Date   

Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

Matt Corwin
 

Hi, please check out the Lyle Hess Nor Sea 27 trailerable double ender, it is a fantastic sea boat with gorgeous lines and on average a bit less pricey than the Dana.

Matt



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: CaptainJohn49 <johnschubert0711@...>
Date: 1/27/21 2:16 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Cc: John Schubert <johnschubert0711@...>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] #Flicka_Wanted

David the Dana 24 would be my first option.  The extra room makes a big difference. I was going to buy a Dana but at the last minute I decided to buy the Flicka.  The Flicka is very easy to tow and lighter but I was in love with the Dana.  

I also looked at the Allegra 24 and I didn’t like it.  There are very few to choose from.  The one I looked at had a new Triad trailer but the boat was a work in process. Too much for me. I offered $20k for the whole setup boat and trailer.  The owner turned me down so I left.  3 days later he asked me if I’d come back and do the deal for $15k.  Would have bee great but I was already 1,000 miles away so I said no again. My opinion of the Allegra is that it isn’t very well laid out.  Just my 2 cents worth.

Baba 30 is not a boat I have seen in person so I have no opinion.

In NZ I’m surprised that you don’t have some 28 ft. Bristol Channel Cutters.  I was going to buy one in 2017 but it’s not something to trailer.

One thing you have to decide - are you looking for something to trailer such as the Flicka or Dana?  You can trailer anything with a large enough truck but 24 ft. and 8,000 lb. displacement is a practical limit for the average full size pickup.

John

On Jan 27, 2021, at 11:29 AM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

Thank you all for the advisement, especially the shipping option. 

Going to the U.S. [I'm a US Expat living in NZ for last 7 years]and finding one, then having it shipped home in a container, might be the best option [with Covid precautions].  Maybe it is also cheaper shipping in a container from West Coast instead of East Coast - so no additional cost for going via Canal.

A Dana24, Allegra24, or Baba30 would be other options, though much more expensive, so the Flicka20 will always be my first want/love/choice! 

It appears to also be less expensive than those three other ships, which would make the shipping costs much less as the others would need to be sailed here, shipped at higher costs, or found here in this region.  That brings me back to Flicka being the most and only choice in my mind. 

Buy right the first time, go small, go slow... that is the dream.



Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

CaptainJohn49
 

David the Dana 24 would be my first option.  The extra room makes a big difference. I was going to buy a Dana but at the last minute I decided to buy the Flicka.  The Flicka is very easy to tow and lighter but I was in love with the Dana.  

I also looked at the Allegra 24 and I didn’t like it.  There are very few to choose from.  The one I looked at had a new Triad trailer but the boat was a work in process. Too much for me. I offered $20k for the whole setup boat and trailer.  The owner turned me down so I left.  3 days later he asked me if I’d come back and do the deal for $15k.  Would have bee great but I was already 1,000 miles away so I said no again. My opinion of the Allegra is that it isn’t very well laid out.  Just my 2 cents worth.

Baba 30 is not a boat I have seen in person so I have no opinion.

In NZ I’m surprised that you don’t have some 28 ft. Bristol Channel Cutters.  I was going to buy one in 2017 but it’s not something to trailer.

One thing you have to decide - are you looking for something to trailer such as the Flicka or Dana?  You can trailer anything with a large enough truck but 24 ft. and 8,000 lb. displacement is a practical limit for the average full size pickup.

John

On Jan 27, 2021, at 11:29 AM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

Thank you all for the advisement, especially the shipping option. 

Going to the U.S. [I'm a US Expat living in NZ for last 7 years]and finding one, then having it shipped home in a container, might be the best option [with Covid precautions].  Maybe it is also cheaper shipping in a container from West Coast instead of East Coast - so no additional cost for going via Canal.

A Dana24, Allegra24, or Baba30 would be other options, though much more expensive, so the Flicka20 will always be my first want/love/choice! 

It appears to also be less expensive than those three other ships, which would make the shipping costs much less as the others would need to be sailed here, shipped at higher costs, or found here in this region.  That brings me back to Flicka being the most and only choice in my mind. 

Buy right the first time, go small, go slow... that is the dream.



Re: The Echo of a Dream Reborn #intro

Laurence Holden
 

Crazy? No, just a solid dreamer with plenty of experience. You’ll get there. Bon voyage!
“No hay camino, se hace camino al andar.” - Antonio Machado
“There is no road, the road is made by walking.”
Info on my art: Drawing From Our Own True Nature:

On Jan 27, 2021, at 1:40 PM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

[Written in June of 2019 for some friends online wondering what I was up to]
 
When I was 16 years old (1988) I read a book called "Cruising in Seraffyn" by Lin and Larry Pardey, which was originally Published in 1976. In the next 6 months I read another 4 or 5 books about people who lived and sail aboard boats traveling around the world.
 
The seed was planted.
 
In my 47 years I have had several opportunities to set a life course in pursuit of this dream.
 
Marriage, children, and jobs have all weighed heavy in the balance leaving the dream unsought.
 
The dream was not necessarily unfed all those years, although it was the last 15 years. I joined a Charity Organization, at 22 years of age, that used Ships as Hospitals and travelled to many countries. I even met my lovely wife, a Kiwi, on-board.
 
During the early years of my dream, I read everything I could get my hands on, and regularly could be found walking around different Pacific Northwest Docks, climbing aboard various ships that were for sale.
 
But then the famine years of the dream commenced, I cast the dream aside in response to higher responsibilities.
 
Now at 47 years old, I find the dream resurfacing. For many years I just set it aside and did not pursue it. In some ways the unfulfillment of it was too painful to continue to think about, until now.
 
Something changed in the Winter [NZ] of 2019.
 
Maybe it was the knowledge that my children are just a few years from adulthood and creating their own homes and lives. Maybe it was the drudgery of a 20-year-old career in IT. Maybe it was the fear of unfulfilled dreams, the regret, and that I would get to old to even pursue it.
 
In all my years I have "started" over as it were, many times, so I am not afraid of change or hardship.
 
Both my wife and I have always relished the times in our lives where we started something new. She is much like me in this regard.
 
So, what does all the preamble mean?
 
It means I am setting forward on a journey to small boat ownership and live aboard cruising.
 
So, what does a Small Sailboat look like?
 
20 to 24 foot Length Overall (6-7.5 m). Full Keel, Heavy Displacement, Aft Hung Rudder, Cutter/Sloop Rig, Motor optional - outboard preferred.
 
Now this is not something I just figured out, I have read and studied the subject for decades. Weighed the ins and out of various vessels, and the required accouterments.
 
What vessel do I think is perfect for my endeavor?
 
The Flicka 20 designed by Bruce Bingham as a cruiser and first built in 1974.
 
18 ft (5.5 m) at the waterline
20 ft (6.1 m) length overall (LOA)
24 ft (7.3 m) LOA including the Bow Sprit
She displaces 6,000 lbs with her 1,800 lbs ballast.
 
She sports nearly 6 ft (1.8 m) of headroom inside, with a wide 8 ft (2.4 m) beam, drawing only 3 ft 3 inches (1 m) of water.
 
Cutter rigged she has 243 square ft. (74 square m) of Sail Area.
 
Mostly built by Pacific Seacraft, and Nor'Star Fiberglass Yachts, 400 were built since 1974.
 
They currently sell between 10 and 50 thousand US dollars depending on condition and location.
 
Now, The hunt begins... How long will this take? Years probably. but the journey is much more exciting than the destination.
 
Questions? Thoughts?
 
Please feel free to comment or query.
 
Think I'm crazy? - Yes, mostly likely so.


The Echo of a Dream Reborn #intro

David
 

[Written in June of 2019 for some friends online wondering what I was up to]
 
When I was 16 years old (1988) I read a book called "Cruising in Seraffyn" by Lin and Larry Pardey, which was originally Published in 1976. In the next 6 months I read another 4 or 5 books about people who lived and sail aboard boats traveling around the world.
 
The seed was planted.
 
In my 47 years I have had several opportunities to set a life course in pursuit of this dream.
 
Marriage, children, and jobs have all weighed heavy in the balance leaving the dream unsought.
 
The dream was not necessarily unfed all those years, although it was the last 15 years. I joined a Charity Organization, at 22 years of age, that used Ships as Hospitals and travelled to many countries. I even met my lovely wife, a Kiwi, on-board.
 
During the early years of my dream, I read everything I could get my hands on, and regularly could be found walking around different Pacific Northwest Docks, climbing aboard various ships that were for sale.
 
But then the famine years of the dream commenced, I cast the dream aside in response to higher responsibilities.
 
Now at 47 years old, I find the dream resurfacing. For many years I just set it aside and did not pursue it. In some ways the unfulfillment of it was too painful to continue to think about, until now.
 
Something changed in the Winter [NZ] of 2019.
 
Maybe it was the knowledge that my children are just a few years from adulthood and creating their own homes and lives. Maybe it was the drudgery of a 20-year-old career in IT. Maybe it was the fear of unfulfilled dreams, the regret, and that I would get to old to even pursue it.
 
In all my years I have "started" over as it were, many times, so I am not afraid of change or hardship.
 
Both my wife and I have always relished the times in our lives where we started something new. She is much like me in this regard.
 
So, what does all the preamble mean?
 
It means I am setting forward on a journey to small boat ownership and live aboard cruising.
 
So, what does a Small Sailboat look like?
 
20 to 24 foot Length Overall (6-7.5 m). Full Keel, Heavy Displacement, Aft Hung Rudder, Cutter/Sloop Rig, Motor optional - outboard preferred.
 
Now this is not something I just figured out, I have read and studied the subject for decades. Weighed the ins and out of various vessels, and the required accouterments.
 
What vessel do I think is perfect for my endeavor?
 
The Flicka 20 designed by Bruce Bingham as a cruiser and first built in 1974.
 
18 ft (5.5 m) at the waterline
20 ft (6.1 m) length overall (LOA)
24 ft (7.3 m) LOA including the Bow Sprit
She displaces 6,000 lbs with her 1,800 lbs ballast.
 
She sports nearly 6 ft (1.8 m) of headroom inside, with a wide 8 ft (2.4 m) beam, drawing only 3 ft 3 inches (1 m) of water.
 
Cutter rigged she has 243 square ft. (74 square m) of Sail Area.
 
Mostly built by Pacific Seacraft, and Nor'Star Fiberglass Yachts, 400 were built since 1974.
 
They currently sell between 10 and 50 thousand US dollars depending on condition and location.
 
Now, The hunt begins... How long will this take? Years probably. but the journey is much more exciting than the destination.
 
Questions? Thoughts?
 
Please feel free to comment or query.
 
Think I'm crazy? - Yes, mostly likely so.


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

David
 
Edited

Thank you all for the advisement, especially the shipping option. 

Going to the U.S. [I'm a US Expat living in NZ for last 7 years] and finding one, then having it shipped home in a container, might be the best option [with Covid precautions].  Maybe it is also cheaper shipping in a container from West Coast instead of East Coast - so no additional cost for going via Canal.

A Dana24, Allegra24, or Baba30 would be other options, though much more expensive, so the Flicka20 will always be my first want/love/choice! 

It appears to also be less expensive than those three other ships, which would make the shipping costs much less as the others would need to be sailed here, shipped at higher costs, or found here in this region.  That brings me back to Flicka being the most and only choice in my mind. 

Buy right the first time, go small, go slow... that is the dream.


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

Antonio Martinez
 


Someone down there had a Flicka!

On Jan 27, 2021, at 12:18 PM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

cyclingarmadillo
 

Good luck David. We hope you find one near NZ. I LOVE New Zealand. Spent a week in Nelson area a few years ago. Can't wait to return.

We LOVE our 1990 Flicka (SV Mona, hull #388). Mona's land locked on a Lake in Austin, TX USA. Would rather be in NZ for sure!

Fair winds and following seas!

Mark & Alla


On Wed, Jan 27, 2021, 11:18 AM David <davidandlara@...> wrote:
I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


Re: #Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

CaptainJohn49
 

Hi David:

Thanks for joining.  I have a Flicka #363 so I know a little about them.. I also haul shipping containers for a living.  Some people have suggested that a Flicka will fit in a container when stripped down. The boat may fit in a 20’ but I’m not certain about the mast you could always section the mast or ship in in a larger container. Just a thought. I don’t think anyone has ever sailed to NZ in one so I don’t think you are going to find any one way Flickas.  There are plenty in the US and MX.. I have a friend that has one in LaPaz, MX that she wants to sell very reasonably.

Best of luck and welcome to the club.

CaptianJohn49

On Jan 27, 2021, at 9:49 AM, David <davidandlara@...> wrote:

I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


#Flicka_Wanted #Flicka_Wanted

David
 

I live in Auckland, New Zealand.  I have looked online for any Flicka's for sale in NZ for the last year, but not found any.  Anyone know of any in the NZ/AUS South Pacific - Please let me know.  Thank you.   #Flicka_Wanted


Re: Groco thru hulls

Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...>
 

Yes I am absolutely doing it on the hard! 

We used have used boat part places, alas, nothing like that anymore. 
I see Groco makes a lot of items lol so I should clarify , and as we all know it’s the SV Series.
 
We have limited marine stores too...We don't even have Moorage at any convenient marinas, I but I digress!
 
“If” I remove head intake , or better yet, update a seacock, I will have one as a spare,  and am checking to see “if” all the seals and parts are still in good condition- will check all & keep you all posted!!!

Sincerely;
Shannon Rae
SHIIMTI - “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In”
1983 -Flicka 20 - #243

On Jan 24, 2021, at 6:41 AM, Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...> wrote:


Lapping the tapered plug is actually very easy and disassembly not complicated.  When you lap it, you’ll be able to determine if wear is acceptable.

 Something to do while boat is on the hard ;-)

On Jan 24, 2021, at 9:34 AM, Fred C via groups.io <JimB7@...> wrote:


I was just going to recondition mine and there is discussion on this site as to polishing the thru hull and parts, cleaning and lubricating the bung, etc.  As I was doing this I happened upon a set in a local salvage yard in like new condition.  If you do replace Groco has a gate valve type without the bung.


Sent with ProtonMail Secure Email.

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐
On Saturday, January 23, 2021 1:35 PM, Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...> wrote:


Hello!

Do you suggest changing, or have you changed, Groco thru hulls...I saw previous articles on this- and went to check/clean one and when water trickles in, and drips a bit after -heart starts pounding...fear starts to build...!!!
Plus , am I correct in saying:  parts are not plentiful...nor “fresh “?!

Tim I see you did yours?! Nice ones there!

Sincerely 
Shannon Rae
SHIIMTI - “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In”
1983 -Flicka 20 - #243,
201-2065 West 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. V6J 1N3
Cell: 604-805-8350
Fax: 604-731-0638

On Jan 18, 2021, at 7:41 AM, Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:

 Here's the new through hull fittings I replaced last spring, I just duplicated what was there already, just new.

It's circled in red.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.




From: Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 7:14:13 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

Lou,
Any chance you'd have a pic of the T fitting or know what it is?  Also exactly where is it located?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 2:32 AM Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:
One last note about that install that was an added bonus.

The old marine toilet took seawater in from the engine cooling through hull fitting with a Tee on it running to the head. I left the end of that hose in place in the head with an on/off valve on it. Now, when I winterize the 1GM10, I remove the AirHead, place a bucket there with 1.5gal of the pink antifreeze and close the through hull water intake valve. The end of the hose goes into the bucket and the engine sucks it right up and through the seawater separator right into the engine.

I'll use the same flush system during the season to do a fresh water flush every so often after seawater usage.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.




From: Louis Backover <lou.backover@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 2:25:12 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io, "Scott via groups.io" <wilsometer=aol.com@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

There's an older AirHead install doc in the group library. I used this to decide it was the solution for me too. I haven't opened and cleaned the holding tank area yet but I am going to do that too. There's mention about that at the end of the AirHead install document too and how the owner gained some extra storage space.

The AirHead document is old and after talking with the AirHead owner by email he explained that the mounting brackets were since updated so I didn't even need the urine pot wedge underneath.

First time we used it it didn't go great, after I adjusted the amount of Choir and added enzymes no issues what so ever. I'd never go back.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147



<Screenshot_20210118-104006_Facebook.jpg>


Re: Groco thru hulls

Antonio Martinez
 

Lapping the tapered plug is actually very easy and disassembly not complicated.  When you lap it, you’ll be able to determine if wear is acceptable.

 Something to do while boat is on the hard ;-)

On Jan 24, 2021, at 9:34 AM, Fred C via groups.io <JimB7@...> wrote:


I was just going to recondition mine and there is discussion on this site as to polishing the thru hull and parts, cleaning and lubricating the bung, etc.  As I was doing this I happened upon a set in a local salvage yard in like new condition.  If you do replace Groco has a gate valve type without the bung.


Sent with ProtonMail Secure Email.

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐
On Saturday, January 23, 2021 1:35 PM, Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...> wrote:


Hello!

Do you suggest changing, or have you changed, Groco thru hulls...I saw previous articles on this- and went to check/clean one and when water trickles in, and drips a bit after -heart starts pounding...fear starts to build...!!!
Plus , am I correct in saying:  parts are not plentiful...nor “fresh “?!

Tim I see you did yours?! Nice ones there!

Sincerely 
Shannon Rae
SHIIMTI - “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In”
1983 -Flicka 20 - #243,
201-2065 West 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. V6J 1N3
Cell: 604-805-8350
Fax: 604-731-0638

On Jan 18, 2021, at 7:41 AM, Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:

 Here's the new through hull fittings I replaced last spring, I just duplicated what was there already, just new.

It's circled in red.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.




From: Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 7:14:13 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

Lou,
Any chance you'd have a pic of the T fitting or know what it is?  Also exactly where is it located?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 2:32 AM Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:
One last note about that install that was an added bonus.

The old marine toilet took seawater in from the engine cooling through hull fitting with a Tee on it running to the head. I left the end of that hose in place in the head with an on/off valve on it. Now, when I winterize the 1GM10, I remove the AirHead, place a bucket there with 1.5gal of the pink antifreeze and close the through hull water intake valve. The end of the hose goes into the bucket and the engine sucks it right up and through the seawater separator right into the engine.

I'll use the same flush system during the season to do a fresh water flush every so often after seawater usage.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.




From: Louis Backover <lou.backover@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 2:25:12 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io, "Scott via groups.io" <wilsometer=aol.com@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

There's an older AirHead install doc in the group library. I used this to decide it was the solution for me too. I haven't opened and cleaned the holding tank area yet but I am going to do that too. There's mention about that at the end of the AirHead install document too and how the owner gained some extra storage space.

The AirHead document is old and after talking with the AirHead owner by email he explained that the mounting brackets were since updated so I didn't even need the urine pot wedge underneath.

First time we used it it didn't go great, after I adjusted the amount of Choir and added enzymes no issues what so ever. I'd never go back.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147



<Screenshot_20210118-104006_Facebook.jpg>


Re: Groco thru hulls

Fred C
 

I was just going to recondition mine and there is discussion on this site as to polishing the thru hull and parts, cleaning and lubricating the bung, etc.  As I was doing this I happened upon a set in a local salvage yard in like new condition.  If you do replace Groco has a gate valve type without the bung.


Sent with ProtonMail Secure Email.

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Saturday, January 23, 2021 1:35 PM, Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...> wrote:


Hello!

Do you suggest changing, or have you changed, Groco thru hulls...I saw previous articles on this- and went to check/clean one and when water trickles in, and drips a bit after -heart starts pounding...fear starts to build...!!!
Plus , am I correct in saying:  parts are not plentiful...nor “fresh “?!

Tim I see you did yours?! Nice ones there!

Sincerely 
Shannon Rae
SHIIMTI - “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In”
1983 -Flicka 20 - #243,
201-2065 West 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. V6J 1N3
Cell: 604-805-8350
Fax: 604-731-0638

On Jan 18, 2021, at 7:41 AM, Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:

 Here's the new through hull fittings I replaced last spring, I just duplicated what was there already, just new.

It's circled in red.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.




From: Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 7:14:13 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

Lou,
Any chance you'd have a pic of the T fitting or know what it is?  Also exactly where is it located?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 2:32 AM Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:
One last note about that install that was an added bonus.

The old marine toilet took seawater in from the engine cooling through hull fitting with a Tee on it running to the head. I left the end of that hose in place in the head with an on/off valve on it. Now, when I winterize the 1GM10, I remove the AirHead, place a bucket there with 1.5gal of the pink antifreeze and close the through hull water intake valve. The end of the hose goes into the bucket and the engine sucks it right up and through the seawater separator right into the engine.

I'll use the same flush system during the season to do a fresh water flush every so often after seawater usage.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.




From: Louis Backover <lou.backover@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 2:25:12 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io, "Scott via groups.io" <wilsometer=aol.com@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

There's an older AirHead install doc in the group library. I used this to decide it was the solution for me too. I haven't opened and cleaned the holding tank area yet but I am going to do that too. There's mention about that at the end of the AirHead install document too and how the owner gained some extra storage space.

The AirHead document is old and after talking with the AirHead owner by email he explained that the mounting brackets were since updated so I didn't even need the urine pot wedge underneath.

First time we used it it didn't go great, after I adjusted the amount of Choir and added enzymes no issues what so ever. I'd never go back.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147



<Screenshot_20210118-104006_Facebook.jpg>


Re: Raising and lowering a mast: Mast-Step work?

Matt Corwin
 

Its a bad idea to drill any holes through the arch.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...>
Date: 1/17/21 9:18 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Raising and lowering a mast: Mast-Step work?

Thank  you: I will pull mine and check, also re-wiring the VHF and mast lights, etc…and yes, the mast/tabernacle is a hinge of sorts, with the bail at the bottom for support, etc…however, I think i will leave base as-is, other than confirming all sound!!

 

Was tempting to drill it all up centre of support and into mast to tidy up…but then still have holes to fill!!

 

Will send pics of “not normal white, and not black” mast & boom color when done…!!!

 

Thank you!

Sincerely;

Shannon Rae

Vancouver

604-805-8350

 

Attitude Determines Whether it is an Ordeal or an Adventure!

 

From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Laurence Holden
Sent: January 9, 2021 5:56 PM
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Raising and lowering a mast: Mast-Step work?

 

I pried up the base. Replaced with teak. Epoxied the teak but it has flaked off over the last year.

Info on my art: Drawing From Our Own True Nature:


On Jan 9, 2021, at 3:42 PM, Fred C via groups.io <JimB7@...> wrote:

I removed mine.  Removed bolt nuts. backed out nuts.  Gently pried tabernacle from sealant Had JTR in Gulfport Florida make a new on.  Reinstalled.

 

Fred

s/v Tondelayo. 

 

 

Sent with ProtonMail Secure Email.

 

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Saturday, January 9, 2021 2:57 PM, Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...> wrote:

 

Hello everyone!

 

I have taken my mast down, (by two professionals with a gin pole at the dock, boat still in water looking very sleek, hah hah)  and they took it to their shop and I have sanded it bare ready for painting and will get new wiring, etc. on it…and I will share my process shortly, however; I was going to remove the mast step (through bolt at mast heel, open mast bottom, not hinged)  to look under it and check its integrity:

 

  1. Have you removed your mast step/tabernacle?
    1. Any tips or tricks to know?

 

What did you find?! 😉  

 

Thank you!

Sincerely;

Shannon Rae

Vancouver

1983 Hull #243: SHIIMTI  “House Where The Wind of Life is Breathed In”

(Ex-Amanti & Windbourne)

 

Attitude Determines Whether it is an Ordeal or an Adventure!

 

From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Morris London
Sent: December 24, 2020 9:02 PM
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Raising and lowering a mast singlehanded

 

Hi Jamie,

 

I also thank you for the videos.  I've been wanting the ability to step the mast singlehandedly for a long time.  I haven't constructed the bridles yet, but did install a hinge beneath the tabernacle last summer.  The reason I did this was also a comment I had on your set-up.  The reason you have to really tug on the downhaul to get it "over the top" is because at first the mast is not pivoting on the bolt, it's pivoting on the forward edge of the bottom of the mast.  As you point out in the video, this causes the whole mast to lift (or as you noted the bolt rises) because the fulcrum if a couple inches forward of the bolt.  The bridle is doing its best to hold the mast down at that point, and that's what you're working against.  Something has to give a little to get the mast over the top.  Either the bridle is stretching (not too easy if you're using Dyneema and tying it up tight), or you're stressing the arch.  My intention is to cut the bridle so the pivot point aligns with the bolt in the hinge, thus avoiding that situation.

 

Another solution was suggested by Bingham, who also described the difficulty starting the mast over without it in the sketchbook.  He suggested rounding up the forward portion of the foot of the mast.  That would then put the fulcrum of the mast at the bolt.  PSC actually offered this as an option at the time we bought the boat.  We didn't get it because I thought it better to have the full bearing surface when the stick was under load.

 

MLL

 


 

From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> on behalf of Jamie White <jamie@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2020 8:29 PM
To: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Raising and lowering a mast singlehanded

 

Hello Bennett - the length will depend on how one bends on the guys (either to a shackle on the chainplate - like I did or to the turnbuckle).  The most critical measurement is the height above the chainplate for the bearing surface of the bridle legs thimble to be in line with the mast tabernacle bolt.  I used a 4' length of 3/8" all thread and a spirit level.  I positioned the all thread on the tabernacle bolt and had a helper spot the outboard end and measure how high above the chainplate it was.

 

There is a very good description I wrote in the September 2020 Flicka Friends, issue no.71 - I believe it starts on page 58.  Here is a link to the issue

 

Hope this helps... it is a very simple and safe way to raise and lower your mast.

 

 


Re: Head choices

Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...>
 

PS: thank you so much Scott too for your details on your recent choice and why, and yes you are correct: pump out the bilge “exhaust out the rear”, or into the tank…

 

this is really helping as I have had the Nature’s Head on another boat,  and now…the Airhead seems a better choice…

 

Really appreciate the time everyone takes to explain and show (love the pics too!) as I am rather wordy normally but this little ship is all new and exciting (have had bigger boats, they are not as fun, lol) so I am making my lists and carefully doing one thing at a time, as it does not all have to be done today…!! 😉

 

Shannon Rae

SHIIMTI – “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In”

1983 Flicka 20 – Hull #243

201-2065 West 4th Avenue

Vancouver, BC V6J 1N3

604-805-8350

“…attitude determines if it is an ordeal or an adventure…”

 

From: <Flicka20@groups.io> on behalf of "Scott via groups.io" <wilsometer@...>
Reply-To: "Flicka20@groups.io" <Flicka20@groups.io>
Date: Sunday, January 17, 2021 at 9:45 PM
To: "Flicka20@groups.io" <Flicka20@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

 

Hi Shannon,

 

Here are my answers to your questions:

 

1) The holding tank is a ‘bin’ molded (or I should say moulded?) into the interior liner.  It is very similar (but much smaller) to the water tank beneath the quarter berth.  How it looks when you take the lid off (lexan instead of plywood on my newer Flicka) will depend on how well it is flushed out and/or how long the ’stuff’ in there has been allowed to dry.  Mine appeared more like flaked/dried cow patties, which is arguably preferable to fresher, wetter ‘material.'

 

2) I would absolutely encourage ripping it all out – and replacing with an ‘Air-Head’ (see below).

 

3) It sounds like your Flicka is set up with slightly different routing than mine, but I am familiar with the setup you describe.  If I understand correctly, you can either send the waste to the tank or flip the valve and pump out via the bilge pump (or use the deckplate plumbed directly to the bottom of the tank)  A friend’s Flicka had this very setup from the factory, and yes, it is just as gross as it sounds (and also risks clogging the manual bilge pump, which does not seem like a great solution.  PSC later moved (at least by 1989) to discharge through a 1-1/2” thru-hull mounted just aft of the battery shelf in the lazarette (and below the waterline).  As I am sure you are aware, most every desirable anchorage in BC waters is a ’no discharge zone,’  and ALL of Puget Sound in the U.S. is also designated the same, so direct discharge is not going to be a legal option for local sailing anyway.

 

I think I might have the perfect solution for you!  My home port (when my boat is in the water) is also in the PNW.  I found that the enclosed head has (very) limited capacity, and given that just about anywhere I could sail within a few days is strictly ’no discharge,’ I decided to look into alternatives.  We could debate the ethics of discharging in deeper water in spite of the legalities, but in my case, I wanted to have a system that would allow me to conform to the law.  In case you are wondering, ’type 2 MSD’ devices like the ‘Lectra San’ do not meet the requirements in Washington and some BC waters designated ’no discharge,’ so that was out.

 

At first, I considered a porta-potty, but that is fraught with the same limited holding capacity (and emptying porta-potties is verboten in many harbors/marinas), and can be VERY odiferous in certain conditions.  I then sailed on a friend’s boat with an ‘Air-Head’ composting toilet installed, and was super impressed.  Absolutely no odor, compact and lightweight, and in my friend’s case, only needed to be emptied once per season (and by then, the ’stuff’ had been reduced to a rather earthy looking loam).  Others I have talked to report the need to empty every three-weeks to a month while cruising aboard full-time (two people plus occasional guests).  Urine is diverted to a separate (front-mounted) tank for disposal at more frequent intervals.

 

As it happened, I met the owner of the ‘Air-Head’ company, and after a couple of years of peppering him with questions and ‘what-if’ scenarios, I gained the confidence that it might be possible to install and use in the Flicka.  I then found the following excellent account of a couple who had already done a  successful Flicka installation:

 

 

Their glowing report sold me, so I met Geoff (from Airhead) and bought a complete Air-Head setup.  I am in the midst of an extensive refit, so mine has not yet been tested, but the experience on my friend’s boat sold me.  I am going to depart from the installation chronicled above by trying the exhaust through the existing deck pump-out plate (with a custom screw-in ‘hood’) rather than drilling a new hole through the transom.

 

If you are not familiar with composting heads, it could sound just as gross (or more so) than a conventional marine head, but I have found that this is just not the case.  There is a bit of a learning curve and retraining process, but nothing extreme.  It is mostly about keeping an eye on moisture content, occasionally adding some coconut coir (carried as compressed  bricks and dissolved/added as needed), and for males, learning how to sit for #1 (which is already advisable on moving boats anyway).   Also, getting rid of all of that plumbing and freeing up the holding tank for additional storage has its own very own attraction.

 

As for selecting from the various manufacturers out there (AirHead, C Head, Nature’s Head, etc.), I prefer the AirHead over the Nature’s Head because the latter has a top section that tips back during opening rather than the lid that lifts straight up on the AirHead.  Tipping the lid back can require mounting further into the head compartment to avoid interference with the bulkhead behind the head.  The other deciding factor for me is that I wanted a unit that included a fan to maintain constant negative pressure within the solids tank (and vented outside).  This is especially helpful in cooler climates like the PNW, as these heads would perhaps more accurately be described as ‘desiccating’ heads than ‘composting,’  and too much moisture can lead to problems.  The fan on the Airhead draws only 0.08 amps, so almost negligible even when left on 24/7 (as is advised).  The absence of a fan on the ‘C-Head’ took that out of contention for me.

 

Anyway, best of luck with your system!  If you do decide to keep the marine head, you will want to replace the hoses at regular intervals (or suffer the inevitable bouquet)!

 

Scott

#392

 

 

 

 



On Jan 17, 2021, at 7:27 PM, Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...> wrote:

 

For those with an enclosed head:

  1. Dare I ask what the holding tank looks like if you take the plywood off…is it still just a molded area with a sealed lid?
  2. Am going to redo the hoses and…tempted to rip it all out (not fond of old heads and the smell overall) but just want to get her sailing soon and see how it all works!!!😉
  3. The “pump overboard” is through a y-selector in cockpit locker & use the bilge pump handle….is that not kinda gross?!  Eeek!!
    1. I have a pump out, have not opened/used it yet…and will put a filter on the vent…

 

Still so excited and can’t wait to get mast back on and head out sailing!!

 

Thank you!

Sincerely;

Shannon Rae

SHIIMTI: “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In…”

1983 #243

Vancouver

604-805-8350

 

Attitude Determines Whether it is an Ordeal or an Adventure!

 

 


Re: Groco thru hulls

Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...>
 


Hello!

Do you suggest changing, or have you changed, Groco thru hulls...I saw previous articles on this- and went to check/clean one and when water trickles in, and drips a bit after -heart starts pounding...fear starts to build...!!!
Plus , am I correct in saying:  parts are not plentiful...nor “fresh “?!

Tim I see you did yours?! Nice ones there!

Sincerely 
Shannon Rae
SHIIMTI - “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In”

On Jan 18, 2021, at 7:41 AM, Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:

 Here's the new through hull fittings I replaced last spring, I just duplicated what was there already, just new.

It's circled in red.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.



From: Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 7:14:13 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

Lou,
Any chance you'd have a pic of the T fitting or know what it is?  Also exactly where is it located?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 2:32 AM Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:
One last note about that install that was an added bonus.

The old marine toilet took seawater in from the engine cooling through hull fitting with a Tee on it running to the head. I left the end of that hose in place in the head with an on/off valve on it. Now, when I winterize the 1GM10, I remove the AirHead, place a bucket there with 1.5gal of the pink antifreeze and close the through hull water intake valve. The end of the hose goes into the bucket and the engine sucks it right up and through the seawater separator right into the engine.

I'll use the same flush system during the season to do a fresh water flush every so often after seawater usage.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.



From: Louis Backover <lou.backover@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 2:25:12 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io, "Scott via groups.io" <wilsometer=aol.com@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

There's an older AirHead install doc in the group library. I used this to decide it was the solution for me too. I haven't opened and cleaned the holding tank area yet but I am going to do that too. There's mention about that at the end of the AirHead install document too and how the owner gained some extra storage space.

The AirHead document is old and after talking with the AirHead owner by email he explained that the mounting brackets were since updated so I didn't even need the urine pot wedge underneath.

First time we used it it didn't go great, after I adjusted the amount of Choir and added enzymes no issues what so ever. I'd never go back.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

<Screenshot_20210118-104006_Facebook.jpg>


Re: Head choices

Shannon Rae <shannonrae.ca@...>
 

Thank you so much to all of you! I have been flip-flopping between  “should I rip it all out and replace it with a composting....or not” and now I will... as I want clean and eliminate  the thru hull and free up the connected bilge pump (yuck) 

-and using the deck pump out for fan vent - this is perfect !!! As who wants to cut a hole in the deck for anything!!!) I am going for it...
And if others poo-poo it (ha ha) it’s what I want and then ....

-battery can then go behind where holding tank was?!
 —-balance the 100lb outboard  - is this what some of you have done?!. 

Sincerely;
Shannon Rae
SHIIMTI - “House Where the Wind of Life is Breathed In”
1983 -Flicka 20 - #243

On Jan 18, 2021, at 7:41 AM, Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:

 Here's the new through hull fittings I replaced last spring, I just duplicated what was there already, just new.

It's circled in red.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.



From: Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 7:14:13 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

Lou,
Any chance you'd have a pic of the T fitting or know what it is?  Also exactly where is it located?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 2:32 AM Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:
One last note about that install that was an added bonus.

The old marine toilet took seawater in from the engine cooling through hull fitting with a Tee on it running to the head. I left the end of that hose in place in the head with an on/off valve on it. Now, when I winterize the 1GM10, I remove the AirHead, place a bucket there with 1.5gal of the pink antifreeze and close the through hull water intake valve. The end of the hose goes into the bucket and the engine sucks it right up and through the seawater separator right into the engine.

I'll use the same flush system during the season to do a fresh water flush every so often after seawater usage.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.



From: Louis Backover <lou.backover@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 2:25:12 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io, "Scott via groups.io" <wilsometer=aol.com@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

There's an older AirHead install doc in the group library. I used this to decide it was the solution for me too. I haven't opened and cleaned the holding tank area yet but I am going to do that too. There's mention about that at the end of the AirHead install document too and how the owner gained some extra storage space.

The AirHead document is old and after talking with the AirHead owner by email he explained that the mounting brackets were since updated so I didn't even need the urine pot wedge underneath.

First time we used it it didn't go great, after I adjusted the amount of Choir and added enzymes no issues what so ever. I'd never go back.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

<Screenshot_20210118-104006_Facebook.jpg>


Re: traveller rail

Steve
 

Great! Thanks Tim

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 04:28:18 PM CST, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:


No bother Steve.  (1) Yes the tubing goes all the way through the T-connectors.  What slides through the two aft T-connectors is the short crowned piece of the rail, not the bent pieces.  While it might be possible to use a straight rather than crowned piece there, I suspect it would be very tight given the angles coming in from the two corners. To get the T-connectors to slide onto that crowned section can be a bit tricky.  But if you grease them up it should work.  (2) The positioning of the aft stanchion bases was in part a result of just looking at photos of other pushpits on Flickas.  And it worked nicely with the length of the short run or extension of the hockey stick shaped pieces.  You don't want to cut those ends as they taper down so as to slide inside 1" tubing.   Also in putting the stanchion bases there they lined up well with the existing traveller rail.  (3) I would be very hesitant to try to build it out of straight or 90 degree angles.  My guess is that structurally it would be weaker and you would not be able to get the aft stanchion bases to line up properly with the forward ones.
The boat is covered up for the winter now.  Otherwise I'd go over there and take a few more pictures and some measurements.  

Tim

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 3:56 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
Hey Tim. I"m getting very close to pulling the trigger on ordering the stuff from Sailrite  to build a pushpit like yours but I have some more questions, if you don't mind be bothering you again.  (1)  Does the tubing go all the way thru the "T" connecters or is it have to be w separate pieces? (2) Why did you put the act stanchions in that place verses putting then at the very aft corners? (3) Do you thing you could build one without curved tubing... oust straight angles?

Thanks again.

steve davis

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 09:24:57 AM CST, Steve via groups.io <bulldogstevedavis=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Yeah. That helps a lot> Thanks for your time and feed back> Happy sails to ya

On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:23:29 PM CST, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:


Steve,

I'll try to answer your questions as best I can.  I'm sure there are others on this site who know much more about metal fabrication than me.  I try not to offer advice unless I really know what I'm talking about.  So I don't often give it.  But I'll tell you what I did and hopefully answer most of your questions.

Initially I intended to have a pushpit custom made.  But for reasons of cost and timing it didn't look like it was going to work, at least not this summer.  I had just finished building a dodger and dodger frame from kits from Sailrite.  Given the size of a dodger for a Flicka I had quite a bit of 1" stainless tubing left.  The frame kit from Sailrite comes with 2 long pieces of 1" stainless tubing bent to resemble hockey sticks and an additional one with a slight bow or crown to it.  I bought two more of the long hockey stick shaped pieces and had enough left over from building the dodger frame to pretty much construct the pushpit.  The leftover section from the crowned piece worked nicely for the aft portion of the rail.  I just needed to buy a little more stainless tubing, 4 stanchion bases, 4 T-connectors, and a couple of end caps.  I got them through Sailrite but they are readily available at lots of other places.  I often use Defender or Hamilton Marine for that sort of stuff.  

No bending on my part was involved.  The rail is not one continuous piece, but made up of 3 pieces connected at splines with rivets.  If you look carefully at the photo you can see the two connections on the aft section of the rail.  Some careful measuring and cutting was involved to get just the shape I wanted.  But the hardest part was getting access for the backing plates for the stanchion bases.  And there wasn't really any need to compensate for the angles where the bases are mounted.  I just factored that into the shape of the frame.

So far I'm pretty happy with it.  It seems very sturdy; no wiggle or wobble no matter how hard I tug, yank or pull.  Granted not a scientific test but compared, for example, to the factory supplied bow pulpit,  it's much sturdier.  It would easily support the kind of solar panel you're considering.  

Hope that helps some.

Tim

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 6:29 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
I like it. I have some questions.
1, Where did you get the fittings?
2. How did you compensate for the angles where the bases are mounted?
3. Is it strong enough to support a 22 pound solar panel?
4. How did you bend the pipe?
5.  do you think it feasible to build one out of galvanized or black pipe?

Good job. Thanks for the help.

Steve Davis
On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 03:34:58 PM CST, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:


Steve,

Here are a couple of pictures. I don’t have a side shot of the pushpit, but  I included one of Moon Shadow at anchor and you should be able to zoom in on it. 
Tim

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 2:47 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Tim. Will you send a pic of your pushpit?  I'm needing one and value your experience.
Thamks
Steve Davis

On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 07:14:20 PM CST, Carol Baker <caroljean848@...> wrote:



Hi Tim,
I am very interested in installing a traveller rail unit like yours in the picture.
Can you please send me the dimensions?  Is the 1” stainless an Outside Diameter tubing, thick wall?  Any tips?
Many thanks,
Carol Baker
Nika 
#263

On Sep 3, 2020, at 5:24 PM, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:

My Flicka came without a push pit (stern pulpit). Got some pricey quotes and long lead times. Fashioned one myself using frame materials from Sailrite and was a lot cheaper.  I had some 1” stainless steel tubing and just bought 2 of their pre-bent bows. 
<IMG_0126.jpeg>


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


Re: traveller rail

Tim Stapleton
 

No bother Steve.  (1) Yes the tubing goes all the way through the T-connectors.  What slides through the two aft T-connectors is the short crowned piece of the rail, not the bent pieces.  While it might be possible to use a straight rather than crowned piece there, I suspect it would be very tight given the angles coming in from the two corners. To get the T-connectors to slide onto that crowned section can be a bit tricky.  But if you grease them up it should work.  (2) The positioning of the aft stanchion bases was in part a result of just looking at photos of other pushpits on Flickas.  And it worked nicely with the length of the short run or extension of the hockey stick shaped pieces.  You don't want to cut those ends as they taper down so as to slide inside 1" tubing.   Also in putting the stanchion bases there they lined up well with the existing traveller rail.  (3) I would be very hesitant to try to build it out of straight or 90 degree angles.  My guess is that structurally it would be weaker and you would not be able to get the aft stanchion bases to line up properly with the forward ones.
The boat is covered up for the winter now.  Otherwise I'd go over there and take a few more pictures and some measurements.  

Tim


On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 3:56 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
Hey Tim. I"m getting very close to pulling the trigger on ordering the stuff from Sailrite  to build a pushpit like yours but I have some more questions, if you don't mind be bothering you again.  (1)  Does the tubing go all the way thru the "T" connecters or is it have to be w separate pieces? (2) Why did you put the act stanchions in that place verses putting then at the very aft corners? (3) Do you thing you could build one without curved tubing... oust straight angles?

Thanks again.

steve davis

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 09:24:57 AM CST, Steve via groups.io <bulldogstevedavis=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Yeah. That helps a lot> Thanks for your time and feed back> Happy sails to ya

On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:23:29 PM CST, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:


Steve,

I'll try to answer your questions as best I can.  I'm sure there are others on this site who know much more about metal fabrication than me.  I try not to offer advice unless I really know what I'm talking about.  So I don't often give it.  But I'll tell you what I did and hopefully answer most of your questions.

Initially I intended to have a pushpit custom made.  But for reasons of cost and timing it didn't look like it was going to work, at least not this summer.  I had just finished building a dodger and dodger frame from kits from Sailrite.  Given the size of a dodger for a Flicka I had quite a bit of 1" stainless tubing left.  The frame kit from Sailrite comes with 2 long pieces of 1" stainless tubing bent to resemble hockey sticks and an additional one with a slight bow or crown to it.  I bought two more of the long hockey stick shaped pieces and had enough left over from building the dodger frame to pretty much construct the pushpit.  The leftover section from the crowned piece worked nicely for the aft portion of the rail.  I just needed to buy a little more stainless tubing, 4 stanchion bases, 4 T-connectors, and a couple of end caps.  I got them through Sailrite but they are readily available at lots of other places.  I often use Defender or Hamilton Marine for that sort of stuff.  

No bending on my part was involved.  The rail is not one continuous piece, but made up of 3 pieces connected at splines with rivets.  If you look carefully at the photo you can see the two connections on the aft section of the rail.  Some careful measuring and cutting was involved to get just the shape I wanted.  But the hardest part was getting access for the backing plates for the stanchion bases.  And there wasn't really any need to compensate for the angles where the bases are mounted.  I just factored that into the shape of the frame.

So far I'm pretty happy with it.  It seems very sturdy; no wiggle or wobble no matter how hard I tug, yank or pull.  Granted not a scientific test but compared, for example, to the factory supplied bow pulpit,  it's much sturdier.  It would easily support the kind of solar panel you're considering.  

Hope that helps some.

Tim

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 6:29 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
I like it. I have some questions.
1, Where did you get the fittings?
2. How did you compensate for the angles where the bases are mounted?
3. Is it strong enough to support a 22 pound solar panel?
4. How did you bend the pipe?
5.  do you think it feasible to build one out of galvanized or black pipe?

Good job. Thanks for the help.

Steve Davis
On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 03:34:58 PM CST, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:


Steve,

Here are a couple of pictures. I don’t have a side shot of the pushpit, but  I included one of Moon Shadow at anchor and you should be able to zoom in on it. 
Tim

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 2:47 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Tim. Will you send a pic of your pushpit?  I'm needing one and value your experience.
Thamks
Steve Davis

On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 07:14:20 PM CST, Carol Baker <caroljean848@...> wrote:



Hi Tim,
I am very interested in installing a traveller rail unit like yours in the picture.
Can you please send me the dimensions?  Is the 1” stainless an Outside Diameter tubing, thick wall?  Any tips?
Many thanks,
Carol Baker
Nika 
#263

On Sep 3, 2020, at 5:24 PM, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:

My Flicka came without a push pit (stern pulpit). Got some pricey quotes and long lead times. Fashioned one myself using frame materials from Sailrite and was a lot cheaper.  I had some 1” stainless steel tubing and just bought 2 of their pre-bent bows. 
<IMG_0126.jpeg>


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


Re: traveller rail

Steve
 

Hey Tim. I"m getting very close to pulling the trigger on ordering the stuff from Sailrite  to build a pushpit like yours but I have some more questions, if you don't mind be bothering you again.  (1)  Does the tubing go all the way thru the "T" connecters or is it have to be w separate pieces? (2) Why did you put the act stanchions in that place verses putting then at the very aft corners? (3) Do you thing you could build one without curved tubing... oust straight angles?

Thanks again.

steve davis

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 09:24:57 AM CST, Steve via groups.io <bulldogstevedavis@...> wrote:


Yeah. That helps a lot> Thanks for your time and feed back> Happy sails to ya

On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:23:29 PM CST, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:


Steve,

I'll try to answer your questions as best I can.  I'm sure there are others on this site who know much more about metal fabrication than me.  I try not to offer advice unless I really know what I'm talking about.  So I don't often give it.  But I'll tell you what I did and hopefully answer most of your questions.

Initially I intended to have a pushpit custom made.  But for reasons of cost and timing it didn't look like it was going to work, at least not this summer.  I had just finished building a dodger and dodger frame from kits from Sailrite.  Given the size of a dodger for a Flicka I had quite a bit of 1" stainless tubing left.  The frame kit from Sailrite comes with 2 long pieces of 1" stainless tubing bent to resemble hockey sticks and an additional one with a slight bow or crown to it.  I bought two more of the long hockey stick shaped pieces and had enough left over from building the dodger frame to pretty much construct the pushpit.  The leftover section from the crowned piece worked nicely for the aft portion of the rail.  I just needed to buy a little more stainless tubing, 4 stanchion bases, 4 T-connectors, and a couple of end caps.  I got them through Sailrite but they are readily available at lots of other places.  I often use Defender or Hamilton Marine for that sort of stuff.  

No bending on my part was involved.  The rail is not one continuous piece, but made up of 3 pieces connected at splines with rivets.  If you look carefully at the photo you can see the two connections on the aft section of the rail.  Some careful measuring and cutting was involved to get just the shape I wanted.  But the hardest part was getting access for the backing plates for the stanchion bases.  And there wasn't really any need to compensate for the angles where the bases are mounted.  I just factored that into the shape of the frame.

So far I'm pretty happy with it.  It seems very sturdy; no wiggle or wobble no matter how hard I tug, yank or pull.  Granted not a scientific test but compared, for example, to the factory supplied bow pulpit,  it's much sturdier.  It would easily support the kind of solar panel you're considering.  

Hope that helps some.

Tim

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 6:29 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
I like it. I have some questions.
1, Where did you get the fittings?
2. How did you compensate for the angles where the bases are mounted?
3. Is it strong enough to support a 22 pound solar panel?
4. How did you bend the pipe?
5.  do you think it feasible to build one out of galvanized or black pipe?

Good job. Thanks for the help.

Steve Davis
On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 03:34:58 PM CST, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:


Steve,

Here are a couple of pictures. I don’t have a side shot of the pushpit, but  I included one of Moon Shadow at anchor and you should be able to zoom in on it. 
Tim

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 2:47 PM Steve via groups.io <BULLDOGSTEVEDAVIS=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Tim. Will you send a pic of your pushpit?  I'm needing one and value your experience.
Thamks
Steve Davis

On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 07:14:20 PM CST, Carol Baker <caroljean848@...> wrote:



Hi Tim,
I am very interested in installing a traveller rail unit like yours in the picture.
Can you please send me the dimensions?  Is the 1” stainless an Outside Diameter tubing, thick wall?  Any tips?
Many thanks,
Carol Baker
Nika 
#263

On Sep 3, 2020, at 5:24 PM, Tim Stapleton <svheron35@...> wrote:

My Flicka came without a push pit (stern pulpit). Got some pricey quotes and long lead times. Fashioned one myself using frame materials from Sailrite and was a lot cheaper.  I had some 1” stainless steel tubing and just bought 2 of their pre-bent bows. 
<IMG_0126.jpeg>


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


--
Tim Stapleton


Re: Head choices

Lou Backover
 

Here's the new through hull fittings I replaced last spring, I just duplicated what was there already, just new.

It's circled in red.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.



From: Antonio Martinez <middleriverstudio@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 7:14:13 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

Lou,
Any chance you'd have a pic of the T fitting or know what it is?  Also exactly where is it located?
thx
a

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 2:32 AM Lou Backover <lou.backover@...> wrote:
One last note about that install that was an added bonus.

The old marine toilet took seawater in from the engine cooling through hull fitting with a Tee on it running to the head. I left the end of that hose in place in the head with an on/off valve on it. Now, when I winterize the 1GM10, I remove the AirHead, place a bucket there with 1.5gal of the pink antifreeze and close the through hull water intake valve. The end of the hose goes into the bucket and the engine sucks it right up and through the seawater separator right into the engine.

I'll use the same flush system during the season to do a fresh water flush every so often after seawater usage.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

--
Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse my brevity and any typographic errors.



From: Louis Backover <lou.backover@...>
Sent: January 18, 2021 2:25:12 AM EST
To: Flicka20@groups.io, "Scott via groups.io" <wilsometer=aol.com@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Head choices

There's an older AirHead install doc in the group library. I used this to decide it was the solution for me too. I haven't opened and cleaned the holding tank area yet but I am going to do that too. There's mention about that at the end of the AirHead install document too and how the owner gained some extra storage space.

The AirHead document is old and after talking with the AirHead owner by email he explained that the mounting brackets were since updated so I didn't even need the urine pot wedge underneath.

First time we used it it didn't go great, after I adjusted the amount of Choir and added enzymes no issues what so ever. I'd never go back.


Best regards,

Lou Backover
m | 215.519.8327 • w | 215.551.1780

812 Lombard Street, Apt 28
Philadelphia, PA 19147

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