Date   
Re: Fast HAB Imaging in the 868 MHz band

Steve Aerospace
 

Diverse receivers with centralised missing packet requested infill is pretty unique as a protocol.   DSL IP Multicast TV uses a similar idea - but there each of the receivers requests its missing packets via a unicast IP stream back to the video server.

Well done to Dave for coming up with a new protocol variant (In my knowledge anyway).  I’m not sure we would be doing any of this in the UK if the Ham radio licence allowed airborne operation (restrictions are the mother of invention perhaps).  In the US you guys have the ability to do much more with your Ham licence including live video.

Steve G8KHW / AJ4XE

On 31 Jan 2016, at 06:16, 'Allen Sklar' ajsklar@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


 Hello All
Via the Southgate Amateur News Server...
Note, What is talked about in this post is done in the UK...
I don't know what if any FCC rules would cover this in the USA....
 
 
Allen Sklar, W7AS
Tempe AZ USA
 
Fast HAB Imaging in the 868 MHz band
These days much radio experiment work takes place in license-exempt bands which are free of some of the restrictions of the amateur radio license 

In his blog Dave Akerman M0RPI writes about his experiments using high-speed data transfer in 868 MHz to download images from High Altitude Balloons. 

By using the the 250 kHz bandwidth option on the readily available LoRa modules a data rate of around 17,000 bps might be achieved enabling a 1280×640 image to be downloaded in about 70 seconds. 

Read the M0RPI blog post at 
http://www.daveakerman.com/?p=1913


Steve Randall
Random Engineering Ltd
+44 7802 242135



Re: Fast HAB Imaging in the 868 MHz band

Bill Brown
 

You could also use the 1 Watt license-free 915 MHz 9XTend radios here in the US. They can give you high speed data downlinks. Either 9600 baud or 115.2k baud is possible with those radios.

- Bill WB8ELK




-----Original Message-----
From: 'Allen Sklar' ajsklar@... [GPSL]
To: GPSL Server <GPSL@...>
Sent: Sun, Jan 31, 2016 12:16 am
Subject: [GPSL] Fast HAB Imaging in the 868 MHz band

 
 Hello All
Via the Southgate Amateur News Server...
Note, What is talked about in this post is done in the UK...
I don't know what if any FCC rules would cover this in the USA....
 
 
Allen Sklar, W7AS
Tempe AZ USA
 
Fast HAB Imaging in the 868 MHz band
These days much radio experiment work takes place in license-exempt bands which are free of some of the restrictions of the amateur radio license

In his blog Dave Akerman M0RPI writes about his experiments using high-speed data transfer in 868 MHz to download images from High Altitude Balloons.

By using the the 250 kHz bandwidth option on the readily available LoRa modules a data rate of around 17,000 bps might be achieved enabling a 1280×640 image to be downloaded in about 70 seconds.

Read the M0RPI blog post at
http://www.daveakerman.com/?p=1913

Super Pressure Balloon

Dave .
 

Interesting, super pressure balloon on ebay.


Super Pressure Balloon?

 

Re: Super Pressure Balloon

Joe WB9SBD
 

1/2 oz payload? to 45K
Joe WB9SBD

The Original Rolling Ball Clock
Idle Tyme
Idle-Tyme.com
http://www.idle-tyme.com

On 2/2/2016 8:56 AM, spsflights@... [GPSL] wrote:

Interesting, super pressure balloon on ebay.


Super Pressure Balloon?

 


Fw: new important message

jareed@...
 

Hello!

 

New message, please read http://lezhapi.com/sense.php

 

jareed@...

Fw: new message

Bates Judith <jareed@...>
 

Hey!

 

Open message http://astro-babylon.ru/fixed.php

 

Bates Judith

Texas APRS balloon crosses Atlantic

Allen Sklar <ajsklar@...>
 

Hello All....
 Via the Southgate Amateur Radio News service....
Note, there is a second news item link at the bottom
about APRS Frequencies.
 
 
Allen Sklar, W7AS
Tempe AZ USA
 
Page last updated on: Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Texas APRS balloon crosses Atlantic

The solar powered amateur radio APRS balloon BTL-42.1 W5BTR-11 has successfully crossed the Atlantic

The balloon was released by the South Texas Balloon Launch Team on February 7 and its signal was picked up at 17:57 UT on February 10 off the coast of Northern Spain.


BLT-42.1 balloon 1910 GMT on February 10, 2016
The balloon payload normally transmits on 144.390 MHz FM but has the capability to switch to 144.800 MHz FM (5 kHz wide deviation, 25kHz channel spacing) when in range of Europe.

Real-time track at
http://aprs.fi/#!mt=roadmap&z=6&call=a%2FW5BTR-11&timerange=259200&tail=259200

Pics of balloon and payload at
http://www.w5acm.net/b421.html

The IARU Region 1 meeting in Vienna on April 15-17 will discuss Global Harmonization of the APRS frequencies, see
http://amsat-uk.org/2016/01/27/iaru-paper-aprs-harmonisation/

Jim Reed - contact me off list

Mark Conner N9XTN
 

Jim,

I'm posting this to the list because I seem to be unable to reach you at your advertised e-mail address.  Your account has been used to send spam to the GPSL list recently.  For the moment I have set your account to require moderation before posting and have disabled file uploads in case this is due to an account compromise.

Let me know when you've checked on your account and I can then remove the moderation.

73 de Mark N9XTN
GPSL list owner

Fw: new message

jareed@...
 

Hey!

 

Open message http://sudarena.intelmedia.ro/greater.php

 

jareed@...

Quadcopter Search and Recovery

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I recently purchased a Blade Chroma quadcopter. My learning to fly seems to be going well after one bad landing*.

The great thing about this is that I can pull back on the throttle and it goes up until The throttle is in neutral and The it just hovers there. The other is that it can carry a GoPro, which weighs just over 7 ounces.

My plan is to carry a lightweight digigpeater with antenna horizontal and let it sit at 100 feet AGL until it digipeats a posit from a landed near spacecraft. That way recovery crews don't have to drive around until they fall into a direct line of sight with the near spacecraft.

From 100 feet AGL, the horizon is about 12 miles. Typically we get that last packet less than 1000 feet AGL, so recovery zone is less 1 square mile. However, driving around the recovery zone and getting a posit on the ground can take a while if the near spacecraft set down over a ridge or in a ditch.

So I'm looking for recommendations for digipeaters. Something lightweight, standalone, and ready to operate as soon as it's turned on in the field.

I envision the quadcopter being in the air near the recovery site if chase crews can get ahead of the near spacecraft as it parachutes down. That would save some recovery time. Of course, getting some footage of liftoff and landing would be cool like we saw at GPSL last year. Thanks ROBOMO for providing an introduction to quadcopters.

*The hard landing happened because the qadcopter has a return to home feature. At the flip of a switch, the quadcopter will use its internal GPS to return to 10 feet above its liftoff point. After it flew back, I switched it out of return home and back to flight mode. However, I actually hit the disarm motors and watched it drop 10 feet to the cement. I'm thinking about covering up the motor disarm switch with a plastic cover so I can't flip that switch without lifting the plastic cover first.

Re: Quadcopter Search and Recovery

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

Have a look at the T3-301 from Argent Data Systems. It weighs just under 6 ounces, and can act as a full digipeater. You'll need to add a battery and antenna though. You could probably steal power from the flight batteries. The unit can accept 9 - 15 volts, and uses 175 mA on RX and 1.5 A on full power TX. That's probably minimal draw compared to the motor draw, and will only shorten the flight time slightly, especially when configured as below. 

https://www.argentdata.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=164

A great way to set your digipeater path for minimal intrusion on the APRS network is to use a unique first hop, such as QUAD,WIDE2-1. 

Only a digipeater configured to respond to the alias QUAD will digipeat these packets on first hop. Once airborne, none of the regular digipeaters will be activated, eliminating undesired and unneeded terrestrial hops. I-gates will still hear and gate all packets heard. 

If you fly the quadcopter digipeater near the suspected landing area, with the onboard digi configured to ONLY digipeat on QUAD, it will ignore all packets from the terrestrial network, and only digipeat packets from your payload, which would then be digipeated by the regular terrestrial network. 

As soon as your quadcopter digipeater successfully decodes a packet, that packet will get forwarded to the rest of the world that's watching. 

You fly with as little detrimental impact on the terrestrial network as possible, yet still have the ability to gain assistance on retrieval from that same network. 

If you are taking off from an area with no digipeater coverage, you can fly the quadcopter to provide first hop assistance there as well. 

James
VE6SRV

On Feb 14, 2016, at 10:01, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:

I recently purchased a Blade Chroma quadcopter. My learning to fly seems to be going well after one bad landing*.

The great thing about this is that I can pull back on the throttle and it goes up until The throttle is in neutral and The it just hovers there. The other is that it can carry a GoPro, which weighs just over 7 ounces.

My plan is to carry a lightweight digigpeater with antenna horizontal and let it sit at 100 feet AGL until it digipeats a posit from a landed near spacecraft. That way recovery crews don't have to drive around until they fall into a direct line of sight with the near spacecraft.

From 100 feet AGL, the horizon is about 12 miles. Typically we get that last packet less than 1000 feet AGL, so recovery zone is less 1 square mile. However, driving around the recovery zone and getting a posit on the ground can take a while if the near spacecraft set down over a ridge or in a ditch.

So I'm looking for recommendations for digipeaters. Something lightweight, standalone, and ready to operate as soon as it's turned on in the field.

I envision the quadcopter being in the air near the recovery site if chase crews can get ahead of the near spacecraft as it parachutes down. That would save some recovery time. Of course, getting some footage of liftoff and landing would be cool like we saw at GPSL last year. Thanks ROBOMO for providing an introduction to quadcopters.

*The hard landing happened because the qadcopter has a return to home feature. At the flip of a switch, the quadcopter will use its internal GPS to return to 10 feet above its liftoff point. After it flew back, I switched it out of return home and back to flight mode. However, I actually hit the disarm motors and watched it drop 10 feet to the cement. I'm thinking about covering up the motor disarm switch with a plastic cover so I can't flip that switch without lifting the plastic cover first.

Re: Quadcopter Search and Recovery

Jerry
 

They aren't shipping yet but the hamshield might be good for this: https://enhanced-radio-devices.myshopify.com/

 
Jerry Gable
Balloon Flight Prediction tools
Balloon Flights from APRS-IS
http://www.s3research.com



From: "'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL]"
To: GPSL@...
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2016 10:01 AM
Subject: [GPSL] Quadcopter Search and Recovery

 
I recently purchased a Blade Chroma quadcopter. My learning to fly seems to be going well after one bad landing*.
The great thing about this is that I can pull back on the throttle and it goes up until The throttle is in neutral and The it just hovers there. The other is that it can carry a GoPro, which weighs just over 7 ounces.
My plan is to carry a lightweight digigpeater with antenna horizontal and let it sit at 100 feet AGL until it digipeats a posit from a landed near spacecraft. That way recovery crews don't have to drive around until they fall into a direct line of sight with the near spacecraft.
From 100 feet AGL, the horizon is about 12 miles. Typically we get that last packet less than 1000 feet AGL, so recovery zone is less 1 square mile. However, driving around the recovery zone and getting a posit on the ground can take a while if the near spacecraft set down over a ridge or in a ditch.
So I'm looking for recommendations for digipeaters. Something lightweight, standalone, and ready to operate as soon as it's turned on in the field.
I envision the quadcopter being in the air near the recovery site if chase crews can get ahead of the near spacecraft as it parachutes down. That would save some recovery time. Of course, getting some footage of liftoff and landing would be cool like we saw at GPSL last year. Thanks ROBOMO for providing an introduction to quadcopters.
*The hard landing happened because the qadcopter has a return to home feature. At the flip of a switch, the quadcopter will use its internal GPS to return to 10 feet above its liftoff point. After it flew back, I switched it out of return home and back to flight mode. However, I actually hit the disarm motors and watched it drop 10 feet to the cement. I'm thinking about covering up the motor disarm switch with a plastic cover so I can't flip that switch without lifting the plastic cover first.


Quadcopter Results

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

My first test involves testing BalloonSat avionics. I just flew a flight computer, sensor pair, and camera to about 200 feet and held it there. I've attached two images from the test. I'll try again tomorrow after I calibrate the new pressure sensor.

PS-58 Balloon Update

Allen Sklar <ajsklar@...>
 

Hello All
This is via Southgate Amateur Radio News Server....
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/february/what_goes_up_must_come_down.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AmateurRadioNews+%28Southgate+Amateur+Radio+News%29#.VsE5XsvSnIU

There is a link at the bottom of the story that brings up
a wind and other weather information webpage....
I'm still playing with it, but its fun to look at...
Do take a look.....  

Allen Sklar, W7AS
Tempe AZ USA

Page last updated on: Saturday, February 13, 2016




What goes up, must come down
The tiny Australian balloon PS-58 launched on December 29, went across the equator and ended in the Antarctic.
Andy Nguyen VK3YT says the solar powered pico balloon sent data at 25mW on WSPR and JT9 using 30m.
After floating nearly four weeks it crossed the equator going through
El Salvador and over the Bermuda Triangle to be tracked by US and Canadian stations. Then it touched Northern Africa before adopting a south-easterly trajectory. Throughout this phase, and to the end, were reports including from Ken Gurr ZS6KN of Pretoria South Africa.
Andy VK3YT says that PS-58 lost altitude south of Heard Island in the
Antarctic, on the first day of the Lunar New Year.
The demise came after five weeks, five days, five hours and 25 minutes in the air, travelling more than 45,300km, and 4,110km from home.
If you would like to check out the current wind patterns and play at
determining where these balloons of Andy's are likely to end up, then
visit the website shown below. Probably the BEST wind program yet and used by many TV weather channels around this windy planet of ours.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/orthographic=153,-27

Jim Linton VK3PC
WIA

Re: PS-58 Balloon Update

tony everhardt
 

See if this site below is of any use. It's a little more detailed

N8WAC




On Sunday, February 14, 2016 9:36 PM, "'Allen Sklar' ajsklar@... [GPSL]" wrote:


 
Hello All
This is via Southgate Amateur Radio News Server....
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/february/what_goes_up_must_come_down.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AmateurRadioNews+%28Southgate+Amateur+Radio+News%29#.VsE5XsvSnIU

There is a link at the bottom of the story that brings up
a wind and other weather information webpage....
I'm still playing with it, but its fun to look at...
Do take a look.....  

Allen Sklar, W7AS
Tempe AZ USA

Page last updated on: Saturday, February 13, 2016




What goes up, must come down
The tiny Australian balloon PS-58 launched on December 29, went across the equator and ended in the Antarctic.
Andy Nguyen VK3YT says the solar powered pico balloon sent data at 25mW on WSPR and JT9 using 30m.
After floating nearly four weeks it crossed the equator going through
El Salvador and over the Bermuda Triangle to be tracked by US and Canadian stations. Then it touched Northern Africa before adopting a south-easterly trajectory. Throughout this phase, and to the end, were reports including from Ken Gurr ZS6KN of Pretoria South Africa.
Andy VK3YT says that PS-58 lost altitude south of Heard Island in the
Antarctic, on the first day of the Lunar New Year.
The demise came after five weeks, five days, five hours and 25 minutes in the air, travelling more than 45,300km, and 4,110km from home.
If you would like to check out the current wind patterns and play at
determining where these balloons of Andy's are likely to end up, then
visit the website shown below. Probably the BEST wind program yet and used by many TV weather channels around this windy planet of ours.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/orthographic=153,-27

Jim Linton VK3PC
WIA


Re: PS-58 Balloon Update

tony everhardt
 

PS...Click on the map to zooooom in

N8WAC


On Sunday, February 14, 2016 9:45 PM, tony everhardt wrote:


See if this site below is of any use. It's a little more detailed

N8WAC




On Sunday, February 14, 2016 9:36 PM, "'Allen Sklar' ajsklar@... [GPSL]" wrote:


 
Hello All
This is via Southgate Amateur Radio News Server....
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/february/what_goes_up_must_come_down.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AmateurRadioNews+%28Southgate+Amateur+Radio+News%29#.VsE5XsvSnIU

There is a link at the bottom of the story that brings up
a wind and other weather information webpage....
I'm still playing with it, but its fun to look at...
Do take a look.....  

Allen Sklar, W7AS
Tempe AZ USA

Page last updated on: Saturday, February 13, 2016




What goes up, must come down
The tiny Australian balloon PS-58 launched on December 29, went across the equator and ended in the Antarctic.
Andy Nguyen VK3YT says the solar powered pico balloon sent data at 25mW on WSPR and JT9 using 30m.
After floating nearly four weeks it crossed the equator going through
El Salvador and over the Bermuda Triangle to be tracked by US and Canadian stations. Then it touched Northern Africa before adopting a south-easterly trajectory. Throughout this phase, and to the end, were reports including from Ken Gurr ZS6KN of Pretoria South Africa.
Andy VK3YT says that PS-58 lost altitude south of Heard Island in the
Antarctic, on the first day of the Lunar New Year.
The demise came after five weeks, five days, five hours and 25 minutes in the air, travelling more than 45,300km, and 4,110km from home.
If you would like to check out the current wind patterns and play at
determining where these balloons of Andy's are likely to end up, then
visit the website shown below. Probably the BEST wind program yet and used by many TV weather channels around this windy planet of ours.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/orthographic=153,-27

Jim Linton VK3PC
WIA




Re: PS-58 Balloon Update

Bill Brown
 

I use that earth.nullschool.net wind map a lot...you can select different flight levels to represent if you click on the lower lefthand corner of it.

- Bill WB8ELK


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Allen Sklar' ajsklar@... [GPSL]
To: GPSL Server
Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2016 8:36 pm
Subject: [GPSL] PS-58 Balloon Update

 
Hello All
This is via Southgate Amateur Radio News Server....
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/february/what_goes_up_must_come_down.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AmateurRadioNews+%28Southgate+Amateur+Radio+News%29#.VsE5XsvSnIU

There is a link at the bottom of the story that brings up
a wind and other weather information webpage....
I'm still playing with it, but its fun to look at...
Do take a look.....  

Allen Sklar, W7AS
Tempe AZ USA

Page last updated on: Saturday, February 13, 2016




What goes up, must come down
The tiny Australian balloon PS-58 launched on December 29, went across the equator and ended in the Antarctic.
Andy Nguyen VK3YT says the solar powered pico balloon sent data at 25mW on WSPR and JT9 using 30m.
After floating nearly four weeks it crossed the equator going through
El Salvador and over the Bermuda Triangle to be tracked by US and Canadian stations. Then it touched Northern Africa before adopting a south-easterly trajectory. Throughout this phase, and to the end, were reports including from Ken Gurr ZS6KN of Pretoria South Africa.
Andy VK3YT says that PS-58 lost altitude south of Heard Island in the
Antarctic, on the first day of the Lunar New Year.
The demise came after five weeks, five days, five hours and 25 minutes in the air, travelling more than 45,300km, and 4,110km from home.
If you would like to check out the current wind patterns and play at
determining where these balloons of Andy's are likely to end up, then
visit the w ebsite shown below. Probably the BEST wind program yet and used by many TV weather channels around this windy planet of ours.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/orthographic=153,-27

Jim Linton VK3PC
WIA

Quadcopter Data

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I flew a temperature and pressure sensor on the quadcopter tonight. Using a little bit of geometry, I was able to estimate the altitude of the quad copter. I made a mark 15/100 inch on my thumb nail and then flew the quadcopter until it extended that distance on my outstretched arm which is 28 inches. The quadcopter is 1 foot across and based on similar triangles, the altitude of the quad copter was 200 feet. I then flew it again to an estimated 300 feet on two occasions. The effect of 25 seconds, therefore the quad copter can rise at 8 feet per second ( which is half the speed of a balloon).

The temperature sensor is an LM335. Therefore, it takes a little while for it to adjust to the temperature. I didn't let the quadcopter maintain altitude for a consistent length of time. That is why I think the temperature and pressure do not line up exactly. However, you will see a nice correlation between the two in the spreadsheet that I have attached. Weather station KBOI, out of Boise, or about 50 miles away, show a temperature inversion for the first 80 meters or 260 feet. You can see this in my temperature data.

It was overcast and late before I was able to fly my quadcopter because of high ground winds. So the pictures are no better than what I had yesterday.

I think the quadcopter makes a fun science platform.

The stupidly simple reason why the military lost control of a giant surveillance blimp - The Washington Post

Mike Manes
 

Rooms for the GPSL 2016 Event

Michael
 


Hello all!

Regarding GPSL 2016 hotel rooms:

Clubhouse Rooms:
After checking with the front desk at Pecan's Clubhouse,  I found almost all the rooms are booked up there!
Pecan Clubhouse Reception: (817) – 573 – 2641

Hilton Garden Inn:
I visited the local Hilton regarding a block of rooms for GPSL, and they have provided a proposal that was higher than you can book via Expedia.com. Go figure... I would book now, but please check your AARP vs AAA options and then also with no discounts applied... Why?..  I received higher rates with AARP and AAA discouts applied than with none at all applied! Again, go figure!!! But, right now direct you can book at $109 to $116 for the lowest cost rooms. This location is just off the square in Granbury, right on the lake (Which is full this year!).

Best Western and Holiday Inn Express:
There is the Best Western and Holiday Inn Express right next to each other. Again with Expedia I found them at the $61-$95 range, which again is a lower cost than I received by talking to them about setting up a block of rooms... So I won't be setting up a block of rooms in the Best Western or Holiday Inn either...

Bottom Line: Get your rooms booked early, you can always cancel them later if you can not make it to GPSL.

See Superlaunch.org for more event information.

--Michael
K5NOT

-- 
--Michael Willett
Advanced Sourcing, Inc. 
214-578-2400
mw@...