Date   

Re: Nanni diesel engine #advice

Scott
 

Hello Carol,

I DO NOT have a Nanni 2.10 installed in my Flicka, so I cannot speak to actual installation BUT I thought I would share a recent experience regarding Nanni engines for your interest:

I recently came very close to buying a (much) larger boat that had a very low-hour Nanni 4.195HE engine installed.  I was well aware of the Nanni brand, and also knew this particular engine to be a Nanni conversion (‘marinization’) of a Kubota base engine.  As part of my due diligence, I decided to contact the local Nanni dealers to inquire about parts availability and service support.

I learned that there were only two listed authorized Nanni dealers on the entire U.S. West Coast – one in Seattle, and one in Los Angeles area.  I was only able to reach the Seattle dealer, and was informed that they generally did not stock anything beyond very limited service parts like oil or fuel filters (and even then, not for all models).  They said that all other parts could only be obtained via them ordering from the headquarters in France.

Indeed, I did a bit more digging on the internet, and this was corroborated by numerous posts on the various sailing/cruising forums.  Apparently there used to be an active Nanni dealer on the East Coast that did offer somewhat better parts support, but reportedly is now out of business.

I also learned that a majority of ‘base engine’ hard parts could actually be bought direct from Kubota tractor and/or commercial engine dealers (Kubota tractor dealers are nearly ubiquitous in the U.S.).  The real concern, though, is sourcing the parts manufactured by Nanni for the ‘marinization’ equipment, as these are proprietary, and not available from Kubota (or likely elsewhere).  These generally include the heat exchanger, the exhaust mixing elbow, hoses to-from the heat exchanger and block, and in some cases, the raw water pump (I was able to find a compatible model raw water pump from Johnson Pump).

In the case of the engine I was looking at, the exhaust mixing elbow was suspect.  When I inquired about availability and lead-time for order, I was told that it could take as long as 6-10 weeks depending on stock in France.

While I believe the Nanni engines are likely very good, the parts and support in the U.S. seems questionable at best.  I decided that if I did buy the bigger boat, I would budget for replacing the otherwise near-new Nanni with a comparable Beta Marine engine.  Beta, like Nanni, uses Kubota base engines for the majority of their line.  The difference is that Beta has an extensive dealer and support network here in North America (and increasingly, worldwide).  I called my local distributor, and they indicated that most parts are available within short order if not already in stock.

There is one more possible consideration regarding the Nanni.  When I looked up the 2.10 model you referenced, the literature I found does not show emissions certification for the American market (currently ’Tier III’ with rumblings about ’Tier IV’ coming soon).  Engines that do not meet the current emissions standard cannot legally be imported into the U.S.

I do know that there are a number of Flickas out there that have been re-powered successfully with the smallest Beta two-cylinder engines.  I have also seen two Flickas with earlier (also Kubota-based) Westerbeke two-cylinder engines (as I understand, these are no longer available for domestic sale). The Nanni 2.10, while likely based on the same or similar Kubota base engine, might or might not actually fit depending on the actual dimensions and positioning of the heat-exchanger and other proprietary equipment.  I would make sure to verify ALL dimensions as taken directly from the Nanni technical literature.  Also, you would want to make sure that the ‘marine gear’ (transmission) is of the proper reduction gear ratio.

I believe the smallest (current) Yanmar (2YM15) has been adapted to the Flicka as a replacement for 1GM and 1GM10 models (no longer available new in U.S.).  Yanmar has migrated to ‘common-rail’ electronically controlled injection on most of their newer models.  My preference towards the older ‘mechanical injection’ technology has shifted my focus to Beta, as all of their smaller engine offerings are still purely mechanical injection.

Again, I have nothing at all against Nanni engines.  My concern is with finding the ‘marine’ portion of parts are in the U.S.

Sincerely,
Scott
#392

On Jan 24, 2022, at 11:15 AM, Carol Baker <caroljean848@...> wrote:

Dear Flicka Friends,
My '83 Flicka is in need of a re-power and I am looking for anyone with knowledge about installation of the Nanni 2.10.
Does anyone in our group actually have a Nanni installed?  If so, can we talk?
I have read the past entries on this site and would appreciate very much any information since those were posted.
Carol
s/v Nika  #263 


Nanni diesel engine #advice

Carol Baker
 

Dear Flicka Friends,
My '83 Flicka is in need of a re-power and I am looking for anyone with knowledge about installation of the Nanni 2.10.
Does anyone in our group actually have a Nanni installed?  If so, can we talk?
I have read the past entries on this site and would appreciate very much any information since those were posted.
Carol
s/v Nika  #263 


Re: unsubscribe please

Antonio Martinez
 

Sorry to hear that John.
Whatever is on your plate:  best of luck and may fair winds be in your future soon!
a


On Mon, Jan 24, 2022 at 12:25 PM John via groups.io <jredginton=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Just to confirm my desire to leave the group. health means bucket dream are now out of the window :(

John


unsubscribe please

John
 

Just to confirm my desire to leave the group. health means bucket dream are now out of the window :(

John


Flicka HIN PCS20401B090 El Pablo

Vince DiLeo
 

I found this listing for El Pablo aka Abraxas, Sarnia a 1990 Flicka out of Port Townsend, Washington; I'm interested in purchasing it

Vince DiLeo


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: BOWSPRIT

Matt Corwin
 

John, please pm me and I will send you my number to discuss



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Matt Corwin via groups.io" <bongogram@...>
Date: 1/18/22 2:23 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

I have made complete flicka bowsprits



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "John Sandberg via groups.io" <jksandberg22@...>
Date: 1/17/22 2:57 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

Matt,

Are you building bowsprits complete with “wings”?
If so would love to discuss for possible purchase.

John
s/v Sprout


On Jan 17, 2022, at 10:43 AM, Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...> wrote:


Matt,
I missed the Semco comment.  That's new to me.  Can you elaborate?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 1:33 PM Antonio Martinez via groups.io <middleriverstudio=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
!!  Lovely boat but makes my sanding elbow hurt :-/

I learned to use a scraper in an earlier career as a luthier.  NEVER used sandpaper.  But what a lot of people call a 'paint scraper' (lowes variety) and a cabinetmaker's scraper and the tool and knowledge to put a burr on it, are two *totally* different things.  I still have an almost 40 year old Sandvik scraper that'll make translucent shavings all day long, leaving a perfect finish.  But it is true that it's less than ideal for curves etc.  I have one for that but have never bonded with it.

a

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:00 PM Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
<20211113_092940.jpg>
i

I am no stranger to stripping and finishing teak. I machine and construct
wood stuff for my living since 1984 and have been working on boats most of my life so lots of run ins with teak.
But yes,, there are many cases where scraping can be a superior method of smoothing wood, sometimes involving help from chemicals, but it would have taken years for the most talented scraper man, with a multitude of custom profiled scrapers and the skill to sharpen said scrapers, to do the teak on the boat in the picture I know, it took weeks with the highest quality sanders on the professional market. Heat and scraping was used where possible and then, 60- 120grit to get ready for Semco treatment. 
Trivia...traditional Japanese woodwork uses no sanding partly because sandpaper leaves grit in the work that dulls tools.
Matt

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Date: 1/17/22 9:56 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Re: BOWSPRIT

Matt Corwin
 

I have made complete flicka bowsprits



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "John Sandberg via groups.io" <jksandberg22@...>
Date: 1/17/22 2:57 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

Matt,

Are you building bowsprits complete with “wings”?
If so would love to discuss for possible purchase.

John
s/v Sprout


On Jan 17, 2022, at 10:43 AM, Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...> wrote:


Matt,
I missed the Semco comment.  That's new to me.  Can you elaborate?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 1:33 PM Antonio Martinez via groups.io <middleriverstudio=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
!!  Lovely boat but makes my sanding elbow hurt :-/

I learned to use a scraper in an earlier career as a luthier.  NEVER used sandpaper.  But what a lot of people call a 'paint scraper' (lowes variety) and a cabinetmaker's scraper and the tool and knowledge to put a burr on it, are two *totally* different things.  I still have an almost 40 year old Sandvik scraper that'll make translucent shavings all day long, leaving a perfect finish.  But it is true that it's less than ideal for curves etc.  I have one for that but have never bonded with it.

a

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:00 PM Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
<20211113_092940.jpg>
i

I am no stranger to stripping and finishing teak. I machine and construct
wood stuff for my living since 1984 and have been working on boats most of my life so lots of run ins with teak.
But yes,, there are many cases where scraping can be a superior method of smoothing wood, sometimes involving help from chemicals, but it would have taken years for the most talented scraper man, with a multitude of custom profiled scrapers and the skill to sharpen said scrapers, to do the teak on the boat in the picture I know, it took weeks with the highest quality sanders on the professional market. Heat and scraping was used where possible and then, 60- 120grit to get ready for Semco treatment. 
Trivia...traditional Japanese woodwork uses no sanding partly because sandpaper leaves grit in the work that dulls tools.
Matt

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Date: 1/17/22 9:56 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Re: BOWSPRIT

Nick D
 

This is the color I get with cautious use of the deck cleaner available at Home Depot. The cleaner seems to stay active at least a month holding this color.  This cleaner really finally fixed a mildew problem I was having on my Whaler also visible in the photo.   Nick


Re: BOWSPRIT

John Sandberg
 

Matt,

Are you building bowsprits complete with “wings”?
If so would love to discuss for possible purchase.

John
s/v Sprout


On Jan 17, 2022, at 10:43 AM, Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...> wrote:


Matt,
I missed the Semco comment.  That's new to me.  Can you elaborate?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 1:33 PM Antonio Martinez via groups.io <middleriverstudio=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
!!  Lovely boat but makes my sanding elbow hurt :-/

I learned to use a scraper in an earlier career as a luthier.  NEVER used sandpaper.  But what a lot of people call a 'paint scraper' (lowes variety) and a cabinetmaker's scraper and the tool and knowledge to put a burr on it, are two *totally* different things.  I still have an almost 40 year old Sandvik scraper that'll make translucent shavings all day long, leaving a perfect finish.  But it is true that it's less than ideal for curves etc.  I have one for that but have never bonded with it.

a

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:00 PM Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
<20211113_092940.jpg>
i

I am no stranger to stripping and finishing teak. I machine and construct
wood stuff for my living since 1984 and have been working on boats most of my life so lots of run ins with teak.
But yes,, there are many cases where scraping can be a superior method of smoothing wood, sometimes involving help from chemicals, but it would have taken years for the most talented scraper man, with a multitude of custom profiled scrapers and the skill to sharpen said scrapers, to do the teak on the boat in the picture I know, it took weeks with the highest quality sanders on the professional market. Heat and scraping was used where possible and then, 60- 120grit to get ready for Semco treatment. 
Trivia...traditional Japanese woodwork uses no sanding partly because sandpaper leaves grit in the work that dulls tools.
Matt

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Date: 1/17/22 9:56 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Re: I ran into an unlimited channel marker at night

Steve
 

Great. Will do but it will be a few weeks. I live 12 hours away from by boat and it will be a few weeks before i get back to it. 
Thanks,
Steve Davis

On Monday, January 17, 2022, 10:44:38 AM CST, Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram@...> wrote:


If you mail me the broken part I'll make you a reproduction part, one tricky thing is aligning the bolt holes correctly so I need the original.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Steve via groups.io" <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS@...>
Date: 1/16/22 9:57 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka 20 Group <flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] I ran into an unlimited channel marker at night







Re: BOWSPRIT

Antonio Martinez
 

Matt,
I missed the Semco comment.  That's new to me.  Can you elaborate?
thx
a


On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 1:33 PM Antonio Martinez via groups.io <middleriverstudio=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
!!  Lovely boat but makes my sanding elbow hurt :-/

I learned to use a scraper in an earlier career as a luthier.  NEVER used sandpaper.  But what a lot of people call a 'paint scraper' (lowes variety) and a cabinetmaker's scraper and the tool and knowledge to put a burr on it, are two *totally* different things.  I still have an almost 40 year old Sandvik scraper that'll make translucent shavings all day long, leaving a perfect finish.  But it is true that it's less than ideal for curves etc.  I have one for that but have never bonded with it.

a

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:00 PM Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
i

I am no stranger to stripping and finishing teak. I machine and construct
wood stuff for my living since 1984 and have been working on boats most of my life so lots of run ins with teak.
But yes,, there are many cases where scraping can be a superior method of smoothing wood, sometimes involving help from chemicals, but it would have taken years for the most talented scraper man, with a multitude of custom profiled scrapers and the skill to sharpen said scrapers, to do the teak on the boat in the picture I know, it took weeks with the highest quality sanders on the professional market. Heat and scraping was used where possible and then, 60- 120grit to get ready for Semco treatment. 
Trivia...traditional Japanese woodwork uses no sanding partly because sandpaper leaves grit in the work that dulls tools.
Matt

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Date: 1/17/22 9:56 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Re: BOWSPRIT

Antonio Martinez
 

!!  Lovely boat but makes my sanding elbow hurt :-/

I learned to use a scraper in an earlier career as a luthier.  NEVER used sandpaper.  But what a lot of people call a 'paint scraper' (lowes variety) and a cabinetmaker's scraper and the tool and knowledge to put a burr on it, are two *totally* different things.  I still have an almost 40 year old Sandvik scraper that'll make translucent shavings all day long, leaving a perfect finish.  But it is true that it's less than ideal for curves etc.  I have one for that but have never bonded with it.

a


On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:00 PM Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
i

I am no stranger to stripping and finishing teak. I machine and construct
wood stuff for my living since 1984 and have been working on boats most of my life so lots of run ins with teak.
But yes,, there are many cases where scraping can be a superior method of smoothing wood, sometimes involving help from chemicals, but it would have taken years for the most talented scraper man, with a multitude of custom profiled scrapers and the skill to sharpen said scrapers, to do the teak on the boat in the picture I know, it took weeks with the highest quality sanders on the professional market. Heat and scraping was used where possible and then, 60- 120grit to get ready for Semco treatment. 
Trivia...traditional Japanese woodwork uses no sanding partly because sandpaper leaves grit in the work that dulls tools.
Matt

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Date: 1/17/22 9:56 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Re: BOWSPRIT

Matt Corwin
 

i

I am no stranger to stripping and finishing teak. I machine and construct
wood stuff for my living since 1984 and have been working on boats most of my life so lots of run ins with teak.
But yes,, there are many cases where scraping can be a superior method of smoothing wood, sometimes involving help from chemicals, but it would have taken years for the most talented scraper man, with a multitude of custom profiled scrapers and the skill to sharpen said scrapers, to do the teak on the boat in the picture I know, it took weeks with the highest quality sanders on the professional market. Heat and scraping was used where possible and then, 60- 120grit to get ready for Semco treatment. 
Trivia...traditional Japanese woodwork uses no sanding partly because sandpaper leaves grit in the work that dulls tools.
Matt

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Date: 1/17/22 9:56 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Re: I ran into an unlimited channel marker at night

Matt Corwin
 

If you mail me the broken part I'll make you a reproduction part, one tricky thing is aligning the bolt holes correctly so I need the original.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Steve via groups.io" <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS@...>
Date: 1/16/22 9:57 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka 20 Group <flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] I ran into an unlimited channel marker at night







Re: BOWSPRIT

Antonio Martinez
 

Nick,
Can you elaborate a little on 'light bleach'?  Do you not use any oil at all?
Our toerail was in Cetol but is now partially stripped.  I've pondered continuing with Cetol, changing to Epiphanes, or letting it silver naturally.
a


On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 9:56 AM Nick D <sailvela@...> wrote:
You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Re: BOWSPRIT

Nick D
 

You’d be surprised if you’re careful you can get a polished finished if you hold sharp scraper at 90 degrees. Not tearing at it as with a house scraper. The scraper will only take the hard wood.  I keep the toe rail natural with a light bleach a few times per year with no harm done. 


Teak toersil

Steve
 






I ran into an unlimited channel marker at night

Steve
 







Re: BOWSPRIT

Steve
 

Thanks for all the help.  Matt, do you build the wings fir the bowsprit?  Is so I'd like to order one from ya. I damaged mine.


On Fri, Jan 14, 2022 at 8:47 AM, Matt Corwin via groups.io
<bongogram@...> wrote:



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Steve via groups.io" <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS@...>
Date: 1/13/22 4:16 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka 20 Group <flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

A few months ago I saw someone here made a beautiful bowsprit "wing" but  I  lost the contact and pic.  I'd like to hire that person to build be one for me  do to i busted one wing off.  If anyone can help id really appreciate it.  

Also, my toe rail is teak.  Anyone taken off teak toe rail before? 

Thanks
Steve


Re: BOWSPRIT

Matt Corwin
 

Did you mean oily woods? I assume spellchecker sabotaged your sentence but in any case scraping is not always an option and never an option for attaining the final smoothness required for many finishes. 
Teak is very fibrous and can get pretty torn up with scraping.
The most important thing is maintaining whatever finish is on the wood so as to avoid the always destructive refinishing process.
Every time the teak goes grey, the pithy grains are worn and washed away and the wood is left with the rough ridges of the tough grains above the softer pithy grain. This condition is desirable for natural non-skid of a deck but IMHO too rough for brightwork. 
Sooo, now when the wood gets sanded back to smooth for varnish, a lot of wood thickness is lost and that is why we see so many older boats  with the bungs falling out of the holes.
Got to keep up with the #%@$$ varnish!



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Date: 1/16/22 10:10 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] BOWSPRIT

Teak and other woods should be scraped rather than sanded. 

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