Date   

Re: #advice #advice

Morris London
 

That's an interesting observation you've made, so I went down to my boat yesterday and had a look.  My boat is exactly as you describe yours.  In the topside photo the camera is looking at the port side of the boat, and is positioned so the starboard upper (cap shroud) is hidden by the port upper.  You can just see the fitting at the end of the starboard shroud at the forward edge of the port wire.  Forward is to the left in this image.  As can be seen in the photo the base of the mast is clearly aft of the lower portion of those shrouds.  My tabernacle is also apparently positioned like yours, and it would appear that turning it around would move the base of the mast forward.  One comment here; since the bolt through the tabernacle and the mast is not centered (fore and aft) in the mast, turning the tabernacle around will also result in pushing the mast far enough forward that it will slightly overhang the base of the tabernacle.  (I've added a hinge under my tabernacle, but mounted it all so that the tabernacle is effectively where it used to be.)

One other thing to consider if you move the mast forward would be that will affect the length of all the other shrouds and stays.  The 3 forward of the mast will need to be taken up slightly, so be sure there's enough space in the turnbuckles.  The 4 aft of the mast will need to be let out, so be sure there's enough thread on the fittings.  

And, as Priscilla points out this will all affect the trim of the boat.  If you move the base of the mast without adjusting all the stays you've increased the rake a bit.  Off the top of my head I'm not sure what moving the rig forward and maintaining the rake would do to balance and weather helm, I would expect it to ease weather helm for the same rake.  

A final observation on my boat is that the tabernacle is mounted pretty far forward on the arch, see the interior photo (forward is to the right in the image).  In the topside photo, the electrical plug for the mast cable is located so that the wiring through the deck just misses the forward edge of the arch.  The arch cannot be centered under the mast because of the forward hatch.  The port and starboard bulkheads are placed at about the center of the tabernacle.  I don't know what the structural impact of moving the mast further forward on the arch would be.  

So, since it appears what you have is as designed (or at least as originally built), I would heed Priscilla's advice and not change what has probably worked for hundreds of Flickas.

Welcome to the forum.  Tell us a little about you and your boat.

Morris London
"Golden Crown", #242, 1983


From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> on behalf of michaeloittinen@... <michaeloittinen@...>
Sent: Friday, January 29, 2021 2:44 PM
To: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: [Flicka20] #advice
 
New to posting on this site, hope I’m doing this right.  I’m am a little baffled, my center shroud attaches to the chain plate just forward of the mast. I thought the tabernacle may have been installed incorrectly and if I spun it around it would push the base of the mast forward to try to center shroud on mast. I have found four other Flicka’s in the marina and all have the shroud attaching just like mine. Is this how it was designed?

Mike Oittinen


Re: Broken companion way board

Fred C
 

My top board cracked.  Went to the local lumber yard scrap bin and got a couple of pieces of teak about 3" wide and maybe 1/2" thick.  Cut it to length to fit within the slide at the same angle.  Epoxied the two pieces of the board together and let it cure.  Then put the wood strips on either side and bolted through with bronze from the outside through the strip, board and the inside strip.  Used bronze wood screws from the interior through the strip, board and into the exterior strip.

Sorry I don't have a picture bur it turned out well.

Fred
s/v Tondelayo
St Petersburg, FL


Sent with ProtonMail Secure Email.

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Sunday, January 31, 2021 5:19 PM, Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS@...> wrote:



I was careless and broke my middle companion way board. Any advise on how to repair it? Would gluing it hold? If it can't be fixed, anyone knows who makes these?




Re: Broken companion way board

Antonio Martinez
 


I would use epoxy.  It’ll be hard to make it invisible but could be done.
Or just buy some new teak...

On Jan 31, 2021, at 5:20 PM, Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS@...> wrote:


<20210131_160933.jpg>


I was careless and broke my middle companion way board. Any advise on how to repair it? Would gluing it hold? If it can't be fixed, anyone knows who makes these?


<20210131_160933.jpg>


Re: Broken companion way board

Antonio Martinez
 

Do you mean split along the grain (horizontally)?  If so, yes.  I would not hesitate to glue it back together.  You’d need some good clamps or look up how to do a luthiers clamp with some cord and some scraps of wood.

On Jan 31, 2021, at 5:20 PM, Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS@...> wrote:


<20210131_160933.jpg>


I was careless and broke my middle companion way board. Any advise on how to repair it? Would gluing it hold? If it can't be fixed, anyone knows who makes these?


<20210131_160933.jpg>


Broken companion way board

Steve
 



I was careless and broke my middle companion way board. Any advise on how to repair it? Would gluing it hold? If it can't be fixed, anyone knows who makes these?



Re: #advice #advice

Priscilla Wheatley
 

Yes.  Tuning the rig on a Flicka is very important.  For example, very small changes in the rake of the mast can get you severe weather helm.  Small changes to the shrouds can affect the mast by pulling the masthead off center or bending it.

Flickas are rugged boats and Pacific Seacraft built them to be seaworthy.  They stopped building them because the price got so high.  The space on the factory floor could be used to build a Crealock 34 or 37.  Flickas are so small that they were sort of hand built by one person. That's all they have room for.  PS couldn't make money on the Flicka.  They were better off building a Crealock in the same spot.  

Unless you see something that belies a major change by a prior owner leave everything as is.  


#advice #advice

Michael Oittinen
 

New to posting on this site, hope I’m doing this right.  I’m am a little baffled, my center shroud attaches to the chain plate just forward of the mast. I thought the tabernacle may have been installed incorrectly and if I spun it around it would push the base of the mast forward to try to center shroud on mast. I have found four other Flicka’s in the marina and all have the shroud attaching just like mine. Is this how it was designed?

Mike Oittinen


old bahamma channel

Steve
 

Has any of my fellow Flicka Friends ever sailed down the Old Bahama Channel or have any advise on doing it?


Re: The Echo of a Dream Reborn #intro

Charles Dewell
 

Follow your dream - adventure awaits!



Charles S. Dewell, LMFT 103080
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
La Vie Counseling Centers
——
650 Sierra Madre Villa, Suite 110
Pasadena, CA 91107
——
3201 Wilshire Bl., Suite 203
Santa Monica, CA 90403
——
(626) 351-9616 x 131
www.LaVieCounseling.org

The information contained in this email is privileged and confidential information intended only for the use of the individual or entity named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient or the employee or agent responsible to deliver it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender and destroy the original message. 

On Jan 27, 2021, at 10:47 AM, Laurence Holden <art.laurence.holden@...> wrote:


Crazy? No, just a solid dreamer with plenty of experience. You’ll get there. Bon voyage!
“No hay camino, se hace camino al andar.” - Antonio Machado
“There is no road, the road is made by walking.”
Info on my art: Drawing From Our Own True Nature:

On Jan 27, 2021, at 1:40 PM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

[Written in June of 2019 for some friends online wondering what I was up to]
 
When I was 16 years old (1988) I read a book called "Cruising in Seraffyn" by Lin and Larry Pardey, which was originally Published in 1976. In the next 6 months I read another 4 or 5 books about people who lived and sail aboard boats traveling around the world.
 
The seed was planted.
 
In my 47 years I have had several opportunities to set a life course in pursuit of this dream.
 
Marriage, children, and jobs have all weighed heavy in the balance leaving the dream unsought.
 
The dream was not necessarily unfed all those years, although it was the last 15 years. I joined a Charity Organization, at 22 years of age, that used Ships as Hospitals and travelled to many countries. I even met my lovely wife, a Kiwi, on-board.
 
During the early years of my dream, I read everything I could get my hands on, and regularly could be found walking around different Pacific Northwest Docks, climbing aboard various ships that were for sale.
 
But then the famine years of the dream commenced, I cast the dream aside in response to higher responsibilities.
 
Now at 47 years old, I find the dream resurfacing. For many years I just set it aside and did not pursue it. In some ways the unfulfillment of it was too painful to continue to think about, until now.
 
Something changed in the Winter [NZ] of 2019.
 
Maybe it was the knowledge that my children are just a few years from adulthood and creating their own homes and lives. Maybe it was the drudgery of a 20-year-old career in IT. Maybe it was the fear of unfulfilled dreams, the regret, and that I would get to old to even pursue it.
 
In all my years I have "started" over as it were, many times, so I am not afraid of change or hardship.
 
Both my wife and I have always relished the times in our lives where we started something new. She is much like me in this regard.
 
So, what does all the preamble mean?
 
It means I am setting forward on a journey to small boat ownership and live aboard cruising.
 
So, what does a Small Sailboat look like?
 
20 to 24 foot Length Overall (6-7.5 m). Full Keel, Heavy Displacement, Aft Hung Rudder, Cutter/Sloop Rig, Motor optional - outboard preferred.
 
Now this is not something I just figured out, I have read and studied the subject for decades. Weighed the ins and out of various vessels, and the required accouterments.
 
What vessel do I think is perfect for my endeavor?
 
The Flicka 20 designed by Bruce Bingham as a cruiser and first built in 1974.
 
18 ft (5.5 m) at the waterline
20 ft (6.1 m) length overall (LOA)
24 ft (7.3 m) LOA including the Bow Sprit
She displaces 6,000 lbs with her 1,800 lbs ballast.
 
She sports nearly 6 ft (1.8 m) of headroom inside, with a wide 8 ft (2.4 m) beam, drawing only 3 ft 3 inches (1 m) of water.
 
Cutter rigged she has 243 square ft. (74 square m) of Sail Area.
 
Mostly built by Pacific Seacraft, and Nor'Star Fiberglass Yachts, 400 were built since 1974.
 
They currently sell between 10 and 50 thousand US dollars depending on condition and location.
 
Now, The hunt begins... How long will this take? Years probably. but the journey is much more exciting than the destination.
 
Questions? Thoughts?
 
Please feel free to comment or query.
 
Think I'm crazy? - Yes, mostly likely so.


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

Jim Hooker
 

Welcome and good luck on your search for your dream boat. People on this group love and cherish their Flickas and will give great advice. One note from me. Overseas transport, while not impossible, is a challenge. A Flicka might fit within the limits of the inside of a 24’ container, it won’t go through the door of a standard 8’ wide. There are extra wide maxi 40’ ones which would clear it, but most ships are not laid out to fit them. If you find one on a trailer, it might be easier to move it on a roll on roll off freighter (ROROj than in a container. When you locate one you think suitable, talk to a shipping agent in your area to figure the best way to get it there. I have my own preference re the engine. Ours is a 1GM (6.8hp) which is great for fighting the wind and river currents we deal with here. I would prefer a 1gm10 for the extra capacity but we have what we have. With our experience with the inboard I wouldn’t do an outboard just because of the number of times we need power now and the extra steps of the outboard would have put us in trouble. In our case it is usually some big power boat (or more than one) has boxed us into a situation of literally a rock or a hard place with wind and current against us.  Just my opinion and we know what that’s worth. Again, good luck and welcome to the club.

Jim Hooker
sv Niamh #278
Detroit

On Jan 27, 2021, at 12:18 PM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

CaptainJohn49
 

Hey Matt:

I have to agree the Nor Sea 27 was another boat I have looked at and I wanted the aft cabin version.  Everything a boat should be.  In my case the extra weight made me decide to pass.  Great boat, I’m certain that anyone who has one loves it.

John


On Jan 27, 2021, at 12:41, Matt Corwin via groups.io <bongogram@...> wrote:


Hi, please check out the Lyle Hess Nor Sea 27 trailerable double ender, it is a fantastic sea boat with gorgeous lines and on average a bit less pricey than the Dana.

Matt



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: CaptainJohn49 <johnschubert0711@...>
Date: 1/27/21 2:16 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Cc: John Schubert <johnschubert0711@...>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] #Flicka_Wanted

David the Dana 24 would be my first option.  The extra room makes a big difference. I was going to buy a Dana but at the last minute I decided to buy the Flicka.  The Flicka is very easy to tow and lighter but I was in love with the Dana.  

I also looked at the Allegra 24 and I didn’t like it.  There are very few to choose from.  The one I looked at had a new Triad trailer but the boat was a work in process. Too much for me. I offered $20k for the whole setup boat and trailer.  The owner turned me down so I left.  3 days later he asked me if I’d come back and do the deal for $15k.  Would have bee great but I was already 1,000 miles away so I said no again. My opinion of the Allegra is that it isn’t very well laid out.  Just my 2 cents worth.

Baba 30 is not a boat I have seen in person so I have no opinion.

In NZ I’m surprised that you don’t have some 28 ft. Bristol Channel Cutters.  I was going to buy one in 2017 but it’s not something to trailer.

One thing you have to decide - are you looking for something to trailer such as the Flicka or Dana?  You can trailer anything with a large enough truck but 24 ft. and 8,000 lb. displacement is a practical limit for the average full size pickup.

John

On Jan 27, 2021, at 11:29 AM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

Thank you all for the advisement, especially the shipping option. 

Going to the U.S. [I'm a US Expat living in NZ for last 7 years]and finding one, then having it shipped home in a container, might be the best option [with Covid precautions].  Maybe it is also cheaper shipping in a container from West Coast instead of East Coast - so no additional cost for going via Canal.

A Dana24, Allegra24, or Baba30 would be other options, though much more expensive, so the Flicka20 will always be my first want/love/choice! 

It appears to also be less expensive than those three other ships, which would make the shipping costs much less as the others would need to be sailed here, shipped at higher costs, or found here in this region.  That brings me back to Flicka being the most and only choice in my mind. 

Buy right the first time, go small, go slow... that is the dream.



Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

Matt Corwin
 

Hi, please check out the Lyle Hess Nor Sea 27 trailerable double ender, it is a fantastic sea boat with gorgeous lines and on average a bit less pricey than the Dana.

Matt



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: CaptainJohn49 <johnschubert0711@...>
Date: 1/27/21 2:16 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Cc: John Schubert <johnschubert0711@...>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] #Flicka_Wanted

David the Dana 24 would be my first option.  The extra room makes a big difference. I was going to buy a Dana but at the last minute I decided to buy the Flicka.  The Flicka is very easy to tow and lighter but I was in love with the Dana.  

I also looked at the Allegra 24 and I didn’t like it.  There are very few to choose from.  The one I looked at had a new Triad trailer but the boat was a work in process. Too much for me. I offered $20k for the whole setup boat and trailer.  The owner turned me down so I left.  3 days later he asked me if I’d come back and do the deal for $15k.  Would have bee great but I was already 1,000 miles away so I said no again. My opinion of the Allegra is that it isn’t very well laid out.  Just my 2 cents worth.

Baba 30 is not a boat I have seen in person so I have no opinion.

In NZ I’m surprised that you don’t have some 28 ft. Bristol Channel Cutters.  I was going to buy one in 2017 but it’s not something to trailer.

One thing you have to decide - are you looking for something to trailer such as the Flicka or Dana?  You can trailer anything with a large enough truck but 24 ft. and 8,000 lb. displacement is a practical limit for the average full size pickup.

John

On Jan 27, 2021, at 11:29 AM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

Thank you all for the advisement, especially the shipping option. 

Going to the U.S. [I'm a US Expat living in NZ for last 7 years]and finding one, then having it shipped home in a container, might be the best option [with Covid precautions].  Maybe it is also cheaper shipping in a container from West Coast instead of East Coast - so no additional cost for going via Canal.

A Dana24, Allegra24, or Baba30 would be other options, though much more expensive, so the Flicka20 will always be my first want/love/choice! 

It appears to also be less expensive than those three other ships, which would make the shipping costs much less as the others would need to be sailed here, shipped at higher costs, or found here in this region.  That brings me back to Flicka being the most and only choice in my mind. 

Buy right the first time, go small, go slow... that is the dream.



Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

CaptainJohn49
 

David the Dana 24 would be my first option.  The extra room makes a big difference. I was going to buy a Dana but at the last minute I decided to buy the Flicka.  The Flicka is very easy to tow and lighter but I was in love with the Dana.  

I also looked at the Allegra 24 and I didn’t like it.  There are very few to choose from.  The one I looked at had a new Triad trailer but the boat was a work in process. Too much for me. I offered $20k for the whole setup boat and trailer.  The owner turned me down so I left.  3 days later he asked me if I’d come back and do the deal for $15k.  Would have bee great but I was already 1,000 miles away so I said no again. My opinion of the Allegra is that it isn’t very well laid out.  Just my 2 cents worth.

Baba 30 is not a boat I have seen in person so I have no opinion.

In NZ I’m surprised that you don’t have some 28 ft. Bristol Channel Cutters.  I was going to buy one in 2017 but it’s not something to trailer.

One thing you have to decide - are you looking for something to trailer such as the Flicka or Dana?  You can trailer anything with a large enough truck but 24 ft. and 8,000 lb. displacement is a practical limit for the average full size pickup.

John

On Jan 27, 2021, at 11:29 AM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

Thank you all for the advisement, especially the shipping option. 

Going to the U.S. [I'm a US Expat living in NZ for last 7 years]and finding one, then having it shipped home in a container, might be the best option [with Covid precautions].  Maybe it is also cheaper shipping in a container from West Coast instead of East Coast - so no additional cost for going via Canal.

A Dana24, Allegra24, or Baba30 would be other options, though much more expensive, so the Flicka20 will always be my first want/love/choice! 

It appears to also be less expensive than those three other ships, which would make the shipping costs much less as the others would need to be sailed here, shipped at higher costs, or found here in this region.  That brings me back to Flicka being the most and only choice in my mind. 

Buy right the first time, go small, go slow... that is the dream.



Re: The Echo of a Dream Reborn #intro

Laurence Holden
 

Crazy? No, just a solid dreamer with plenty of experience. You’ll get there. Bon voyage!
“No hay camino, se hace camino al andar.” - Antonio Machado
“There is no road, the road is made by walking.”
Info on my art: Drawing From Our Own True Nature:

On Jan 27, 2021, at 1:40 PM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

[Written in June of 2019 for some friends online wondering what I was up to]
 
When I was 16 years old (1988) I read a book called "Cruising in Seraffyn" by Lin and Larry Pardey, which was originally Published in 1976. In the next 6 months I read another 4 or 5 books about people who lived and sail aboard boats traveling around the world.
 
The seed was planted.
 
In my 47 years I have had several opportunities to set a life course in pursuit of this dream.
 
Marriage, children, and jobs have all weighed heavy in the balance leaving the dream unsought.
 
The dream was not necessarily unfed all those years, although it was the last 15 years. I joined a Charity Organization, at 22 years of age, that used Ships as Hospitals and travelled to many countries. I even met my lovely wife, a Kiwi, on-board.
 
During the early years of my dream, I read everything I could get my hands on, and regularly could be found walking around different Pacific Northwest Docks, climbing aboard various ships that were for sale.
 
But then the famine years of the dream commenced, I cast the dream aside in response to higher responsibilities.
 
Now at 47 years old, I find the dream resurfacing. For many years I just set it aside and did not pursue it. In some ways the unfulfillment of it was too painful to continue to think about, until now.
 
Something changed in the Winter [NZ] of 2019.
 
Maybe it was the knowledge that my children are just a few years from adulthood and creating their own homes and lives. Maybe it was the drudgery of a 20-year-old career in IT. Maybe it was the fear of unfulfilled dreams, the regret, and that I would get to old to even pursue it.
 
In all my years I have "started" over as it were, many times, so I am not afraid of change or hardship.
 
Both my wife and I have always relished the times in our lives where we started something new. She is much like me in this regard.
 
So, what does all the preamble mean?
 
It means I am setting forward on a journey to small boat ownership and live aboard cruising.
 
So, what does a Small Sailboat look like?
 
20 to 24 foot Length Overall (6-7.5 m). Full Keel, Heavy Displacement, Aft Hung Rudder, Cutter/Sloop Rig, Motor optional - outboard preferred.
 
Now this is not something I just figured out, I have read and studied the subject for decades. Weighed the ins and out of various vessels, and the required accouterments.
 
What vessel do I think is perfect for my endeavor?
 
The Flicka 20 designed by Bruce Bingham as a cruiser and first built in 1974.
 
18 ft (5.5 m) at the waterline
20 ft (6.1 m) length overall (LOA)
24 ft (7.3 m) LOA including the Bow Sprit
She displaces 6,000 lbs with her 1,800 lbs ballast.
 
She sports nearly 6 ft (1.8 m) of headroom inside, with a wide 8 ft (2.4 m) beam, drawing only 3 ft 3 inches (1 m) of water.
 
Cutter rigged she has 243 square ft. (74 square m) of Sail Area.
 
Mostly built by Pacific Seacraft, and Nor'Star Fiberglass Yachts, 400 were built since 1974.
 
They currently sell between 10 and 50 thousand US dollars depending on condition and location.
 
Now, The hunt begins... How long will this take? Years probably. but the journey is much more exciting than the destination.
 
Questions? Thoughts?
 
Please feel free to comment or query.
 
Think I'm crazy? - Yes, mostly likely so.


The Echo of a Dream Reborn #intro

David
 

[Written in June of 2019 for some friends online wondering what I was up to]
 
When I was 16 years old (1988) I read a book called "Cruising in Seraffyn" by Lin and Larry Pardey, which was originally Published in 1976. In the next 6 months I read another 4 or 5 books about people who lived and sail aboard boats traveling around the world.
 
The seed was planted.
 
In my 47 years I have had several opportunities to set a life course in pursuit of this dream.
 
Marriage, children, and jobs have all weighed heavy in the balance leaving the dream unsought.
 
The dream was not necessarily unfed all those years, although it was the last 15 years. I joined a Charity Organization, at 22 years of age, that used Ships as Hospitals and travelled to many countries. I even met my lovely wife, a Kiwi, on-board.
 
During the early years of my dream, I read everything I could get my hands on, and regularly could be found walking around different Pacific Northwest Docks, climbing aboard various ships that were for sale.
 
But then the famine years of the dream commenced, I cast the dream aside in response to higher responsibilities.
 
Now at 47 years old, I find the dream resurfacing. For many years I just set it aside and did not pursue it. In some ways the unfulfillment of it was too painful to continue to think about, until now.
 
Something changed in the Winter [NZ] of 2019.
 
Maybe it was the knowledge that my children are just a few years from adulthood and creating their own homes and lives. Maybe it was the drudgery of a 20-year-old career in IT. Maybe it was the fear of unfulfilled dreams, the regret, and that I would get to old to even pursue it.
 
In all my years I have "started" over as it were, many times, so I am not afraid of change or hardship.
 
Both my wife and I have always relished the times in our lives where we started something new. She is much like me in this regard.
 
So, what does all the preamble mean?
 
It means I am setting forward on a journey to small boat ownership and live aboard cruising.
 
So, what does a Small Sailboat look like?
 
20 to 24 foot Length Overall (6-7.5 m). Full Keel, Heavy Displacement, Aft Hung Rudder, Cutter/Sloop Rig, Motor optional - outboard preferred.
 
Now this is not something I just figured out, I have read and studied the subject for decades. Weighed the ins and out of various vessels, and the required accouterments.
 
What vessel do I think is perfect for my endeavor?
 
The Flicka 20 designed by Bruce Bingham as a cruiser and first built in 1974.
 
18 ft (5.5 m) at the waterline
20 ft (6.1 m) length overall (LOA)
24 ft (7.3 m) LOA including the Bow Sprit
She displaces 6,000 lbs with her 1,800 lbs ballast.
 
She sports nearly 6 ft (1.8 m) of headroom inside, with a wide 8 ft (2.4 m) beam, drawing only 3 ft 3 inches (1 m) of water.
 
Cutter rigged she has 243 square ft. (74 square m) of Sail Area.
 
Mostly built by Pacific Seacraft, and Nor'Star Fiberglass Yachts, 400 were built since 1974.
 
They currently sell between 10 and 50 thousand US dollars depending on condition and location.
 
Now, The hunt begins... How long will this take? Years probably. but the journey is much more exciting than the destination.
 
Questions? Thoughts?
 
Please feel free to comment or query.
 
Think I'm crazy? - Yes, mostly likely so.


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

David
 
Edited

Thank you all for the advisement, especially the shipping option. 

Going to the U.S. [I'm a US Expat living in NZ for last 7 years] and finding one, then having it shipped home in a container, might be the best option [with Covid precautions].  Maybe it is also cheaper shipping in a container from West Coast instead of East Coast - so no additional cost for going via Canal.

A Dana24, Allegra24, or Baba30 would be other options, though much more expensive, so the Flicka20 will always be my first want/love/choice! 

It appears to also be less expensive than those three other ships, which would make the shipping costs much less as the others would need to be sailed here, shipped at higher costs, or found here in this region.  That brings me back to Flicka being the most and only choice in my mind. 

Buy right the first time, go small, go slow... that is the dream.


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

Antonio Martinez
 


Someone down there had a Flicka!

On Jan 27, 2021, at 12:18 PM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

cyclingarmadillo
 

Good luck David. We hope you find one near NZ. I LOVE New Zealand. Spent a week in Nelson area a few years ago. Can't wait to return.

We LOVE our 1990 Flicka (SV Mona, hull #388). Mona's land locked on a Lake in Austin, TX USA. Would rather be in NZ for sure!

Fair winds and following seas!

Mark & Alla


On Wed, Jan 27, 2021, 11:18 AM David <davidandlara@...> wrote:
I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

CaptainJohn49
 

Hi David:

Thanks for joining.  I have a Flicka #363 so I know a little about them.. I also haul shipping containers for a living.  Some people have suggested that a Flicka will fit in a container when stripped down. The boat may fit in a 20’ but I’m not certain about the mast you could always section the mast or ship in in a larger container. Just a thought. I don’t think anyone has ever sailed to NZ in one so I don’t think you are going to find any one way Flickas.  There are plenty in the US and MX.. I have a friend that has one in LaPaz, MX that she wants to sell very reasonably.

Best of luck and welcome to the club.

CaptianJohn49

On Jan 27, 2021, at 9:49 AM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


#Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

David
 

I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted

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