Winterizing


Jim Hooker
 

For those of us who live in areas where this is the end of the season and freezing in in the near future, I have stolen an idea and made a tool to make winterizing inboard engine and head an easy chore. I have for several years used the seastrainer as the feed location for the rv antifreeze. Someone sells special funnels to screw in to the top to upend the bottles into, but not having one for several years I have just used the strainer body. This year I visited my local hardware and found that a 2” pvc fitting screws right in and with about 3” of pvc pipe and a 2 to 3” adapter makes a good high fitting to get above the step. (See photo) Then, pump the water out of the strainer, insert your new funnel, close the seacock, (this order assumes you are on the hard) upend a bottle of antifreeze into your funnel, and go to town with the head. I use a full gallon in the head making sure the ball valve is open part way to get some into the body around the ball. Then it’s just start the engine and upend a couple more bottles so the engine pumps it all through the engine and exhaust. The fitting should be less than $12 and should last. Easier than disconnecting hoses.

Jim Hooker
sv Niamh (#278)
Detroit


gabriel warren
 

Perhaps my engine (1GM10) winterization procedure could contribute:

I cut the hose from the engine water intake and inserted a T, with a plug normally on the T part. To winterize I close the intake seacock, remove the plug, and insert the bottom of a funnel and hose affair that is high enough to be accessible from the cockpit. Then, and this is critical, I use a Vise-Grip needle nose to clamp the hose for the cooling water when the thermostat is open. This forces the antifreeze into the block before the temperature is high enough to close the thermostat. Then, from the cockpit, I start the engine, while pouring antifreeze into the funnel and observing what is emerging from the exhaust. When I am satisfied that antifreeze only being spit out, done for another year.

This has kept Koremikre’s engine alive through a lot of Nova Scotia winters, and involves only a plastic T, a funnel and a bit of hose.

Hope it helps,

Gabriel

On Nov 15, 2022, at 3:37 PM, Jim Hooker <jahooker@...> wrote:

For those of us who live in areas where this is the end of the season and freezing in in the near future, I have stolen an idea and made a tool to make winterizing inboard engine and head an easy chore. I have for several years used the seastrainer as the feed location for the rv antifreeze. Someone sells special funnels to screw in to the top to upend the bottles into, but not having one for several years I have just used the strainer body. This year I visited my local hardware and found that a 2” pvc fitting screws right in and with about 3” of pvc pipe and a 2 to 3” adapter makes a good high fitting to get above the step. (See photo) Then, pump the water out of the strainer, insert your new funnel, close the seacock, (this order assumes you are on the hard) upend a bottle of antifreeze into your funnel, and go to town with the head. I use a full gallon in the head making sure the ball valve is open part way to get some into the body around the ball. Then it’s just start the engine and upend a couple more bottles so the engine pumps it all through the engine and exhaust. The fitting should be less than $12 and should last. Easier than disconnecting hoses.

Jim Hooker
sv Niamh (#278)
Detroit






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