grant Consortium

e-mail: flate001@...
office phone:  612-626-9295
cell phone:  651-399-2423
skyway office:  205C Akerman Hall
mail room:  107 Akerman Hall

Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
110 Union Street SE
Minneapolis MN  55455

http://www.aem.umn.edu/mnsgc


Re: Recovery of the Last GPSL Flight

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

That was imagine, not image.


On Jul 23, 2017 9:52 AM, "'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL]" <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


I image we descended faster than 1,000 fpm. There was a lot of balloon on the load line and the parachute is 5 feet in diameter and pretty porous.


On Jul 23, 2017 9:11 AM, "Zack Clobes" <zclobes@...> wrote:
I put you on the wrong side of the road.  Sorry.



On Sun, Jul 23, 2017 at 8:01 AM, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from L. Paul Verhage included below]

I picked up the balloon that Mike and I launched (and Jim also, he had a screamer on the payload string). It landed 1/2 mile southwest of the intersection of US 50 and Essex Heights road. The landing was about 10 feet away from a corn field, so if we had landed in that, recovery would have been via combine in another month of two.

The landing site is 2 miles at a heading of 60 degrees from the last reported position of Mike's tracker (which was at 16,000 feet at the time).

We flew a 3,000 gram balloon and about 8 pounds of payload. I can't get Mike's tracking data off APRS.fi anymore, so I can't get an ascent rate for the early flight until I get home. My video camera ran out of memory after 54 minutes, so I can't get a time of flight. I hope I can get at least an ascent time when I get home from the geiger counter data. 

However, it looks like we landed southwest of most flights. The expected maximum altitude was predicted to be over 100,000 feet and I think the location of the landing site bears that out. 

I'm attaching a few screen prints from the video. The first two show other balloons at launch. The last one was taken at 54:38 after the launch, so it might be around 70,000 feet.   

--
Dr. L. Paul Verhage
Near Space Evangelist





Re: Recovery of the Last GPSL Flight [3 Attachments]

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I image we descended faster than 1,000 fpm. There was a lot of balloon on the load line and the parachute is 5 feet in diameter and pretty porous.


On Jul 23, 2017 9:11 AM, "Zack Clobes" <zclobes@...> wrote:
I put you on the wrong side of the road.  Sorry.



On Sun, Jul 23, 2017 at 8:01 AM, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from L. Paul Verhage included below]

I picked up the balloon that Mike and I launched (and Jim also, he had a screamer on the payload string). It landed 1/2 mile southwest of the intersection of US 50 and Essex Heights road. The landing was about 10 feet away from a corn field, so if we had landed in that, recovery would have been via combine in another month of two.

The landing site is 2 miles at a heading of 60 degrees from the last reported position of Mike's tracker (which was at 16,000 feet at the time).

We flew a 3,000 gram balloon and about 8 pounds of payload. I can't get Mike's tracking data off APRS.fi anymore, so I can't get an ascent rate for the early flight until I get home. My video camera ran out of memory after 54 minutes, so I can't get a time of flight. I hope I can get at least an ascent time when I get home from the geiger counter data. 

However, it looks like we landed southwest of most flights. The expected maximum altitude was predicted to be over 100,000 feet and I think the location of the landing site bears that out. 

I'm attaching a few screen prints from the video. The first two show other balloons at launch. The last one was taken at 54:38 after the launch, so it might be around 70,000 feet.   

--
Dr. L. Paul Verhage
Near Space Evangelist


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