Flicka for Sale


k b
 

1989 Pacific Seacraft Flicka 20, Hull #387 (PCS20387D989).  Salty blue water cruiser with full keel, standing headroom, auxiliary power - new custom built trailer included. Excellent condition with many improvements including Featherstream folding prop, new 3Di NorDac sails, new head, Lifeline AGM batteries, and much more.  In storage at K I Sawyer Airport, Marquette, MI, ready to be towed to a new home. For additional information please contact Chad at (Chad.Lewisboatshop@...) 906-250-0736) or Ken (kenblood2@...) 602-751-3801. $37,800





Priscilla Wheatley
 

Oh my, I can buy her back!!!

This is Cadenza who was mine for 10 years cruising the Maine Coast single-handed.  My dinghy Coda surfed on the front of the second wave in the wake.    The hull was popped in 1989 but she was a 1990 model according to the factory.  The blue on the hull was very dark and looked black when the light was right.  You used to be able to get small containers of gel coat from the factory.  The color numbers were on the boat's paperwork, so they matched.   

My "Decade" adventure when I turned 50 in 1998 was 6 weeks from my home port, South Bristol ME, an hour or from Portland ME.  I headed for Passamaquoddy Bay, Campobello (FDRs Summer house) and Grand Manan island. Spent a couple of days in St Andrew's NB and various gunkholes in New Brunswick and Maine.  It was over 300 miles one-way in sort of a straight line.  There were 20-foot tides, 6kt+ currents under the bridge to Campobello, and one huge whirlpool that you had cross at slack tide to avoid risk of capsizing.  It took 2 tide tables - Maine and New Brunswick are in different time zones.   Fortunately, there is (or maybe was) a very good cruising guide for the Canadian waters.  Pair that up with the "bible," A Cruising Guide to the Maine Coast and you have the detail you need to plan a day's sail.  I spent 3 days on Grand Manan, an island 7 miles off the US coast.  It is in Canada, the result of a land grant.  The international border runs down the middle of the Channel.  I could see Nova Scotia from the top of the cliff on the northern end of Grand Maman.  Swallowtail lighthouse is attached to the land with cables.   That's as close as I got to Nova Scotia.  The harbormaster helped me several times.  I was a 20' sailboat tied up in the midst of their fishing fleet.  He told me when I was leaving that the fishermen he was talking with pointed at us and said "that's one rugged bitch."  He didn't know if they meant the boat, me or both of us.  I vote for the latter.  A lot of my friends do also.

I prefer sailing to working on the boat.  Insurance runs from 5/1-11/1 so that is when I sailed.  Weekends in April were for painting the bottom (antifouling) and getting ready to launch.  Nobody added much back then.  I installed radar and a Profurl for the jib. This trip was during hurricane season so I took a 2nd anchor and rode,  Also a supply larger flares.  It was a great trip!  Trip of a lifetime!   Maine is a wonderful coast to explore.  There is quite a bit of local knowledge to pay attention to.  For example, you can jump overboard to swim in comfortable water if you in anchor in a 20-foot mud bottom with no current.  The water goes up and down so it warms up over the summer.   

I can't wait to see Cadenza's next stop.  She went to Eggemoggin Reach, home of WoodenBoat Magazine, when I sold her.  I know she has been in fresh water for years.  I think deep inside she misses the saltwater, huge tides and strong currents..        


Laurence Holden
 

Oh, such a beautiful post! 

Laurence Holden
Info on my art: Drawing From Our Own True Nature:


k b
 

She's up in storage at the airport in Marquette, MI.  I bought her from the prior owner in Traverse City, MI in 1986 and sailed her in local waters near Marquette on Lake Superior. I'm near you age and no longer consider myself to be up to sailing alone on the big lake.

Lots of things have been done to her since you last sailed her. The last owner, an electrical engineer, converted all the lighting to LED's and installed shore power.  You can see some of what we have done since then in the attachment, an info sheet I've started to help explain the current condition of the boat.

Regards,

Ken

On Friday, May 27, 2022, 02:01:29 PM MDT, Priscilla Wheatley <wheatleyp@...> wrote:


Oh my, I can buy her back!!!

This is Cadenza who was mine for 10 years cruising the Maine Coast single-handed.  My dinghy Coda surfed on the front of the second wave in the wake.    The hull was popped in 1989 but she was a 1990 model according to the factory.  The blue on the hull was very dark and looked black when the light was right.  You used to be able to get small containers of gel coat from the factory.  The color numbers were on the boat's paperwork, so they matched.   

My "Decade" adventure when I turned 50 in 1998 was 6 weeks from my home port, South Bristol ME, an hour or from Portland ME.  I headed for Passamaquoddy Bay, Campobello (FDRs Summer house) and Grand Manan island. Spent a couple of days in St Andrew's NB and various gunkholes in New Brunswick and Maine.  It was over 300 miles one-way in sort of a straight line.  There were 20-foot tides, 6kt+ currents under the bridge to Campobello, and one huge whirlpool that you had cross at slack tide to avoid risk of capsizing.  It took 2 tide tables - Maine and New Brunswick are in different time zones.   Fortunately, there is (or maybe was) a very good cruising guide for the Canadian waters.  Pair that up with the "bible," A Cruising Guide to the Maine Coast and you have the detail you need to plan a day's sail.  I spent 3 days on Grand Manan, an island 7 miles off the US coast.  It is in Canada, the result of a land grant.  The international border runs down the middle of the Channel.  I could see Nova Scotia from the top of the cliff on the northern end of Grand Maman.  Swallowtail lighthouse is attached to the land with cables.   That's as close as I got to Nova Scotia.  The harbormaster helped me several times.  I was a 20' sailboat tied up in the midst of their fishing fleet.  He told me when I was leaving that the fishermen he was talking with pointed at us and said "that's one rugged bitch."  He didn't know if they meant the boat, me or both of us.  I vote for the latter.  A lot of my friends do also.

I prefer sailing to working on the boat.  Insurance runs from 5/1-11/1 so that is when I sailed.  Weekends in April were for painting the bottom (antifouling) and getting ready to launch.  Nobody added much back then.  I installed radar and a Profurl for the jib. This trip was during hurricane season so I took a 2nd anchor and rode,  Also a supply larger flares.  It was a great trip!  Trip of a lifetime!   Maine is a wonderful coast to explore.  There is quite a bit of local knowledge to pay attention to.  For example, you can jump overboard to swim in comfortable water if you in anchor in a 20-foot mud bottom with no current.  The water goes up and down so it warms up over the summer.   

I can't wait to see Cadenza's next stop.  She went to Eggemoggin Reach, home of WoodenBoat Magazine, when I sold her.  I know she has been in fresh water for years.  I think deep inside she misses the saltwater, huge tides and strong currents..        


Don Chambers
 

I heard she is sold, is that so?


On May 27, 2022, at 7:02 PM, k b via groups.io <mndkb@...> wrote:


She's up in storage at the airport in Marquette, MI.  I bought her from the prior owner in Traverse City, MI in 1986 and sailed her in local waters near Marquette on Lake Superior. I'm near you age and no longer consider myself to be up to sailing alone on the big lake.

Lots of things have been done to her since you last sailed her. The last owner, an electrical engineer, converted all the lighting to LED's and installed shore power.  You can see some of what we have done since then in the attachment, an info sheet I've started to help explain the current condition of the boat.

Regards,

Ken

On Friday, May 27, 2022, 02:01:29 PM MDT, Priscilla Wheatley <wheatleyp@...> wrote:


Oh my, I can buy her back!!!

This is Cadenza who was mine for 10 years cruising the Maine Coast single-handed.  My dinghy Coda surfed on the front of the second wave in the wake.    The hull was popped in 1989 but she was a 1990 model according to the factory.  The blue on the hull was very dark and looked black when the light was right.  You used to be able to get small containers of gel coat from the factory.  The color numbers were on the boat's paperwork, so they matched.   

My "Decade" adventure when I turned 50 in 1998 was 6 weeks from my home port, South Bristol ME, an hour or from Portland ME.  I headed for Passamaquoddy Bay, Campobello (FDRs Summer house) and Grand Manan island. Spent a couple of days in St Andrew's NB and various gunkholes in New Brunswick and Maine.  It was over 300 miles one-way in sort of a straight line.  There were 20-foot tides, 6kt+ currents under the bridge to Campobello, and one huge whirlpool that you had cross at slack tide to avoid risk of capsizing.  It took 2 tide tables - Maine and New Brunswick are in different time zones.   Fortunately, there is (or maybe was) a very good cruising guide for the Canadian waters.  Pair that up with the "bible," A Cruising Guide to the Maine Coast and you have the detail you need to plan a day's sail.  I spent 3 days on Grand Manan, an island 7 miles off the US coast.  It is in Canada, the result of a land grant.  The international border runs down the middle of the Channel.  I could see Nova Scotia from the top of the cliff on the northern end of Grand Maman.  Swallowtail lighthouse is attached to the land with cables.   That's as close as I got to Nova Scotia.  The harbormaster helped me several times.  I was a 20' sailboat tied up in the midst of their fishing fleet.  He told me when I was leaving that the fishermen he was talking with pointed at us and said "that's one rugged bitch."  He didn't know if they meant the boat, me or both of us.  I vote for the latter.  A lot of my friends do also.

I prefer sailing to working on the boat.  Insurance runs from 5/1-11/1 so that is when I sailed.  Weekends in April were for painting the bottom (antifouling) and getting ready to launch.  Nobody added much back then.  I installed radar and a Profurl for the jib. This trip was during hurricane season so I took a 2nd anchor and rode,  Also a supply larger flares.  It was a great trip!  Trip of a lifetime!   Maine is a wonderful coast to explore.  There is quite a bit of local knowledge to pay attention to.  For example, you can jump overboard to swim in comfortable water if you in anchor in a 20-foot mud bottom with no current.  The water goes up and down so it warms up over the summer.   

I can't wait to see Cadenza's next stop.  She went to Eggemoggin Reach, home of WoodenBoat Magazine, when I sold her.  I know she has been in fresh water for years.  I think deep inside she misses the saltwater, huge tides and strong currents..        


k b
 

Don,
Not yet. Agave is for sale.
Regards,
Ken


On Sat, May 28, 2022 at 4:34 AM, Don Chambers
<dchambers@...> wrote:
I heard she is sold, is that so?


On May 27, 2022, at 7:02 PM, k b via groups.io <mndkb@...> wrote:


She's up in storage at the airport in Marquette, MI.  I bought her from the prior owner in Traverse City, MI in 1986 and sailed her in local waters near Marquette on Lake Superior. I'm near you age and no longer consider myself to be up to sailing alone on the big lake.

Lots of things have been done to her since you last sailed her. The last owner, an electrical engineer, converted all the lighting to LED's and installed shore power.  You can see some of what we have done since then in the attachment, an info sheet I've started to help explain the current condition of the boat.

Regards,

Ken

On Friday, May 27, 2022, 02:01:29 PM MDT, Priscilla Wheatley <wheatleyp@...> wrote:


Oh my, I can buy her back!!!

This is Cadenza who was mine for 10 years cruising the Maine Coast single-handed.  My dinghy Coda surfed on the front of the second wave in the wake.    The hull was popped in 1989 but she was a 1990 model according to the factory.  The blue on the hull was very dark and looked black when the light was right.  You used to be able to get small containers of gel coat from the factory.  The color numbers were on the boat's paperwork, so they matched.   

My "Decade" adventure when I turned 50 in 1998 was 6 weeks from my home port, South Bristol ME, an hour or from Portland ME.  I headed for Passamaquoddy Bay, Campobello (FDRs Summer house) and Grand Manan island. Spent a couple of days in St Andrew's NB and various gunkholes in New Brunswick and Maine.  It was over 300 miles one-way in sort of a straight line.  There were 20-foot tides, 6kt+ currents under the bridge to Campobello, and one huge whirlpool that you had cross at slack tide to avoid risk of capsizing.  It took 2 tide tables - Maine and New Brunswick are in different time zones.   Fortunately, there is (or maybe was) a very good cruising guide for the Canadian waters.  Pair that up with the "bible," A Cruising Guide to the Maine Coast and you have the detail you need to plan a day's sail.  I spent 3 days on Grand Manan, an island 7 miles off the US coast.  It is in Canada, the result of a land grant.  The international border runs down the middle of the Channel.  I could see Nova Scotia from the top of the cliff on the northern end of Grand Maman.  Swallowtail lighthouse is attached to the land with cables.   That's as close as I got to Nova Scotia.  The harbormaster helped me several times.  I was a 20' sailboat tied up in the midst of their fishing fleet.  He told me when I was leaving that the fishermen he was talking with pointed at us and said "that's one rugged bitch."  He didn't know if they meant the boat, me or both of us.  I vote for the latter.  A lot of my friends do also.

I prefer sailing to working on the boat.  Insurance runs from 5/1-11/1 so that is when I sailed.  Weekends in April were for painting the bottom (antifouling) and getting ready to launch.  Nobody added much back then.  I installed radar and a Profurl for the jib. This trip was during hurricane season so I took a 2nd anchor and rode,  Also a supply larger flares.  It was a great trip!  Trip of a lifetime!   Maine is a wonderful coast to explore.  There is quite a bit of local knowledge to pay attention to.  For example, you can jump overboard to swim in comfortable water if you in anchor in a 20-foot mud bottom with no current.  The water goes up and down so it warms up over the summer.   

I can't wait to see Cadenza's next stop.  She went to Eggemoggin Reach, home of WoodenBoat Magazine, when I sold her.  I know she has been in fresh water for years.  I think deep inside she misses the saltwater, huge tides and strong currents..