Date   
Project: Traveler's flight recap

Zack Clobes W0ZC
 

Just a quick note if you're interested, I have the flight information from yesterday's flight posted online including a YouTube recap video.  We managed to capture a pretty good HD shot of the balloon burst, as well as a ground shot of the package coming down on its parachute.

Lastly, I do have a Digi-key sourceable GPS engine that has been tested good to 33,000m+ and has excellent sensitivity with a passive chip antenna.



Zack Clobes, W0ZC
Project: Traveler
www.projecttraveler.org

Re: M0XER-4 Again

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

She passed by Novosibirsk earlier today! Coming back to a continent under you in less than a week!

James
VE6SRV


On Saturday, October 4, 2014, Mike Manes mrmanes@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:
Wow.  4th trip around the planet in 84 days.  Per Jules Verne, Phileas
Fogg just got in one trip around in 80 days!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Around_the_World_in_Eighty_Days

73 de Mike W5VSI

On 10/4/14 6:59, 'Steve' steve@... [GPSL] wrote:
>
>
> Back in range of the UK again it seems
>
> Steve
>
> G6UIM
>
>
>
>


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GPSL/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GPSL/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    GPSL-digest@...
    GPSL-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    GPSL-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/



--
James
VE6SRV

HAB domain names up for grabs...

Rodney Sparks
 

Hey guys,

Back in 2010, I was thinking about starting a company building and
selling HAB systems, in the style of Estes model rockets (relatively
inexpensive materials with well-thought-out design). When I was
anxious to move on this idea, I bought a few domain names. Since I'm
not doing anything with this idea and I don't plan to (although I'd
still love to, but MUST FOCUS!), I'm offering these domain names to
any HAB people who want them, as they're up for renewal on 10/13 and
I'm not going to renew them:

20milehighclub.com
20milesup.com (my company was going to be "20 miles up", the logo
being an arrow with a "20" stenciled into it...)
DIYspaceflight.com

Any takers? Please e-mail me privately rather than on the list. It's
pseudo first-come, first serve... I'll probably favor someone who's
been involved in the hobby for a while. I'd like to see 'em go to a
good home. ;-)

Thanks,

-Rodney
rodney@...

EOSS 200th Flight Banquet.

Rob Wright
 

Greetings to All!

EOSS would like to welcome you to join us for a celebration of our 200th flight.  The evening banquet will be held November 18, 2014 at the Courtyard by Marriot Cherry Creek, 1475 S. Colorado Blvd, Denver, CO.  Festivities will start with a cash bar at 6:30, and will evolve into a buffet banquet.  Following the buffet there will be a special entertainment honoring many of our members, customers, educators, and public officials who have provided enormous contributions to the success of EOSS for the past 200 flights and 23 years. 

 

The Home-style Dinner Buffet will be $38.00 per person and selections will include:

                Classic Roast Beef with Mushroom Gravy

                Honey Marinated Fried Chicken

                Rosemary Roasted Potatoes

                Steamed Green Beans Almandine

               

So we can make an accurate count, please RSVP as soon as possible and advise how many will be in your party.  RSVP to http://goo.gl/forms/Om18tR12oi or email EOSS200banquet@... before November 11, 2014.   Please address inquiries to the same email address.  A confirmation email and invoice will be emailed to you. 

 

Please pass this invitation on to others who you feel would be interested in attending this memorable event.  We look forward to seeing all present and past members at this celebration.   

 

Rob Wright, KC0UUO, EOSS President

Doug Gentges, N0IX. Committee Member

Marty Griffin, WA0GEH, Committee Member


Re: Balloon Mail successful WB8ELK balloon recovered by W7QO

Leo Bodnar <leo@...>
 

Well of course it decodes to the *6th of October* when my script uploads it to spacenear.us ...


On 6 Oct 2014, at 23:34, Leo Bodnar leo@... [GPSL] wrote:

Mark,

That's what all B-flights do as well.  There is no compressed timestamp available in APRS specification so i just dreamt up my own.

There are encoded time and datestamps in each realtime and backlog message sent from B-**.  Without them there is no way to untangle APRS timing mess.  

There are stations sending packets with 30-60 minutes delays and aprs.fi dutifully lists them under delayed times.  
The worst I had was 18 hours delayed packets from some unlisted igate in Russia.

For example, last B-64 packet was:

2014-10-06 07:10:43 UTC: M0XER-4>APRS64,LD9TK,WIDE2*,qAR,LA9UI-2:!/)IQ1Q_7)O W{h)/A=040836|+fI7&W=r!,|

...note "W{h)" in front of /A=040836 - this is an encoded GPS date/time stamp.  It decodes to "10th of October, 07:10:41" 

Cheers
Leo

Re: Balloon Mail successful WB8ELK balloon recovered by W7QO

Bill Brown
 

On my homebrew APRS transmitters I put a very short beep before or after sending the APRS transmission when I'm flying it on a regular flight. That and knowing when it is timeslotted really helps to identify it. But in my latest code I have it so that it alternates frequency. It transmits every 30 seconds...once on 144.39 and then the next on 144.36 and so on. The end result is a once per minute transmission on 144.39 and also 144.36.

- Bill WB8ELK






-----Original Message-----
From: James Ewen ve6srv@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...>
To: Leo Bodnar Cc: GPSL List
Sent: Mon, Oct 6, 2014 9:03 pm
Subject: Re: [GPSL] Balloon Mail successful WB8ELK balloon recovered by W7QO

 
There are a few things I can add to your "must-have" list. 

Because of the wonderful flexibility of these payloads, and having immediate access to the guy writing the code, think about these features. 

Send a series of tones on frequency immediately before sending your position report for DFing. The tones will be distinctive, allowing one to identify the payload transmission audibly, and if necessary, get a beam pointed at the payload before needing to decode the APRS data.  The OpenTracker line has a function called SQUAWK, which can be used to make the payload send alternating tones in a bee-doo bee-doo pattern. Very difficult to mistake for an APRS packet. 

Switch to an alternate frequency, and do the above. 

One of the hardest things to do when searching for a downed payload is to be able to differentiate your "braaaaaap" from other "braaaaps" out there.  The times slot helps, but there's always someone clobbering, or a far off digipeater making noise out there right when your payload should be up. Getting off the national channel and to a quiet frequency really helps. Oh yeah, get your search teams to turn off beaconing if they switch their APRS radios to the non-standard frequency. 

Of course, you would probably only enable these features once the payload has determined it is on the ground.  Look for altitude below a preset value, and/or look for 0 groundspeed. A combo of both, with some leeway on the speed due to GPS wandering is probably best. Kicking in the DF tones before landing might be an idea so even teams without beams can add in "heard reports" as the payload drops below their local horizon. If the teams are surrounding the payload, these heard reports might be enough to help figure out who's closer and who's further from the payload.  

Of course, Leo's probably not interested in any of this, since all of this is concerning recovering balloons after flight termination, and someone seems to have missed the memo about flights terminating, and just leaves them circling the Earth endlessly!


On Monday, October 6, 2014, Leo Bodnar leo@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


Mark,

That's what all B-flights do as well.  There is no compressed timestamp available in APRS specification so i just dreamt up my own.

There are encoded time and datestamps in each realtime and backlog message sent from B-**.  Without them there is no way to untangle APRS timing mess.  

There are stations sending packets with 30-60 minutes delays and aprs.fi dutifully lists them under delayed times.  
The worst I had was 18 hours delayed packets from some unlisted igate in Russia.

For example, last B-64 packet was:

2014-10-06 07:10:43 UTC: M0XER-4>APRS64,LD9TK,WIDE2*,qAR,LA9UI-2:!/)IQ1Q_7)O W{h)/A=040836|+fI7&W=r!,|

...note "W{h)" in front of /A=040836 - this is an encoded GPS date/time stamp.  It decodes to "10th of October, 07:10:41" 

Cheers
Leo

On 6 Oct 2014, at 22:51, Mark Conner mconner1@... [GPSL] wrote:

Another item to consider is using the hhmmss format for the time spec.  This helps reconstruct logs afterwards, especially data collected from others.  It's really handy to have a good time stamp right in the packet instead of relying on others' clocks.  I can't remember if that's part of the APRS compressed format or not.  We generally run more towards the "plain" format, which is harder on the TX/battery budget but has more flexibility.





--
James
VE6SRV

Re: Experiment Ideas

Dan Wietchy
 

Good... Good...  But you want to collect particulates from.. Say 30k upward and you don't want the atmospheric junk at ground thru 40k. Hence the pump, which can be programmed via picaxe or Arduino to turn on or off at precise altitudes. Then again, maybe you do want to collect particulates from the ground up?  Your call.  

Sent from Dan/KL1JP 

On Oct 6, 2014, at 18:06, "'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL]" <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:

 

How about using an upward facing cone to collect and concentrate air. That way you don't need a pump.

As for sampling, use a rotating disk of filter paper at the exit of the cone. By spinning the filter paper once in 90 minutes, you can determine the approximate altitude of each sample trapped in the filter paper.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 5:37 PM, "powellite52 powellite52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


Volcanic ash collection. Small vacuum pump, paper filters, etc...  

See if volcanic ash from the recent eruption in Iceland or Hawaii has made it up that high. 

Sent from Dan/KL1JP 

On Oct 6, 2014, at 13:41, "morgamp52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL@...> wrote:

 

My senior HS physics/ARHAB class has 28 kids this year!  I am hurting for good and challenging experiments suited for high school students.  Past experiments have included

1.  Calculating speed of sound at high altitude with sonar system

2.  Estimating humidity using "poor mans" photometer

3.  Finding the Pfotzer max with Geiger counter

4.  Developing a DTMF decoder circuit


If you or your class have flown some interesting experiments let me know....They do pretty well with PicAxe development and learning simple programing such as data logger etc....

We don't fly cats or other scurges to the world!


Thanks

Mike  N0MPM

Pella Explores Near Space



Re: Experiment Ideas

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

The biggest problem is creating a viable glider airframe that glides well at supersonic as well as subsonic speeds. A high altitude release will hopefully see the glider flying at a very steep nose down attitude, at high speeds due to the limited airflow over the flight control surfaces. Watch the Felix Baumgartner videos... Until he got down around 50,000 feet or so there was nothing to push against to control his attitude. Any aircraft without thrust is going to fall like a rock until it can grab enough air to allow the flight surfaces to get the nose pointed the right way.  As the atmospheric drag increases, the flight speed will drop and angle of attack will decrease until the glider gets into the "thick soup" that we live in, and is flying "normally".

The glider has to be robust enough to survive the high speed low drag portion of the drop, as well as be able to fly decently down low. It needs to be strong enough to hang onto all of its parts when transitioning from rock mode to aircraft mode.

There's a bit of stuff to worry about when dropping a glider...


On Monday, October 6, 2014, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


My problem wasn't the glider coming down, it was that it didn't fly very far. Or at least as far as I expected.

A glider has to fly faster at 50,000 feet to remain airborne. I wonder if Styrofoam gliders can't make it by gravity alone.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 7:36 PM, "James Ewen" <ve6srv@...> wrote:
What is difficult about releasing a glider from the payload? As long as you cut it away before burst, gravity takes over looking after maintaining airspeed. Trust me, the glider will come down, it won't disappear into space. 



On Monday, October 6, 2014, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


The glider launch system. I think it's difficult to properly release a glider when the balloon is climbing at a thousand feet per minute straight up

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 3:41 PM, "morgamp52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL@...> wrote:


My senior HS physics/ARHAB class has 28 kids this year!  I am hurting for good and challenging experiments suited for high school students.  Past experiments have included

1.  Calculating speed of sound at high altitude with sonar system

2.  Estimating humidity using "poor mans" photometer

3.  Finding the Pfotzer max with Geiger counter

4.  Developing a DTMF decoder circuit


If you or your class have flown some interesting experiments let me know....They do pretty well with PicAxe development and learning simple programing such as data logger etc....

We don't fly cats or other scurges to the world!


Thanks

Mike  N0MPM

Pella Explores Near Space







--
James
VE6SRV




--
James
VE6SRV

Re: Balloon Mail successful WB8ELK balloon recovered by W7QO

Alan Adamson
 

oh, I have a whole laundry list of descent functions. Most of what you wrote is included. I just haven't been focused on *descent* much... until Bill launched one at me :)...

Alan

On 10/6/2014 10:03 PM, James Ewen ve6srv@... [GPSL] wrote:
There are a few things I can add to your "must-have" list.


Because of the wonderful flexibility of these payloads, and having
immediate access to the guy writing the code, think about these features.

Re: Experiment Ideas

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

How about using an upward facing cone to collect and concentrate air. That way you don't need a pump.

As for sampling, use a rotating disk of filter paper at the exit of the cone. By spinning the filter paper once in 90 minutes, you can determine the approximate altitude of each sample trapped in the filter paper.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 5:37 PM, "powellite52 powellite52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


Volcanic ash collection. Small vacuum pump, paper filters, etc...  

See if volcanic ash from the recent eruption in Iceland or Hawaii has made it up that high. 

Sent from Dan/KL1JP 

On Oct 6, 2014, at 13:41, "morgamp52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL@...> wrote:

 

My senior HS physics/ARHAB class has 28 kids this year!  I am hurting for good and challenging experiments suited for high school students.  Past experiments have included

1.  Calculating speed of sound at high altitude with sonar system

2.  Estimating humidity using "poor mans" photometer

3.  Finding the Pfotzer max with Geiger counter

4.  Developing a DTMF decoder circuit


If you or your class have flown some interesting experiments let me know....They do pretty well with PicAxe development and learning simple programing such as data logger etc....

We don't fly cats or other scurges to the world!


Thanks

Mike  N0MPM

Pella Explores Near Space



Re: Balloon Mail successful WB8ELK balloon recovered by W7QO

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

There are a few things I can add to your "must-have" list. 

Because of the wonderful flexibility of these payloads, and having immediate access to the guy writing the code, think about these features. 

Send a series of tones on frequency immediately before sending your position report for DFing. The tones will be distinctive, allowing one to identify the payload transmission audibly, and if necessary, get a beam pointed at the payload before needing to decode the APRS data.  The OpenTracker line has a function called SQUAWK, which can be used to make the payload send alternating tones in a bee-doo bee-doo pattern. Very difficult to mistake for an APRS packet. 

Switch to an alternate frequency, and do the above. 

One of the hardest things to do when searching for a downed payload is to be able to differentiate your "braaaaaap" from other "braaaaps" out there.  The times slot helps, but there's always someone clobbering, or a far off digipeater making noise out there right when your payload should be up. Getting off the national channel and to a quiet frequency really helps. Oh yeah, get your search teams to turn off beaconing if they switch their APRS radios to the non-standard frequency. 

Of course, you would probably only enable these features once the payload has determined it is on the ground.  Look for altitude below a preset value, and/or look for 0 groundspeed. A combo of both, with some leeway on the speed due to GPS wandering is probably best. Kicking in the DF tones before landing might be an idea so even teams without beams can add in "heard reports" as the payload drops below their local horizon. If the teams are surrounding the payload, these heard reports might be enough to help figure out who's closer and who's further from the payload.  

Of course, Leo's probably not interested in any of this, since all of this is concerning recovering balloons after flight termination, and someone seems to have missed the memo about flights terminating, and just leaves them circling the Earth endlessly!


On Monday, October 6, 2014, Leo Bodnar leo@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


Mark,

That's what all B-flights do as well.  There is no compressed timestamp available in APRS specification so i just dreamt up my own.

There are encoded time and datestamps in each realtime and backlog message sent from B-**.  Without them there is no way to untangle APRS timing mess.  

There are stations sending packets with 30-60 minutes delays and aprs.fi dutifully lists them under delayed times.  
The worst I had was 18 hours delayed packets from some unlisted igate in Russia.

For example, last B-64 packet was:

2014-10-06 07:10:43 UTC: M0XER-4>APRS64,LD9TK,WIDE2*,qAR,LA9UI-2:!/)IQ1Q_7)O W{h)/A=040836|+fI7&W=r!,|

...note "W{h)" in front of /A=040836 - this is an encoded GPS date/time stamp.  It decodes to "10th of October, 07:10:41" 

Cheers
Leo

On 6 Oct 2014, at 22:51, Mark Conner mconner1@... [GPSL] wrote:

Another item to consider is using the hhmmss format for the time spec.  This helps reconstruct logs afterwards, especially data collected from others.  It's really handy to have a good time stamp right in the packet instead of relying on others' clocks.  I can't remember if that's part of the APRS compressed format or not.  We generally run more towards the "plain" format, which is harder on the TX/battery budget but has more flexibility.





--
James
VE6SRV

Re: Experiment Ideas

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

My problem wasn't the glider coming down, it was that it didn't fly very far. Or at least as far as I expected.

A glider has to fly faster at 50,000 feet to remain airborne. I wonder if Styrofoam gliders can't make it by gravity alone.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 7:36 PM, "James Ewen" <ve6srv@...> wrote:
What is difficult about releasing a glider from the payload? As long as you cut it away before burst, gravity takes over looking after maintaining airspeed. Trust me, the glider will come down, it won't disappear into space. 



On Monday, October 6, 2014, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


The glider launch system. I think it's difficult to properly release a glider when the balloon is climbing at a thousand feet per minute straight up

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 3:41 PM, "morgamp52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL@...> wrote:


My senior HS physics/ARHAB class has 28 kids this year!  I am hurting for good and challenging experiments suited for high school students.  Past experiments have included

1.  Calculating speed of sound at high altitude with sonar system

2.  Estimating humidity using "poor mans" photometer

3.  Finding the Pfotzer max with Geiger counter

4.  Developing a DTMF decoder circuit


If you or your class have flown some interesting experiments let me know....They do pretty well with PicAxe development and learning simple programing such as data logger etc....

We don't fly cats or other scurges to the world!


Thanks

Mike  N0MPM

Pella Explores Near Space







--
James
VE6SRV

Re: Experiment Ideas

Bill Brown
 

We released our paper airplane glider via a command to my Iridium modem payload which activated a servo that released the glider. We did this while it was parachuting back down attached to our main payload since our balloon burst way way lower in altitude than expected.  It had no problem releasing even though it was probably thrashing around pretty good during the main payload descent.

- Bill WB8ELK



-----Original Message-----
From: James Ewen ve6srv@... [GPSL]
To: L. Paul Verhage
Cc: GPSL
Sent: Mon, Oct 6, 2014 8:36 pm
Subject: Re: [GPSL] Experiment Ideas

 
What is difficult about releasing a glider from the payload? As long as you cut it away before burst, gravity takes over looking after maintaining airspeed. Trust me, the glider will come down, it won't disappear into space. 



On Monday, October 6, 2014, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


The glider launch system. I think it's difficult to properly release a glider when the balloon is climbing at a thousand feet per minute straight up
Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards
On Oct 6, 2014 3:41 PM, "morgamp52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL@...> wrote:


My senior HS physics/ARHAB class has 28 kids this year!  I am hurting for good and challenging experiments suited for high school students.  Past experiments have included
1.  Calculating speed of sound at high altitude with sonar system
2.  Estimating humidity using "poor mans" photometer
3.  Finding the Pfotzer max with Geiger counter
4.  Developing a DTMF decoder circuit

If you or your class have flown some interesting experiments let me know....They do pretty well with PicAxe development and learning simple programing such as data logger etc....
We don't fly cats or other scurges to the world!

Thanks
Mike  N0MPM
Pella Explores Near Space






--
James
VE6SRV

Re: Experiment Ideas

Bill Brown
 

The 4-foot long traditional-style paper airplane glider (orange construction paper) we flew a few months ago was trimmed with a left turn bank with a shallow stall. We released it from 65,000 feet with the nose pointed slightly downwards. The interesting thing is that is fell faster than our main payload until about 32,000 feet. After that the glider kept gaining altitude compared to the parachuting payload. The glider stayed aloft 12 minutes longer than the main payload and flew 5 miles downrange in tight circles. We tracked the glider via a tiny pAVA RTTY tracker on 434 MHz running with two AAA batteries. The main payload landed in power lines. The glider landed in a dense forest but managed to fall through all the trees and was resting right on the forest floor.

- Bill WB8ELK

We flew this as part of the Global Space Balloon Challenge and won 3rd in our category. It was a fun flight that we pulled together within a week once we decided to participate.


-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Manes mrmanes@... [GPSL]
To: L. Paul Verhage ; GPSL
Sent: Mon, Oct 6, 2014 6:44 pm
Subject: Re: [GPSL] Experiment Ideas

 
Sure. Note carefully the caveat re being properly trimmed prior to
flight, however. And aerodynamics get squirrely way up there.
How did you track your glider and was it damaged on recovery?
73 de Mike W5VSI

On 10/6/14 17:18, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] wrote:
> Does this happen for aircraft naturally? I'm wondering if it will work
> for gliders in a passive flight mode. Several of my glider tests did not
> work out well. One that was released at 50,000 feet didn't even fly a
> mile as best as I can tell.
>
> Paul Verhage
> PhD
> Near Space Evangelist
> Onwards and Upwards
>

Re: Balloon Mail successful WB8ELK balloon recovered by W7QO

Alan Adamson
 

Thanks Mark. I encode both the date and time in a compressed format in both my live beacons and my log beacons (similar to how Leo does it as I just saw his response to same) - this isn't apart of the aprs spec, but helps me when I push to snus.

While there is a time format version for compressed posit/telemetry the date/time are not compressed but just ascii.

Further, Hes at aprs.fi, when he gets a posit from aprs.si, doesn't use any form of the date/time, he uses his own.

As luck would have it... Hes, I, Bill Brown, Bob Bruninga and a couple people have just been discussion this very issue in hopes of finding a way to push historical posit to the aprs.fi environment to *fill* in the track.... We'll see where that whole conversation goes - hopefully somewhere good.

Alan

On 10/6/2014 5:51 PM, Mark Conner wrote:

Another item to consider is using the hhmmss format for the time spec.
This helps reconstruct logs afterwards, especially data collected from
others. It's really handy to have a good time stamp right in the packet
instead of relying on others' clocks. I can't remember if that's part
of the APRS compressed format or not. We generally run more towards the
"plain" format, which is harder on the TX/battery budget but has more
flexibility.

Re: Experiment Ideas

James Ewen VE6SRV
 

What is difficult about releasing a glider from the payload? As long as you cut it away before burst, gravity takes over looking after maintaining airspeed. Trust me, the glider will come down, it won't disappear into space. 



On Monday, October 6, 2014, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] <GPSL-noreply@...> wrote:


The glider launch system. I think it's difficult to properly release a glider when the balloon is climbing at a thousand feet per minute straight up

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 3:41 PM, "morgamp52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL@...> wrote:


My senior HS physics/ARHAB class has 28 kids this year!  I am hurting for good and challenging experiments suited for high school students.  Past experiments have included

1.  Calculating speed of sound at high altitude with sonar system

2.  Estimating humidity using "poor mans" photometer

3.  Finding the Pfotzer max with Geiger counter

4.  Developing a DTMF decoder circuit


If you or your class have flown some interesting experiments let me know....They do pretty well with PicAxe development and learning simple programing such as data logger etc....

We don't fly cats or other scurges to the world!


Thanks

Mike  N0MPM

Pella Explores Near Space







--
James
VE6SRV

Re: Experiment Ideas

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

I watched videos of the drop and then one case, the glider was recovered just underneath where released.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 5:44 PM, "Mike Manes" <mrmanes@...> wrote:
Sure. Note carefully the caveat re being properly trimmed prior to
flight, however.  And aerodynamics get squirrely way up there.
How did you track your glider and was it damaged on recovery?
73 de Mike W5VSI

On 10/6/14 17:18, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] wrote:
Does this happen for aircraft naturally? I'm wondering if it will work
for gliders in a passive flight mode. Several of my glider tests did not
work out well. One that was released at 50,000 feet didn't even fly a
mile as best as I can tell.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

Re: Experiment Ideas

Mike Manes
 

Sure. Note carefully the caveat re being properly trimmed prior to
flight, however. And aerodynamics get squirrely way up there.
How did you track your glider and was it damaged on recovery?
73 de Mike W5VSI

On 10/6/14 17:18, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] wrote:
Does this happen for aircraft naturally? I'm wondering if it will work
for gliders in a passive flight mode. Several of my glider tests did not
work out well. One that was released at 50,000 feet didn't even fly a
mile as best as I can tell.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

Re: Experiment Ideas

Dan Wietchy
 

Volcanic ash collection. Small vacuum pump, paper filters, etc...  

See if volcanic ash from the recent eruption in Iceland or Hawaii has made it up that high. 

Sent from Dan/KL1JP 

On Oct 6, 2014, at 13:41, "morgamp52@... [GPSL]" <GPSL@...> wrote:

 

My senior HS physics/ARHAB class has 28 kids this year!  I am hurting for good and challenging experiments suited for high school students.  Past experiments have included

1.  Calculating speed of sound at high altitude with sonar system

2.  Estimating humidity using "poor mans" photometer

3.  Finding the Pfotzer max with Geiger counter

4.  Developing a DTMF decoder circuit


If you or your class have flown some interesting experiments let me know....They do pretty well with PicAxe development and learning simple programing such as data logger etc....

We don't fly cats or other scurges to the world!


Thanks

Mike  N0MPM

Pella Explores Near Space

Re: Experiment Ideas

L. Paul Verhage KD4STH
 

Does this happen for aircraft naturally? I'm wondering if it will work for gliders in a passive flight mode. Several of my glider tests did not work out well. One that was released at 50,000 feet didn't even fly a mile as best as I can tell.

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards

On Oct 6, 2014 4:52 PM, "Mike Manes" <mrmanes@...> wrote:
Not a big deal.  Haul it up by the nose and cut it away.  It'll do a
hammerhead stall, fall off on wing and nose over into a nice dive that
will stabilize to a decent glide - assuming you got it trimmed nicely
before flight.

I've done this maneuver in a TF9J back in the 60's.  Works slick, altho
it did rather irritate my instructor!

73 de Mike W5VSI

On 10/6/14 16:38, 'L. Paul Verhage' nearsys@... [GPSL] wrote:
The glider launch system. I think it's difficult to properly release a
glider when the balloon is climbing at a thousand feet per minute
straight up

Paul Verhage
PhD
Near Space Evangelist
Onwards and Upwards