#intro #intro


Tim Stapleton
 

I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


gabriel warren
 

When Koremikre (#275) came to me, she had no dodger. She also had no sea hood, crucial for both dodger and solar panels. The original Pacific Seacraft is no more of course, but there is a reiteration in North Carolina. They have some of the original molds, including one for Flicka sea hoods. They whacked me $650, but it looks like it belongs there. As far as the dodger height, you can measure the height of the gooseneck and assume level. That being said, the cut of the main can vary, so the boom may be slightly up or down. My boom has an outhaul led to a cleat near the mast; I repurposed it into a topping lift, pretty important. Good luck.

Gabriel

On May 3, 2020, at 7:35 AM, svheron35@... wrote:

I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


GABRIEL WARREN-- SCULPTOR


720 King's Factory Rd
Charlestown
Rhode Island USA 02813
401.364.0087 

7984 Rt. 337
Antigonish Nova Scotia
B2G 2L1 Canada
902.863.5822






Tim Stapleton
 

Thanks Gabriel.  Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.  But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim


Antonio Martinez
 

Are boat is on the hard and spars are still off, so I'm sorry I can't help you.

If anyone happens to have the original Bingham drawings (blueprints), I'd love to overlay them in CAD.  Then perhaps measurements could be taken from drawings?

I too am midway in making of bowsprit.  We should compare notes sometime!
IMG_1534.JPG

a

Middle River Studio


On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 7:35 AM <svheron35@...> wrote:
I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


Antonio Martinez
 

Gabriel, a couple of questions:
Do you have pics of sea hood?
Current contact info for folks in NC?
When you say you repurposed cleat on boom for topping lift, what did you do with the outhaul?
Our outhaul is adjustable at the base of the mast.  I also added a small turning block with lock-off, at end of boom.  That one gets used when boom is over cockpit and quick adjustment is needed.
a

Middle River Studio


On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 8:20 AM gabriel warren <gabriel@...> wrote:
When Koremikre (#275) came to me, she had no dodger. She also had no sea hood, crucial for both dodger and solar panels. The original Pacific Seacraft is no more of course, but there is a reiteration in North Carolina. They have some of the original molds, including one for Flicka sea hoods. They whacked me $650, but it looks like it belongs there. As far as the dodger height, you can measure the height of the gooseneck and assume level. That being said, the cut of the main can vary, so the boom may be slightly up or down. My boom has an outhaul led to a cleat near the mast; I repurposed it into a topping lift, pretty important. Good luck.

Gabriel

On May 3, 2020, at 7:35 AM, svheron35@... wrote:

I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


GABRIEL WARREN-- SCULPTOR


720 King's Factory Rd
Charlestown
Rhode Island USA 02813
401.364.0087 

7984 Rt. 337
Antigonish Nova Scotia
B2G 2L1 Canada
902.863.5822






Antonio Martinez
 

This is just brochure image imported into CAD and scaled.  Most of the measurements are pretty close.  But I don't know where cockpit sole is.  Does anyone have a section drawing?
image.png

a
s/v Miracle
#165 1980



On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 8:41 AM <svheron35@...> wrote:
Thanks Gabriel.  Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.  But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim


Matt Corwin
 

Hi, My boat is in Wiscasset, so about 12 miles from Boothbay if you would like to do any comparisons...

I am going to be building a mast raising devise so I should have the rig set up here at home in the next couple weeks.

Hardwoods are much preferable to fir for the Flicka bowsprit, the original on my boat looks like it

is ash (and 42 years old) but sapele mahogany or teak are also good choices but if I were to remake it, I would use teak.
Here at the shop I can show you bowsprits from a Bristol Channel Cutter that are vertical grain douglas fir, one old (and rotted) and one new, so you can see that it is not that I do not understand the application of the material, functionally, it is that there is no compression step for the sprit to seat against so all the force is on the bolts and so the wood has to be hard enough to resist crushing and splitting at the bolts ( and the resulting rot). Secondly, the weight of the little sprit is not an issue, it is small and does not project far from the bow but it does need to be strong and also rot resistant because it is in full contact with the deck. Fir is not rot resistant enough.  On the BCC the sprit is not touching the deck and there are no bolts, there is an ash fid through a mortise that sets into the sampson posts while Flicka has no means of supporting the bowsprit, it's just bolted to the deck. They knew what they were doing at PSC when they chose hardwoods for the sprit,
. Some folks have suggested white oak because of its rot resistance and strength and I agree that it would be an excellent choice for those reasons but it does not hold a finish very well  outdoors and I don't trust of the interface between the white oak and 5200 or other caulks over the long haul because of the way it likes to shake off coatings...

Matt

Pacific Seacraft, Flicka #11  'Caper'

Sam Morse Boatyard,  BCC 28 #21,  'Fiddler's Green'


IMG_3436.jpg
cutting the tapers on an 11ft douglas fir sprit



-----Original Message-----
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Sent: Sun, May 3, 2020 7:35 am
Subject: [Flicka20] #intro

I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


gabriel warren
 

Greetings Antonio— You asked a few questions. I’ll try:

— Pictures of hood. My boat is 800 miles from here, so I can’t nip over and shoot images. But it is from the original mold, and looks like every other one. I’m sure you can find imagery online.

— Contact for Pacific Seacraft North Carolina. You can easily find this with google. I just verified this.

— Outhaul. I wasn’t clear. The outhaul in internal in the boom. It emerges about 18” from the gooseneck, and is line. Somewhere in the boom it turns into a small wire, which runs over a sheave at the boom end. It was intended to be shackled to the main clew. I fitted a wire from the masthead that is shackled to this wire, so it functions as a topping lift. I just lash the clew to a shackle on the boom end. Nobody is going to race a Flicka, so I don’t need to adjust the outhaul underway.

Gabriel

On May 3, 2020, at 8:41 AM, svheron35@... wrote

Thanks Gabriel.  Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.  But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim



Matt Corwin
 

If anyone is going to order a sea hood I would also like to get in on it, perhaps there will be some discount for a quantity?



-----Original Message-----
From: gabriel warren <gabriel@...>
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Sent: Sun, May 3, 2020 9:33 am
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] #intro

Greetings Antonio— You asked a few questions. I’ll try:

— Pictures of hood. My boat is 800 miles from here, so I can’t nip over and shoot images. But it is from the original mold, and looks like every other one. I’m sure you can find imagery online.

— Contact for Pacific Seacraft North Carolina. You can easily find this with google. I just verified this.

— Outhaul. I wasn’t clear. The outhaul in internal in the boom. It emerges about 18” from the gooseneck, and is line. Somewhere in the boom it turns into a small wire, which runs over a sheave at the boom end. It was intended to be shackled to the main clew. I fitted a wire from the masthead that is shackled to this wire, so it functions as a topping lift. I just lash the clew to a shackle on the boom end. Nobody is going to race a Flicka, so I don’t need to adjust the outhaul underway.

Gabriel

On May 3, 2020, at 8:41 AM, svheron35@... wrote

Thanks Gabriel.  Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.  But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim



Antonio Martinez
 

I tried to contact folks a while back - in NC - and got no response.
I would be interested if anyone manages to make progress.  I'll poke around as well, and try to find out if still avail etc.

a

Middle River Studio


On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 9:36 AM Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
If anyone is going to order a sea hood I would also like to get in on it, perhaps there will be some discount for a quantity?



-----Original Message-----
From: gabriel warren <gabriel@...>
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Sent: Sun, May 3, 2020 9:33 am
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] #intro

Greetings Antonio— You asked a few questions. I’ll try:

— Pictures of hood. My boat is 800 miles from here, so I can’t nip over and shoot images. But it is from the original mold, and looks like every other one. I’m sure you can find imagery online.

— Contact for Pacific Seacraft North Carolina. You can easily find this with google. I just verified this.

— Outhaul. I wasn’t clear. The outhaul in internal in the boom. It emerges about 18” from the gooseneck, and is line. Somewhere in the boom it turns into a small wire, which runs over a sheave at the boom end. It was intended to be shackled to the main clew. I fitted a wire from the masthead that is shackled to this wire, so it functions as a topping lift. I just lash the clew to a shackle on the boom end. Nobody is going to race a Flicka, so I don’t need to adjust the outhaul underway.

Gabriel

On May 3, 2020, at 8:41 AM, svheron35@... wrote

Thanks Gabriel.  Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.  But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim



Jay Cushman
 

The March 2014 issue of Flicka Friends has an article on sea hoods. Jay


S/V REDUX. #156
Harborside, ME





--
SV REDUX
#156
Swan’s Island, ME


stoked Forsure
 

I some plans of the original BB kit flicka. 24 sheets.

Douglas Hammond 

On May 3, 2020, at 6:16 AM, Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...> wrote:


This is just brochure image imported into CAD and scaled.  Most of the measurements are pretty close.  But I don't know where cockpit sole is.  Does anyone have a section drawing?
<image.png>


a
s/v Miracle
#165 1980



On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 8:41 AM <svheron35@...> wrote:
Thanks Gabriel.  Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.  But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim


Tom Davison
 

The Bingham Plans may be different form the Pacific Seacraft Flicka. Bill Luther of Pacific Seacraft did the interior and deck. 

The cabin sole is only a few inches above the waterline based on viewing the water in the cockpit drains at the dock. 



On May 3, 2020, at 11:30 AM, stoked Forsure via groups.io <hdmechanic2003@...> wrote:

I some plans of the original BB kit flicka. 24 sheets.

Douglas Hammond 

On May 3, 2020, at 6:16 AM, Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...> wrote:


This is just brochure image imported into CAD and scaled.  Most of the measurements are pretty close.  But I don't know where cockpit sole is.  Does anyone have a section drawing?
<image.png>


a
s/v Miracle
#165 1980



On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 8:41 AM <svheron35@...> wrote:
Thanks Gabriel.  Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.  But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim




Ernie Vitucci
 

On 5/3/20, Tom Davison <sail2018@syblueskies.com> wrote:
The Bingham Plans may be different form the Pacific Seacraft Flicka. Bill
Luther of Pacific Seacraft did the interior and deck.

The cabin sole is only a few inches above the waterline based on viewing the
water in the cockpit drains at the dock.



On May 3, 2020, at 11:30 AM, stoked Forsure via groups.io
<hdmechanic2003=yahoo.ca@groups.io> wrote:

I some plans of the original BB kit flicka. 24 sheets.

Douglas Hammond

On May 3, 2020, at 6:16 AM, Antonio Martinez
<middleriverstudio@gmail.com> wrote:


This is just brochure image imported into CAD and scaled. Most of the
measurements are pretty close. But I don't know where cockpit sole is.
Does anyone have a section drawing?
<image.png>


a
s/v Miracle
#165 1980



On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 8:41 AM <svheron35@gmail.com
<mailto:svheron35@gmail.com>> wrote:
Thanks Gabriel. Measuring from the gooseneck was my fall back position.
But I was also hoping to get a measurement from the cockpit sole in hopes
that the 2 numbers lined up.

Tim





Morris London
 

I was down at the boat this morning, and fortunately read the email before going.  I took some measurements on my boat, #242 a 1983 model.  The following conditions apply, so your mileage may vary:

  1.  I have added a hinge under the mast tabernacle, and this raised the entire rig.  The hinge itself is about 1 1/8 inch in height.  However, there is a depression in the deck in the area of the tabernacle, and the hinge spans over this depression, so the effect is probably closer to 1 1/4 or 1 3/8 inch.  I have noted this same depression in photos of other boats, so I think it's in the mold, not just my boat.  If you don't have a hinge, your measurements should be less by 1 1/4 to 1 3/8 inch.
  2. My mast is raked at the 1 3/4 degrees (~10" aft at the mast head) specified on the drawings from '82 that I got with the boat.  If your rake is different the angle will change the height a bit.  An inch additional rake at the masthead would imply about 3/8 inch less clearance at the boom end.
  3. I adjusted the boom to be perpendicular to the mast (not necessarily level to the cabin or cockpit soles).
  4. My boat's deck mold does not have the integral engine hatch.  At the time my and your boats were built what they did for inboard engine installations was cut a large hole in the sole over the engine and install another fiberglass assembly with the engine hatch in it on top of the sole.  The assembly was fastened to the sole with numerous bolts all the way around the cockpit just inboard of the drainage grooves.  If you have an inboard engine you have the additional assembly.  This will add some height to the cockpit sole and thus reduce the measurement to the boom, but I don't know by how much.  If you have the assembly you should be able to remove the engine access hatch and possibly see the cut edge of the deck mold sole.  You could then measure the difference due to the added assembly.  If you have an outboard, as I do, your deck will be the same as mine.
  5. I have Kenyan spars, and they match the drawings.  The most important measurement for comparison to measurements you take of your spars is that the CL of the boom and its gooseneck fitting on the mast are 17 inches from the bottom the mast.
  6. My boat has the teak and holly sole in the cabin. This adds an additional 1/4" to the cabin sole and applies to a second measurement I give you below.
With all that in mind,  I measured the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom, at the aft end of the spar extrusion (not the endcap with the sheaves in it), to be 55 3/8 inches.  This does not include the bale for the main sheet tackle.  The point is just forward of the outboard engine fuel tank locker, if you have one of those.

Because you're looking at a dodger, a useful measurement might also be further forward in the area of the hatch.  I measured from the cabin sole to the bottom of the boom just aft of the outhaul cleat (~45 inches aft of the mast), which was pretty close to the main hatch in its fully open location, to be 86 7/8 inches.  If you don't have the teak and holly sole (most do but there are plenty out there without) your measurement would be 1/4" greater (after correcting for the hinge!).  Speaking of outhaul cleat, don't forget it protrudes below the boom another 1 inch, and depending on your dodger design may be over the dodger when the boom is in over the boat.

That's a whole lot of verbiage to deliver a couple measurements (only one that you actually asked for), and the precision of the measurements is ridiculously tight.  But, fitting a dodger or bimini to such a small boat can get down to measurements of less than an inch.

Unfortunately the sails are not on the boat right now.  If they had been I'd have taken measurements with the main raised, since that's what will determine the actual location of the boom underway.

Hope this helps.

Morris London
"Golden Crown"


From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> on behalf of svheron35@... <svheron35@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 3, 2020 7:35 AM
To: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] #intro
 
I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


Antonio Martinez
 

Your comment about the depression in the tabernacle is VERY interesting and if true (it was the mold), encouraging as I assumed it was 40 years of compressive forces on ours.  That concavity and the failing sealant on 4 mast step screws, was causing an occasional water intrusion issue.  I just recently  sanded the gelcoat off in that area, and added cloth/resin to get it level.

a

s/v Miracle


On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 1:58 PM Morris London <morris_london@...> wrote:
I was down at the boat this morning, and fortunately read the email before going.  I took some measurements on my boat, #242 a 1983 model.  The following conditions apply, so your mileage may vary:

  1.  I have added a hinge under the mast tabernacle, and this raised the entire rig.  The hinge itself is about 1 1/8 inch in height.  However, there is a depression in the deck in the area of the tabernacle, and the hinge spans over this depression, so the effect is probably closer to 1 1/4 or 1 3/8 inch.  I have noted this same depression in photos of other boats, so I think it's in the mold, not just my boat.  If you don't have a hinge, your measurements should be less by 1 1/4 to 1 3/8 inch.
  2. My mast is raked at the 1 3/4 degrees (~10" aft at the mast head) specified on the drawings from '82 that I got with the boat.  If your rake is different the angle will change the height a bit.  An inch additional rake at the masthead would imply about 3/8 inch less clearance at the boom end.
  3. I adjusted the boom to be perpendicular to the mast (not necessarily level to the cabin or cockpit soles).
  4. My boat's deck mold does not have the integral engine hatch.  At the time my and your boats were built what they did for inboard engine installations was cut a large hole in the sole over the engine and install another fiberglass assembly with the engine hatch in it on top of the sole.  The assembly was fastened to the sole with numerous bolts all the way around the cockpit just inboard of the drainage grooves.  If you have an inboard engine you have the additional assembly.  This will add some height to the cockpit sole and thus reduce the measurement to the boom, but I don't know by how much.  If you have the assembly you should be able to remove the engine access hatch and possibly see the cut edge of the deck mold sole.  You could then measure the difference due to the added assembly.  If you have an outboard, as I do, your deck will be the same as mine.
  5. I have Kenyan spars, and they match the drawings.  The most important measurement for comparison to measurements you take of your spars is that the CL of the boom and its gooseneck fitting on the mast are 17 inches from the bottom the mast.
  6. My boat has the teak and holly sole in the cabin. This adds an additional 1/4" to the cabin sole and applies to a second measurement I give you below.
With all that in mind,  I measured the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom, at the aft end of the spar extrusion (not the endcap with the sheaves in it), to be 55 3/8 inches.  This does not include the bale for the main sheet tackle.  The point is just forward of the outboard engine fuel tank locker, if you have one of those.

Because you're looking at a dodger, a useful measurement might also be further forward in the area of the hatch.  I measured from the cabin sole to the bottom of the boom just aft of the outhaul cleat (~45 inches aft of the mast), which was pretty close to the main hatch in its fully open location, to be 86 7/8 inches.  If you don't have the teak and holly sole (most do but there are plenty out there without) your measurement would be 1/4" greater (after correcting for the hinge!).  Speaking of outhaul cleat, don't forget it protrudes below the boom another 1 inch, and depending on your dodger design may be over the dodger when the boom is in over the boat.

That's a whole lot of verbiage to deliver a couple measurements (only one that you actually asked for), and the precision of the measurements is ridiculously tight.  But, fitting a dodger or bimini to such a small boat can get down to measurements of less than an inch.

Unfortunately the sails are not on the boat right now.  If they had been I'd have taken measurements with the main raised, since that's what will determine the actual location of the boom underway.

Hope this helps.

Morris London
"Golden Crown"

From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> on behalf of svheron35@... <svheron35@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 3, 2020 7:35 AM
To: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] #intro
 
I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


Tom Davison
 

The next issue of Flicka Friends (May 15) will have an article about the replacement of the 
wooden mast support arch on a Flicka 20 and reinforcement of the tabernacle.

It would be interesting to develop some measurements for the Pacific Seacraft Flicka 20 
(using the forward hatch removed) to see the height of the tabernacle from a specific location
on the cabin floor or on the liner somewhere. 

Given the age of the Flicka 20 class and the installation of the tabernacle, this measurement 
might be the first step. 

The screws into the deck trough the tabernacle and the mast wiring holes may well be the 
reason for the water intrusion.

The photos of the repair in the article should be helpful. 

How much deflection is too much?  Good question.






On May 3, 2020, at 2:48 PM, Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...> wrote:

Your comment about the depression in the tabernacle is VERY interesting and if true (it was the mold), encouraging as I assumed it was 40 years of compressive forces on ours.  That concavity and the failing sealant on 4 mast step screws, was causing an occasional water intrusion issue.  I just recently  sanded the gelcoat off in that area, and added cloth/resin to get it level. 

a

s/v Miracle


On Sun, May 3, 2020 at 1:58 PM Morris London <morris_london@...> wrote:
I was down at the boat this morning, and fortunately read the email before going.  I took some measurements on my boat, #242 a 1983 model.  The following conditions apply, so your mileage may vary:

  1.  I have added a hinge under the mast tabernacle, and this raised the entire rig.  The hinge itself is about 1 1/8 inch in height.  However, there is a depression in the deck in the area of the tabernacle, and the hinge spans over this depression, so the effect is probably closer to 11/4 or 1 3/8 inch.  I have noted this same depression in photos of other boats, so I think it's in the mold, not just my boat.  If you don't have a hinge, your measurements should be less by 1 1/4 to 1 3/8 inch.
  2. My mast is raked at the 1 3/4 degrees (~10" aft at the mast head) specified on the drawings from '82 that I got with the boat.  If your rake is different the angle will change the height a bit.  An inch additional rake at the masthead would imply about 3/8 inch less clearance at the boom end.
  3. I adjusted the boom to be perpendicular to the mast (not necessarily level to the cabin or cockpit soles).
  4. My boat's deck mold does not have the integral engine hatch.  At the time my and your boats were built what they did for inboard engine installations was cut a large hole in the sole over the engine and install another fiberglass assembly with the engine hatch in it on top of the sole.  The assembly was fastened to the sole with numerous bolts all the way around the cockpit just inboard of the drainage grooves.  If you have an inboard engine you have the additional assembly.  This will add some height to the cockpit sole and thus reduce the measurement to the boom, but I don't know by how much.  If you have the assembly you should be able to remove the engine access hatch and possibly see the cut edge of the deck mold sole.  You could then measure the difference due to the added assembly.  If you have an outboard, as I do, your deck will be the same as mine.
  5. I have Kenyan spars, and they match the drawings.  The most important measurement for comparison to measurements you take of your spars is that the CL of the boom and its gooseneck fitting on the mast are 17 inches from the bottom the mast.
  6. My boat has the teak and holly sole in the cabin. This adds an additional 1/4" to the cabin sole and applies to a second measurement I give you below.
With all that in mind,  I measured the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom, at the aft end of the spar extrusion (not the endcap with the sheaves in it), to be 55 3/8 inches.  This does not include the bale for the main sheet tackle.  The point is just forward of the outboard engine fuel tank locker, if you have one of those.

Because you're looking at a dodger, a useful measurement might also be further forward in the area of the hatch.  I measured from the cabin sole to the bottom of the boom just aft of the outhaul cleat (~45 inches aft of the mast), which was pretty close to the main hatch in its fully open location, to be 86 7/8inches.  If you don't have the teak and holly sole (most do but there are plenty out there without) your measurement would be 1/4" greater (after correcting for the hinge!).  Speaking of outhaul cleat, don't forget it protrudes below the boom another 1 inch, and depending on your dodger design may be over the dodger when the boom is in over the boat.

That's a whole lot of verbiage to deliver a couple measurements (only one that you actually asked for), and the precision of the measurements is ridiculously tight.  But, fitting a dodger or bimini to such a small boat can get down to measurements of less than an inch.

Unfortunately the sails are not on the boat right now.  If they had been I'd have taken measurements with the main raised, since that's what will determine the actual location of the boom underway.

Hope this helps.

Morris London
"Golden Crown"

From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> on behalf of svheron35@... <svheron35@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 3, 2020 7:35 AM
To: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] #intro
 
I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.




Jim Hooker
 

On ours, with the boom parallel to the cockpit sole there is 64” under the boom. It may ride an inch or so higher with the sail up.

Jim Hooker
sv Niamh, #278
Detroit

On May 3, 2020, at 8:20 AM, gabriel warren <gabriel@...> wrote:

When Koremikre (#275) came to me, she had no dodger. She also had no sea hood, crucial for both dodger and solar panels. The original Pacific Seacraft is no more of course, but there is a reiteration in North Carolina. They have some of the original molds, including one for Flicka sea hoods. They whacked me $650, but it looks like it belongs there. As far as the dodger height, you can measure the height of the gooseneck and assume level. That being said, the cut of the main can vary, so the boom may be slightly up or down. My boom has an outhaul led to a cleat near the mast; I repurposed it into a topping lift, pretty important. Good luck.

Gabriel

On May 3, 2020, at 7:35 AM, svheron35@... wrote:

I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


GABRIEL WARREN-- SCULPTOR


720 King's Factory Rd
Charlestown
Rhode Island USA 02813
401.364.0087 

7984 Rt. 337
Antigonish Nova Scotia
B2G 2L1 Canada
902.863.5822






Priscilla Wheatley
 

Congratulations on your Flicka!  You are following in our wake, so to speak.  I bought Cadenza, #387, from Mike Mitchell in Christmas Cove in 1990. I tied up there for a few years but moved up to the Gamage shipyard through my last season sailing, 1999. 

A few years ago a friend was headed for Boothbay and asked me to join her.  We are both into horses now, but she knew about part of my yachting life. That's the only time I saw Boothbay from the land.  It's much better on the water.  I watched the July 4 fireworks a few times.  They are a lot of fun at anchor.  I was there one year aboard Ladona (as she is known now) for Schooner Days and a thunderstorm came through. The lightening stuck the shortest mast in the harbor on a J-24.  My friend and I headed for South Bristol.  The shipyard is quite different.  We went down to Christmas Cove and I had forgotten how stunningly beautiful it is.  All of the Coveside buildings are gone except the restaurant and bar.  I have an aerial view postcard Mike had made up with Cadenza right up front.  I have something hanging from the ceiling in the bar but I don't have a clue what it is. Walter Cronkite came in whenever he stopped at the Cove on a cruise.  The one distinct memory I have is sitting at a table with one of the Coveside guys and Walter was standing right next to me waiting for someone.  II also remember one really quiet day late in the season when there were 3 or 4 boats on the river when Washburn and Doughty launched a new boat about the size of a tug.  We all got our airhorns out and saluted them which they enjoyed, a nice surprise.    

Have you done much sailing in the area?  The Damariscotta River is the prettiest in Maine. I spent many a night in Seal Cove which had an osprey nest on top of an old wooden electric tower.  There are enough gunkholes in the area that even if it was a lousy few days weather-wise it didn't take that long to anchor a neat little spot.  There was some unwritten wisdom about never going west of the Kennebec River.  Too many stinkpots and jet skis, nothing to see. The sailing was much better heading down east.  It's easy to cut through the gut and there was a hump in the middle of the bridge so I had to pay attention to the tide.  I usually headed for John's Bay and the Pemaquid light. and into Muscongus bay.

The Pacific Seacraft Rendezvous was at Christmas Cove.  I don't remember what year it started but the last one I did was 1999.  It was a pretty consistent group that got together every year.  The race had 2 classes:  Flickas and everybody else.  We started just outside the harbor, headed out to a buoy off Linekin, then headed up the river.  The finish was near the ledges and then we headed to anchor at the Darling Marine Center for the lobster bake.  Those were the days!!!

I read all sorts of posts here and have to adjust to the fact that Flicka's have been around for a long time now.  I'm glad to see so  many people undertaking projects to bring them to a glorious new era under sail.  Now that I have located Cadenza in the Great Lakes I'm happy she looks so good. I'm not entirely comfortable yet with the idea she is in fresh water with no tides.   


Jim roberts
 

66” on Sea Mouse, psc#5,
Cockpit sole non-opening.


On May 3, 2020, at 1:17 PM, Jim Hooker <jahooker@...> wrote:


On ours, with the boom parallel to the cockpit sole there is 64” under the boom. It may ride an inch or so higher with the sail up.

Jim Hooker
sv Niamh, #278
Detroit

On May 3, 2020, at 8:20 AM, gabriel warren <gabriel@...> wrote:

When Koremikre (#275) came to me, she had no dodger. She also had no sea hood, crucial for both dodger and solar panels. The original Pacific Seacraft is no more of course, but there is a reiteration in North Carolina. They have some of the original molds, including one for Flicka sea hoods. They whacked me $650, but it looks like it belongs there. As far as the dodger height, you can measure the height of the gooseneck and assume level. That being said, the cut of the main can vary, so the boom may be slightly up or down. My boom has an outhaul led to a cleat near the mast; I repurposed it into a topping lift, pretty important. Good luck.

Gabriel

On May 3, 2020, at 7:35 AM, svheron35@... wrote:

I have recently bought hull #162, and will be sailing out of East Boothbay, Maine.  My first job is to replace the bowsprit which had some soft spots.  The old one is off and I am building a new one of douglas fir.  I am sure I will have lots of questions and need for advice along the way.  I will be adding and upgrading some electronics and hope, come fall, to sail her down to the Chesapeake and maybe points south.  Right now I would also like to build a dodger frame for her.  The mast may be down for another 4 to 6 weeks which makes taking measurements for its height doable but difficult.  That is why I was hoping someone might help me out by providing a measurement of the height from the cockpit sole to the bottom of the boom.  It will take me a while to build the frame and then make the dodger and would like to get started pretty soon.  Still chilly here in Maine and a good time to be doing some sewing.  Thanks for any help.
Tim S.


GABRIEL WARREN-- SCULPTOR


720 King's Factory Rd
Charlestown
Rhode Island USA 02813
401.364.0087 

7984 Rt. 337
Antigonish Nova Scotia
B2G 2L1 Canada
902.863.5822