Trailer wanted, but I know nothing about them #trailer


Hollie Butler
 

I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)


sjoyh10@outlook.com <sjoyh10@...>
 

Please remove me from this list


From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> on behalf of Hollie Butler <sail@...>
Sent: Friday, April 1, 2022 5:58:18 PM
To: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] Trailer wanted, but I know nothing about them #trailer
 
I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)


Peter Williams
 

By the time your done the 4 to 5,000 is about right . 3 for a used trailer, 1 for rigging, 1 for contingency…. 6A1C29C0-9A95-43B9-A65F-4DFF882AFAA7.jpeg
C248E2C2-1065-43C7-B52D-B3614B0130CA.jpeg


-----Original Message-----
From: Hollie Butler <sail@...>
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 1, 2022 6:58 pm
Subject: [Flicka20] Trailer wanted, but I know nothing about them #trailer

I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)


k b
 

I’m no expert, but I too needed a flicka trailer and learned a few things.

1.  The Flicka is a heavy boat; very heavy for it’s size.  About 6,000 lbs dry, and then there’s water tank & fuel tank fluids, equipment of all sorts, etc.  This means that when you add the trailer itself, in most states there are mandatory requirements for brakes, 8 foot width limits (boat, trailer, and anything else on the load).  More than 8’ wide and most states have permit requirements, depending on the highways.  

2. To pull the trailer you will need a large pickup at a minimum, preferably a Ford 250 or Chevy 2500 class Pickup, or similar with a large engine.  Diesel engine is even better, especially if you are planning to pull the boat on long up and downhill grades (think mountains).  The heavier duty pickups have the brake systems and if available, engine braking, for long down hill grades passing thru mountain ranges.  It may be essential to provide special load leveling equipment to transfer some of the trailer weight to the trailer hitch on the truck.  If the load is 10,000 lbs, the trailer hitch, truck equipment, etc. must be suitable for a 10,000 lbs towing load.

3.  Trailer.  Lots of alternatives, but the typical choices are the custom trailer built for the flicka, a flatbed trailer, a car hauler trailer, or possibly a rental trailer.  Two important considerations: Whereas a custom trailer for a flicka will come with supports that hold the boat up and provide for tie downs to keep the boat upright and locked to the trailer, the other types mentioned will require some sort of cradle arrangement or frame tied down to the trailer.  You may be able to find a custom cradle built or modified for a flicka at relatively low price.  I've got an older steel one modified for the flicka, less the screw jacks, you can have for $500, but you would have to pick it up in Marquette, MI.  That’s a long way away from where I guess you are located.  How big a trailer?  I’d recommend one with a load capacity of 10,000 lbs. and two axles at a minimum. A ton or so less would work, depending on your boat, associated stuff, and what ever is used to hold the flicka on the trailer.  Before I bought a custom trailer, I used a heavy duty low flatbed and the cradle mentioned above.  Make sure the trailer has new tires (check the manufacture date on the tires as they deteriorate sitting outside).  If you decide to use a used trailer,  have it thoroughly inspected by an expert and make sure you tell the expert how you plan to use the trailer.

Questions?  Let the Flicka 20 group know.  There are a lot of us who have a wide range of experience and bought a Flicka rather than a larger boat for, among other reasons, it is relatively easy to haul it a 55MPH between locations you want to go sailing.

Ken
Agave Azul
mndkb@...


On Friday, April 1, 2022, 4:14 PM, Hollie Butler <sail@...> wrote:

I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)


CaptainJohn49
 

I think Agave has some very sound advice.  I would like to ad that the drum brakes on most trailers do NOT work well with the weight of the Flicka if used in the mountains.  The previous owner of my Flicka sold me his baby and his Triad Flicka trailer.  The trailer is Forest Green; not a normal Triad color.  I asked him why he repainted it and he told me on a long down hill the trailer brakes caught on fire and burnt the trailer, trailer tires and started to burn the Flicka.  He was able to put it out before he lost the boat but the trailer suffered extensive damage.  If you’re a flat- lander you should be OK.  If not get something with disc brakes.  I have disc brakes on 2 of my trailers and they work much better.

I spent $27,000 on the purchase of my Flicka with trailer and another $25,000 on a used RAM 3500 to pull it.

CaptainJohn49


On Apr 1, 2022, at 21:07, k b via groups.io <mndkb@...> wrote:

 I’m no expert, but I too needed a flicka trailer and learned a few things.

1.  The Flicka is a heavy boat; very heavy for it’s size.  About 6,000 lbs dry, and then there’s water tank & fuel tank fluids, equipment of all sorts, etc.  This means that when you add the trailer itself, in most states there are mandatory requirements for brakes, 8 foot width limits (boat, trailer, and anything else on the load).  More than 8’ wide and most states have permit requirements, depending on the highways.  

2. To pull the trailer you will need a large pickup at a minimum, preferably a Ford 250 or Chevy 2500 class Pickup, or similar with a large engine.  Diesel engine is even better, especially if you are planning to pull the boat on long up and downhill grades (think mountains).  The heavier duty pickups have the brake systems and if available, engine braking, for long down hill grades passing thru mountain ranges.  It may be essential to provide special load leveling equipment to transfer some of the trailer weight to the trailer hitch on the truck.  If the load is 10,000 lbs, the trailer hitch, truck equipment, etc. must be suitable for a 10,000 lbs towing load.

3.  Trailer.  Lots of alternatives, but the typical choices are the custom trailer built for the flicka, a flatbed trailer, a car hauler trailer, or possibly a rental trailer.  Two important considerations: Whereas a custom trailer for a flicka will come with supports that hold the boat up and provide for tie downs to keep the boat upright and locked to the trailer, the other types mentioned will require some sort of cradle arrangement or frame tied down to the trailer.  You may be able to find a custom cradle built or modified for a flicka at relatively low price.  I've got an older steel one modified for the flicka, less the screw jacks, you can have for $500, but you would have to pick it up in Marquette, MI.  That’s a long way away from where I guess you are located.  How big a trailer?  I’d recommend one with a load capacity of 10,000 lbs. and two axles at a minimum. A ton or so less would work, depending on your boat, associated stuff, and what ever is used to hold the flicka on the trailer.  Before I bought a custom trailer, I used a heavy duty low flatbed and the cradle mentioned above.  Make sure the trailer has new tires (check the manufacture date on the tires as they deteriorate sitting outside).  If you decide to use a used trailer,  have it thoroughly inspected by an expert and make sure you tell the expert how you plan to use the trailer.

Questions?  Let the Flicka 20 group know.  There are a lot of us who have a wide range of experience and bought a Flicka rather than a larger boat for, among other reasons, it is relatively easy to haul it a 55MPH between locations you want to go sailing.

Ken
Agave Azul
mndkb@...




Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Friday, April 1, 2022, 4:14 PM, Hollie Butler <sail@...> wrote:

I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)


Liveaboard Life
 

Hi, Holly,

Lots of good suggestions and advice from others. I will share my experience, in hope that it is helpful.

We purchased a Flicka that came with a trailer. The trailer has curved bunk supports under the hull, and a keel support. We took the trailer to a company that works on big rig trailers (the owner also trailers his boats). We were lucky. The trailer needed minor work only. Tires, bearings, brakes were all in good order. We replaced the spare (it was not a trailer tire). We removed surface rust, painted with Ospho, where needed, then paint, and added reflective tape. Replaced lights. Replaced carpet on bunks and keel plank. Replaced the battery.

Last October, we towed our Flicka from Olympia, WA to San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico. 2,000 miles plus. Some freeway miles, some smaller roads including short hills but steeper grades than you find on freeways.

We towed her with our 2013 F150 ecoboost pickup. The truck has the trailer package and bags to aid suspension. We also had our pop-up camper on the truck so that added some weight. 

All packaged up, we were about 8' wide (legal limit), just under 13' high, and about 7,000 pounds on the trailer. I've forgotten what the trailer overall length is.

Recommendations:

Buy a new trailer, if possible. Or, buy a trailer that has not been in salt water.

Use a half-ton truck or larger to tow it. 

If you haven't towed a trailer before, get someone with experience to help you with some practice before you tow from OR to WA. Or, better yet, get someone with a truck and towing experience to tow it for you.

If you tow her to Puget Sound, I highly recommend Swantown Marina in Olympia, WA as a launch point. You can get a launch with the travel lift and keep your trailer out of the salt water. They have reasonable slip rates and storage rates. (We live aboard there, on our other boat.)

Have fun with your Flicka! Hope to see you on the water!
Noreen Light
SV Sweethaven
1983 PCS Flicka 20
SV Soundhaven 
1990 Island Packet 32


Daryl Clark
 

Hollie,

More things to consider when researching your options for a trailer:

Do you plan to launch from the trailer or use a travel lift or crane for launch. When you look at trailers, like the TRIAD, you are getting TORSION axles and a very low center of gravity - e.g. the boat remains just a few inches off the ground when traveling. You are also getting a design that will tow the load safely and with the proper load leveling hitch and anti sway bars can be towed somewhat effortlessly. As far as getting the trailer to you: check to see if TRIAD or other maker has a dealer in your area. They can arrange for delivery and setup.

When I picked up my TRIAD trailer, at that time they were in CONNECTICUT, he had to weld the load leveling hitch components that get installed on the trailer - due to the short length of frame up forward near the tongue connection. Make sure you research both the vehicle, load leveling hitch and trailer and make certain they will work together!

Regarding a tow vehicle - yes the load does approach 10,000 pounds (trailer weight + boat dry weight + gear and fuel, etc). We used a Toyota Tundra with 5.7 liter gas engine with a load leveling hitch and could travel all day long at 70 MPH. The Tundra and most other pickups in that class require a load leveling hitch with anti sway bars to handle that load.

If you get a flat bed trailer and then add a cradle on top of it, the boat will ride much higher in the air. You will also more than likely not be able to launch from the trailer - you may not want to anyway.

Most states have adopted some pretty stringent rules on what kind've of braking system needs to be used for hauling this heavy of a load. Electric disk brakes are the best solution for the best possible control. Also, when traveling with this load - beware of BRIDGE ABUTTMENTS (that point where the road meets a bridge surface) it causes the truck and trailer to oscillate in the vertical plane.

Also make sure that you tied the rudder down - it will fly off if the bolt locking it on the pintal sheers (don't ask me how I know)
--
Daryl Clark
S/Y Intuition - PSC 31 # 54
Formerly s/y Flicka 433 - Ballo Liscio
S/Y Jackito - Dana 222


k b
 




Daryl,

I second your advice.  If you can fined a triad at a price you can afford, that’s the best way to haul your Flicka.  Tying the rudder down is very good advice; if it’s a long haul, I’d remove the tiller, take the rudder off and store both in the cabin.

Ken
Agave Azul

On Saturday, April 2, 2022, 7:15 AM, Daryl Clark <dlclark@...> wrote:

Hollie,

More things to consider when researching your options for a trailer:

Do you plan to launch from the trailer or use a travel lift or crane for launch. When you look at trailers, like the TRIAD, you are getting TORSION axles and a very low center of gravity - e.g. the boat remains just a few inches off the ground when traveling. You are also getting a design that will tow the load safely and with the proper load leveling hitch and anti sway bars can be towed somewhat effortlessly. As far as getting the trailer to you: check to see if TRIAD or other maker has a dealer in your area. They can arrange for delivery and setup.

When I picked up my TRIAD trailer, at that time they were in CONNECTICUT, he had to weld the load leveling hitch components that get installed on the trailer - due to the short length of frame up forward near the tongue connection. Make sure you research both the vehicle, load leveling hitch and trailer and make certain they will work together!

Regarding a tow vehicle - yes the load does approach 10,000 pounds (trailer weight + boat dry weight + gear and fuel, etc). We used a Toyota Tundra with 5.7 liter gas engine with a load leveling hitch and could travel all day long at 70 MPH. The Tundra and most other pickups in that class require a load leveling hitch with anti sway bars to handle that load.

If you get a flat bed trailer and then add a cradle on top of it, the boat will ride much higher in the air. You will also more than likely not be able to launch from the trailer - you may not want to anyway.

Most states have adopted some pretty stringent rules on what kind've of braking system needs to be used for hauling this heavy of a load. Electric disk brakes are the best solution for the best possible control. Also, when traveling with this load - beware of BRIDGE ABUTTMENTS (that point where the road meets a bridge surface) it causes the truck and trailer to oscillate in the vertical plane.

Also make sure that you tied the rudder down - it will fly off if the bolt locking it on the pintal sheers (don't ask me how I know)
--
Daryl Clark
S/Y Intuition - PSC 31 # 54
Formerly s/y Flicka 433 - Ballo Liscio
S/Y Jackito - Dana 222


gabriel warren
 

Ahoy Holly— My two cents re trailers: I don’t know what the mechanical version of an oxymoron is, but my Triad came to me with the ‘float-off package’ and drum brakes. They very quickly locked up when immersed in salt water. Eventually I expensively converted to all stainless disc brakes. The all stainless part is critical for immersion; not all discs are. I don’t trust electric brakes: over decades I have had enough trouble with trailer lights that I don’t trust the electrical connection to the towing vehicle, especially with that kind of weight. As well, electric brakes are out for salt water dunking. The geometry of drum brakes allows for reverse with surge actuators; not so with discs. For reverse, the actuator piston must be immobilized with a pin. On my brand new actuator for my discs, the pin only went through one side, and cocked; I drilled all the way through to the other side and made a longer pin that can’t get stuck.

For delivery, as I have mentioned in an earlier post, it may not make sense to tow your trailer yourself. It didn’t for me. I used Quality Drive-A-Way in Indiana for two hops: Florida to Rhode Island, and after refit, a year later Rhode Island to Nova Scotia. They have all kinds of insurance, and use transit tags. With registration which means taxes, and insurance for everything, your fuel etc, it may be less costly. 

My  gas F-250 pulls the boat easily as well as another significantly heavier trailer, with no complaints. It gets the same horrible mileage (12 mpg) pulling 10,000# or running empty— go figure. Of utmost criticality when towing is balance: the load should be distributed 60-40, with the 60 on the tongue end. If tongue weight is insufficient the trailer can be all over the road, especially on downhills. 

Good luck. With a good trailer you have the same freedom on land as we do at sea.

Gabriel


On Apr 2, 2022, at 9:46 AM, Liveaboard Life <Noreenlight@...> wrote:

Hi, Holly,

Lots of good suggestions and advice from others. I will share my experience, in hope that it is helpful.

We purchased a Flicka that came with a trailer. The trailer has curved bunk supports under the hull, and a keel support. We took the trailer to a company that works on big rig trailers (the owner also trailers his boats). We were lucky. The trailer needed minor work only. Tires, bearings, brakes were all in good order. We replaced the spare (it was not a trailer tire). We removed surface rust, painted with Ospho, where needed, then paint, and added reflective tape. Replaced lights. Replaced carpet on bunks and keel plank. Replaced the battery.

Last October, we towed our Flicka from Olympia, WA to San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico. 2,000 miles plus. Some freeway miles, some smaller roads including short hills but steeper grades than you find on freeways.

We towed her with our 2013 F150 ecoboost pickup. The truck has the trailer package and bags to aid suspension. We also had our pop-up camper on the truck so that added some weight. 

All packaged up, we were about 8' wide (legal limit), just under 13' high, and about 7,000 pounds on the trailer. I've forgotten what the trailer overall length is.

Recommendations:

Buy a new trailer, if possible. Or, buy a trailer that has not been in salt water.

Use a half-ton truck or larger to tow it. 

If you haven't towed a trailer before, get someone with experience to help you with some practice before you tow from OR to WA. Or, better yet, get someone with a truck and towing experience to tow it for you.

If you tow her to Puget Sound, I highly recommend Swantown Marina in Olympia, WA as a launch point. You can get a launch with the travel lift and keep your trailer out of the salt water. They have reasonable slip rates and storage rates. (We live aboard there, on our other boat.)

Have fun with your Flicka! Hope to see you on the water!
Noreen Light
SV Sweethaven
1983 PCS Flicka 20
SV Soundhaven 
1990 Island Packet 32



k b
 

On Friday, April 1, 2022, 4:14 PM, Hollie Butler <sail@...> wrote:

I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)Inline image

Holly,

Regarding my other comments about trailers, this is the one I had manufactured for Agave (our Flicka on the trailer) by a competent welding shop up where the boat is kept in the Michigan UP (Marquette).  Less the jacks (I had the things with the light blue parts holding the boat in place) I spent a little less than 1/2 the price quoted for a Triad trailer).  We used high strength steel to keep the cost and weight down.  This trailer is not equipped with the sort of brake systems required if launching in salt water, an extra cost you probably need unless you launch with a travel lift. This design does work fine in fresh water.  Price included powder coating the trailer.

One of the other comments in response to your inquiry mentioned that driving the tow vehicle for such a load requires experience and/or training.  That is really good advice.

Ken


ED SEITZ
 

She be yar spend the money if you intend to use it get a train trailer but don’t launch it have it lifted off


On Apr 2, 2022, at 4:25 PM, k b via groups.io <mndkb@...> wrote:


To Holly Butler

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Friday, April 1, 2022, 4:14 PM, Hollie Butler <sail@...> wrote:

I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)Inline image

Holly,

Regarding my other comments about trailers, this is the one I had manufactured for Agave (our Flicka on the trailer) by a competent welding shop up where the boat is kept in the Michigan UP (Marquette).  Less the jacks (I had the things with the light blue parts holding the boat in place) I spent a little less than 1/2 the price quoted for a Triad trailer).  We used high strength steel to keep the cost and weight down.  This trailer is not equipped with the sort of brake systems required if launching in salt water, an extra cost you probably need unless you launch with a travel lift. This design does work fine in fresh water.  Price included powder coating the trailer.

One of the other comments in response to your inquiry mentioned that driving the tow vehicle for such a load requires experience and/or training.  That is really good advice.

Ken


burche52@...
 

Daryl Clark, How did you tie the rudder down?  I'm getting ready to haul the Flicka I just purchased on its trailer.  


Mike
 

I bought my Flicka in 1981 new without a trailer.  I ordered a new trailer from Trailrite in about 1995.  They had the spec's to make one for a Flicka and built me a nice trailer.  however they built it with the wheels too far aft so the tongue weight was excessive.  After contacting them they asked to see the boat on the trailer and got everything perfect in a day.  You might ask them for a quote.

Mike Ross 

On Fri, Apr 1, 2022 at 4:14 PM Hollie Butler <sail@...> wrote:
I have a 1979 Flicka that I need to get a trailer for. Up until now it's been living the river life, moored at a dock all year, but soon it will be in a lake for a few months and then in the boatyard for the rest of the year. I'd like a good trailer that will hold it safely both for transport of a few hundred miles (if I drive it from Oregon to Puget Sound) but also while it rests for the winter. 

One person, who runs a respected boat yard, has told me I can buy any trailer that will work with the weight of a Flicka, and then he and his team can fix the trailer up to fit the Flicka. If I went with a used trailer, he estimates this to be around 2k, maybe 3k. Is this a viable option? I called other trailer places today and 3k seems very low.

What are my options here? I called Triad and they would charge over 8k for a trailer I have no way of getting here. He was very friendly and said that a power-boat trailer set-up for the Flicka might work, but I'm likely looking at at least 4k-5k. It's difficult when I'm getting so many different estimates.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! :) 

Thanks! 

Hollie
s/v elska
(instagram: @flickasailor)


Mike
 

I left the rudder loose when trailering.  I tied the tiller off to the stern cleats when launching to protect the rudder.  

On Sat, Jun 25, 2022 at 9:44 PM <burche52@...> wrote:
Daryl Clark, How did you tie the rudder down?  I'm getting ready to haul the Flicka I just purchased on its trailer.  


Scott
 

Trail-Rite is long out of business.  Triad has done Flicka trailers, and in my opinion, builds a better trailer.


On Jun 26, 2022, at 11:46 AM, Mike <m718081@...> wrote:

I bought my Flicka in 1981 new without a trailer.  I ordered a new trailer from Trailrite in about 1995.  They had the spec's to make one for a Flicka and built me a nice trailer.  however they built it with the wheels too far aft so the tongue weight was excessive.  After contacting them they asked to see the boat on the trailer and got everything perfect in a day.  You might ask them for a quote.

Mike Ross