Date   

Re: Boarding ladders

Clint Lewis
 

MOTU still only has the single step as shown in a linked photo in this thread in an earlier post. I tried using it last trip from the water after cleaning the bottom--it was useless or maybe I just haven't learned the technique. I think the single step was used from a surfboard or dingy alongside the boat. Seems to me the easiest thing would be to have a rope type ladder you hang over the side when needed. You'd only forget to throw it over once!

Lew
s/v MOTU


On Sun, Feb 17, 2013 at 11:16 AM, Ivan Kadar <ivankadar@...> wrote:
 

I second Nick's, you need a step at least a foot below water, more is better. I have a folding ladder on the port side, and I use it to go into the water to swim. Even so it is in the water like that, it takes an effort to pull myself out of the water. Ivan, Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY



From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 10:22 AM
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Boarding ladders

 
Guys, I seriously recommend you have at least one step 12 inches underwater or else you won't be able to get back into the boat. Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
>
> The Lady Bird step layout makes a lot of sense to me. Thanks again
>
> --- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
> >
> > Thanks very much - exactly what I was looking for.
> >
> > --- In Flicka20@..., "sam_yoshimura88" wrote:
> > >
> > > Some pictures of Flickas from my blog:
> > >
> > > 1) #407 the Ladybird (in Japan):
> > >
> > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SNj85KBcbtI/AAAAAAAAAIM/1pSPTANC6Ts/s1600/Lady+Bird+Stern+View.JPG
> > >
> > > 2) A 1983 Flicka (also in Japan):
> > >
> > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/TEJXvy7rdwI/AAAAAAAADAc/rRNJVwTkoBk/s1600/Setouchi+flicka+joukadai+2009+09.jpg
> > >
> > > Along with the two steps on the rudder (shown in the above picture), one is set on the transom:
> > >
> > > http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-dIM8CMHyI/TynkN7Sx3YI/AAAAAAAAFQQ/9_k1Sr98dys/s1600/1983+Flicka+in+Japan+03.jpg
> > >
> > > 3) A 1982 Flicka (was in Connecticut in 2009):
> > >
> > > http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SjMrkQV959I/AAAAAAAABYA/ljDUTVBtwVw/s1600/1982+ct4.jpg
> > >
> > > 4) Nor'Star Flicka #20 the Motu has just one on the transom:
> > >
> > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/S_Fv25FsgII/AAAAAAAACtY/xhQj2epeuJI/s1600/Motu.jpg
> > >
> > > 5) Another Nor'Star Flicka the Munchkin has a sturdy SS platform:
> > >
> > > http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TqUv4CIQ6TE/Tvf1wpX6TLI/AAAAAAAAE2U/wphrlyL3AUU/s1600/PC243238.JPG
> > >
> > > Remember that the propeller aperture (if your Ficka has one) and the pintle and gudgeon near the waterline also can serve as steps when coming out of water.
> > >
> > > -sam, #295 Serenity
> > >
> > >
> > > --- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
> > >
> > > > I can't find examples of steps on rudder as has been previously mentioned- anyone try this successfully? Sailors sketchbook has examples of steps, but not placement specifics.
> > >
> >
>





Re: Deadlight installation

manzano1957
 

Been there and know what you mean, that's why I' instaling one in my NorStar Flicka. Kevin

----- Original Message -----
From: Nick D
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 12:08 PM
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Deadlight installation

 

I fully agree that a forward facing hatch would be great at anchor. Particularly at 3am when you just need that quick peek around so you can sleep better. Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., Tom Beall wrote:
>
> I had a small (maybe 8-9 inch light), forward facing, bronze, openable, port installed at the factory to match the side ports. I have enjoyed it greatly when in the cabin when sailing, anchored or in port.
> Tom Flicka20
>
> --- On Sun, 2/17/13, Nick D wrote:
>
> From: Nick D
> Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Deadlight installation
> To: Flicka20@...
> Date: Sunday, February 17, 2013, 10:31 AM
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>  
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> We just sit on a cushion to see over the cabin top. I think you should check the viewing angle of a forward port. You might just see the deck and bowsprit.
>
> Nick
>
>
>
> --- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
>
> >
>
> > I'm considering installing a ~12" window/deadlight in either my companionway slider, or on the forward cabin wall. Pros/cons opinions appreciated. I have some 1/2" acrylic (or it could be polycarbonate) i'll be using. I also found a nice bronze guard that will mount over it.
>
> >
>


Re: Boarding ladders

Ivan Kadar
 

I second Nick's, you need a step at least a foot below water, more is better. I have a folding ladder on the port side, and I use it to go into the water to swim. Even so it is in the water like that, it takes an effort to pull myself out of the water. Ivan, Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY



From: Nick D
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 10:22 AM
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Boarding ladders

 
Guys, I seriously recommend you have at least one step 12 inches underwater or else you won't be able to get back into the boat. Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
>
> The Lady Bird step layout makes a lot of sense to me. Thanks again
>
> --- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
> >
> > Thanks very much - exactly what I was looking for.
> >
> > --- In Flicka20@..., "sam_yoshimura88" wrote:
> > >
> > > Some pictures of Flickas from my blog:
> > >
> > > 1) #407 the Ladybird (in Japan):
> > >
> > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SNj85KBcbtI/AAAAAAAAAIM/1pSPTANC6Ts/s1600/Lady+Bird+Stern+View.JPG
> > >
> > > 2) A 1983 Flicka (also in Japan):
> > >
> > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/TEJXvy7rdwI/AAAAAAAADAc/rRNJVwTkoBk/s1600/Setouchi+flicka+joukadai+2009+09.jpg
> > >
> > > Along with the two steps on the rudder (shown in the above picture), one is set on the transom:
> > >
> > > http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-dIM8CMHyI/TynkN7Sx3YI/AAAAAAAAFQQ/9_k1Sr98dys/s1600/1983+Flicka+in+Japan+03.jpg
> > >
> > > 3) A 1982 Flicka (was in Connecticut in 2009):
> > >
> > > http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SjMrkQV959I/AAAAAAAABYA/ljDUTVBtwVw/s1600/1982+ct4.jpg
> > >
> > > 4) Nor'Star Flicka #20 the Motu has just one on the transom:
> > >
> > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/S_Fv25FsgII/AAAAAAAACtY/xhQj2epeuJI/s1600/Motu.jpg
> > >
> > > 5) Another Nor'Star Flicka the Munchkin has a sturdy SS platform:
> > >
> > > http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TqUv4CIQ6TE/Tvf1wpX6TLI/AAAAAAAAE2U/wphrlyL3AUU/s1600/PC243238.JPG
> > >
> > > Remember that the propeller aperture (if your Ficka has one) and the pintle and gudgeon near the waterline also can serve as steps when coming out of water.
> > >
> > > -sam, #295 Serenity
> > >
> > >
> > > --- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
> > >
> > > > I can't find examples of steps on rudder as has been previously mentioned- anyone try this successfully? Sailors sketchbook has examples of steps, but not placement specifics.
> > >
> >
>




Re: Dangerous cockpit bin lid. [1 Attachment]

Nick D
 

The danger of getting hurt by the hatch was one of the first things I noticed and fixed when I got my boat. I installed a hatch holding spring like the West Marine 4914750, page 549 in the 2013 catalog. Works for us. Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., Tom Beall <sbwye@...> wrote:

Very creative and well done.Has anyone tried a comercial door closure that will let the cover down slowly?
Tom, Flicka20#120

--- On Sat, 2/16/13, Ivan Kadar <ivankadar@...> wrote:

From: Ivan Kadar <ivankadar@...>
Subject: [Flicka20] Dangerous cockpit bin lid. [1 Attachment]
To: "Flicka20@..." <Flicka20@...>
Date: Saturday, February 16, 2013, 7:54 PM
















 









[Attachment(s) from Ivan Kadar included below]


Some time ago I read here that the cover of the cockpit bin fell and it cut off the finger of our fellow sailor. I built a little gadget which works well. Actually this was the first thing I built for Sans Souci, because I thought this cover is a dangerous thing after bumping my head several times. It's easy to make, although you would have to mount it directly to the boat. I have a stainless steel bar (I built long time ago) which is used for many purposes, one of which is to hold this catch.
Ivan- Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY


Re: Deadlight installation

Trevor Davis
 

Yeah, just from eye-balling it, my guess is it would be at least mostly blocked by sprit. Or a dink on foredeck! But i still like the idea- that bare forward cabin wall begs for a light.

--- In Flicka20@..., "Nick D" <sailvela@...> wrote:

We just sit on a cushion to see over the cabin top. I think you should check the viewing angle of a forward port. You might just see the deck and bowsprit.
Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@> wrote:

I'm considering installing a ~12" window/deadlight in either my companionway slider, or on the forward cabin wall. Pros/cons opinions appreciated. I have some 1/2" acrylic (or it could be polycarbonate) i'll be using. I also found a nice bronze guard that will mount over it.


Re: Deadlight installation

Nick D
 

I fully agree that a forward facing hatch would be great at anchor. Particularly at 3am when you just need that quick peek around so you can sleep better. Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., Tom Beall <sbwye@...> wrote:

I had a small (maybe 8-9 inch light), forward facing, bronze, openable, port installed at the factory to match the side ports. I have enjoyed it greatly when in the cabin when sailing, anchored or in port.
Tom Flicka20

--- On Sun, 2/17/13, Nick D <sailvela@...> wrote:

From: Nick D <sailvela@...>
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Deadlight installation
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Sunday, February 17, 2013, 10:31 AM
















 









We just sit on a cushion to see over the cabin top. I think you should check the viewing angle of a forward port. You might just see the deck and bowsprit.

Nick



--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:

I'm considering installing a ~12" window/deadlight in either my companionway slider, or on the forward cabin wall. Pros/cons opinions appreciated. I have some 1/2" acrylic (or it could be polycarbonate) i'll be using. I also found a nice bronze guard that will mount over it.


Re: chainplate bend angles

Fred C
 

Definitely helps.  I think it will be a good exercise to verify how close the originals are to the calculated values.  I appreciate the trig refresher - its been a long time.



From: Ivan Kadar
To: "Flicka20@..."
Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2013 3:33 PM
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] chainplate bend angles

 
Hi Fred:
I would ignore the measurements from the old chainplates, especially because the port and starboard are different. They should be the same.
I would make a good sketch of the mast, including the spreaders. There are different size masts for the Flicka, and also different points where the lowers are attached to the mast, so the best thing is to sketch YOUR mast, and measure the dimensions. Now I would extend the sketch of the mast from the foot to the level of the gunwale, (where the chainplate bend is). (this will add the cabin-top height and the curvature of the deck correction) .When making the sketch for the uppers, they do not go to the top, but to the spreaders, so that has to be sketched like that.
After it's done, calculate the angles using trigonometry.  Add side angle at gunwale.  (Side of the boat to vertical).

For example. (Your mast maybe different).
The drawing I used was for a 29.8 foot Marconi rigging. Most masts are shorter.
From the Flicka drawing: Foot to lowers's attaching point =13.7'
From foot to gunwale attaching point vertically = 2'
Total vertical = 15.7'

from centerline of boat to gunvale attaching point horizontally = 3.85'

arctangent (3.85/15.7) = 13.73 degrees.
Side angle at gunwale (measured on the boat with an angle gauge with level) = 4 degrees (Yours maybe different)

Total bending angle 17.77 , round up to 18 degrees. Not that critical.

The top:

Total vertical to spreader (same as for lower's attaching point) = 15.7'
Horizontal between the gunwale attaching point and the point below the outer end of the spreader = 1.05'
{3.85-2.8} the 2.8 being the corrected length of the 3' spreader

arctangent (1.07/15.7)=3.85 degrees.
Total angle 3.85+4= 7.85  Round up to 8 degrees.

When you give it out for bending, mark the angles very clearly, so they don't bend it something silly, like 90 degrees minus your angle.
Best to also give the shop a piece of aluminum or even a heavy wire to show the correct angle.

I hope this helps.

 -Ivan, Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY




From: fredc_fl
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2013 12:34 PM
Subject: [Flicka20] chainplate bend angles

 
I have lowered the mast and removed the chainplates in preparation of having new ones fabricated. I am hoping that someone may have information on the chainplate bends. After removing them I noticed that at least one of the forward lowers were deformed.

This what I measured:

Uppers: 14 degrees.
Aft lowers: 20 degrees.
Fore lowers: 27 degrees (port) and 16 degrees (starboard).

The boat is sloop rigged and I am hoping that someone may have information to verify these measurements especially for the fore lowers.

Thanks in advance.
Fred






Re: chainplate bend angles

Fred C
 

I appreciate your response and the advice.  Based on what you have written I will try to compare the forward lowers to those on one of the Flickas located nearby as there is more than a 10 degree difference between port and starboard.  That's good to know that the originals were "eyeballed" and not made to some spec.


From: pmcinerney69
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2013 11:31 AM
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: chainplate bend angles

 


--- In Flicka20@..., "fredc_fl" wrote:
>
> I have lowered the mast and removed the chainplates in preparation of having new ones fabricated. I am hoping that someone may have information on the chainplate bends. After removing them I noticed that at least one of the forward lowers were deformed.
>
> This what I measured:
>
> Uppers: 14 degrees.
> Aft lowers: 20 degrees.
> Fore lowers: 27 degrees (port) and 16 degrees (starboard).
>
> The boat is sloop rigged and I am hoping that someone may have information to verify these measurements especially for the fore lowers.
>
> Thanks in advance.
> Fred
>
I made new chainplates for my 1987 Flicka last year. Unfortunately I didn't write the angles down and I'm not at the boat right now but I can tell you this. The angles are not critical as long as they are within a few degrees of being right. Don't assume that the originals are correct and the reason that the angles of your chainplates differ isn't because they were carefully made that way. Each one was just bent until it looked about right to whoever did it. Pick an angle that looks right and make all of 'em the same. What's far more important is that the bend be in just the right place. Try to keep it close to the curve of the fiberglass, in other words, don't have the bend just under the hole for the shroud attachment. Also make sure that the SS steel has been pickled to remove any carbon contamination from files or drill bits, etc. Also, very inportant, copy the hole pattern from each old plate and mark the new one for that place. The old holes in the hull are not all exactly the same and you DON"T want to be enlarging holes. If you do it right each chainplate will fit exactly into the original position. Good luck.




Re: Dangerous cockpit bin lid. [1 Attachment]

sbwye
 

Very creative and well done.
Has anyone tried a comercial door closure that will let the cover down slowly?

Tom, Flicka20#120


--- On Sat, 2/16/13, Ivan Kadar wrote:

From: Ivan Kadar
Subject: [Flicka20] Dangerous cockpit bin lid. [1 Attachment]
To: "Flicka20@..." <Flicka20@...>
Date: Saturday, February 16, 2013, 7:54 PM

 

Some time ago I read here that the cover of the cockpit bin fell and it cut off the finger of our fellow sailor. I built a little gadget which works well. Actually this was the first thing I built for Sans Souci, because I thought this cover is a dangerous thing after bumping my head several times. It's easy to make, although you would have to mount it directly to the boat. I have a stainless steel bar (I built long time ago) which is used for many purposes, one of which is to hold this catch.
Ivan- Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY


Re: Deadlight installation

sbwye
 

I had a small (maybe 8-9 inch light), forward facing, bronze, openable, port installed at the factory to match the side ports. I have enjoyed it greatly when in the cabin when sailing, anchored or in port.

Tom Flicka20


--- On Sun, 2/17/13, Nick D wrote:

From: Nick D
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Deadlight installation
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Sunday, February 17, 2013, 10:31 AM

 

We just sit on a cushion to see over the cabin top. I think you should check the viewing angle of a forward port. You might just see the deck and bowsprit.
Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" wrote:
>
> I'm considering installing a ~12" window/deadlight in either my companionway slider, or on the forward cabin wall. Pros/cons opinions appreciated. I have some 1/2" acrylic (or it could be polycarbonate) i'll be using. I also found a nice bronze guard that will mount over it.
>


Re: Deadlight installation

Nick D
 

We just sit on a cushion to see over the cabin top. I think you should check the viewing angle of a forward port. You might just see the deck and bowsprit.
Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@...> wrote:

I'm considering installing a ~12" window/deadlight in either my companionway slider, or on the forward cabin wall. Pros/cons opinions appreciated. I have some 1/2" acrylic (or it could be polycarbonate) i'll be using. I also found a nice bronze guard that will mount over it.


Re: Boarding ladders

Nick D
 

Guys, I seriously recommend you have at least one step 12 inches underwater or else you won't be able to get back into the boat. Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@...> wrote:

The Lady Bird step layout makes a lot of sense to me. Thanks again

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@> wrote:

Thanks very much - exactly what I was looking for.

--- In Flicka20@..., "sam_yoshimura88" <sam_yoshimura88@> wrote:

Some pictures of Flickas from my blog:

1) #407 the Ladybird (in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SNj85KBcbtI/AAAAAAAAAIM/1pSPTANC6Ts/s1600/Lady+Bird+Stern+View.JPG

2) A 1983 Flicka (also in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/TEJXvy7rdwI/AAAAAAAADAc/rRNJVwTkoBk/s1600/Setouchi+flicka+joukadai+2009+09.jpg

Along with the two steps on the rudder (shown in the above picture), one is set on the transom:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-dIM8CMHyI/TynkN7Sx3YI/AAAAAAAAFQQ/9_k1Sr98dys/s1600/1983+Flicka+in+Japan+03.jpg

3) A 1982 Flicka (was in Connecticut in 2009):

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SjMrkQV959I/AAAAAAAABYA/ljDUTVBtwVw/s1600/1982+ct4.jpg

4) Nor'Star Flicka #20 the Motu has just one on the transom:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/S_Fv25FsgII/AAAAAAAACtY/xhQj2epeuJI/s1600/Motu.jpg

5) Another Nor'Star Flicka the Munchkin has a sturdy SS platform:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TqUv4CIQ6TE/Tvf1wpX6TLI/AAAAAAAAE2U/wphrlyL3AUU/s1600/PC243238.JPG

Remember that the propeller aperture (if your Ficka has one) and the pintle and gudgeon near the waterline also can serve as steps when coming out of water.

-sam, #295 Serenity


--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@> wrote:

I can't find examples of steps on rudder as has been previously mentioned- anyone try this successfully? Sailors sketchbook has examples of steps, but not placement specifics.


Dangerous cockpit bin lid.

Ivan Kadar
 

Some time ago I read here that the cover of the cockpit bin fell and it cut off the finger of our fellow sailor. I built a little gadget which works well. Actually this was the first thing I built for Sans Souci, because I thought this cover is a dangerous thing after bumping my head several times. It's easy to make, although you would have to mount it directly to the boat. I have a stainless steel bar (I built long time ago) which is used for many purposes, one of which is to hold this catch.
Ivan- Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY


Re: Quiet on the Flicka Discussion Group;masthead light

Ivan Kadar
 

Hello All:
Finally I got to take a picture of the Bebi special masthead light. The mast is down at an angle, when the mast is up the light is vertical. You can see the conversion from the originsl Perko light to the new Bebi unit. As of this writing it is working fine
Ivan



From: Ivan Kadar
To: "Flicka20@..."
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2012 10:18 PM
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Re: Quiet on the Flicka Discussion Group;masthead light

 
Hi Pete:
I looked at the Bebi website, and the 18 LED running light (Masina) draws a maximum of 0.120 Amps. I did not measure mine. The running lights on mine are the 18 led 240 degree standard unit, and the custom added on the stern side a 6 LED 120 degree set. So when anchoring I run both together. So I assume it will draw 0.18 amps, but again I did not measure it.
The reason I changed away from incandescent, because I checked the lights before launching, they were fine, but in the second week of the season the running light bulb burnt out. So I had no running light for the whole season, an aggravation I did not want to repeat. So twentieth century. The LED's suppose to last forever the way I use them.
Ivan


From: Peter Reiner
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2012 12:52 PM
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Re: Quiet on the Flicka Discussion Group;masthead light

 
Thanks Ivan,

Looks like the old light was a Perko like the one on my '79 Flicka. 

A couple of more q's if I can beg your patience:

How many amps does the Bebi draw, and why did you decide to replace the old light?

Cheers,

Pete

On Thu, Apr 26, 2012 at 12:42 AM, Ivan Kadar <ivankadar@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Ivan Kadar included below]
Hi Pete:
It was some years ago when I got the Bebi-electronics light. I used the bottom of the original masthead light, fabricated a plastic conversion piece and glued it to the bebi lamp. I try to enclose a picture. -Ivan


From: Peter Reiner <petereiner24@...>
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Sunday, April 22, 2012 1:34 PM
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Re: Quiet on the Flicka Discussion Group

 
Ivan,

Sounds intriguing. Where and how did you mount the anchor/steaming light?

Pete
s/v Lady Bug, Mamaroneck

On Sat, Apr 21, 2012 at 1:10 AM, Ivan Kadar <ivankadar@...> wrote:
 
Hi Trevor: The bebi-electronics website is worth reading whether you order one of their products or not.
In my case I wanted a mast light which is a steaming light and an anchor light combination. I have the green and red lights on my bow, which is just fine with me. So they took one of their standard design and modified it for me. It works just fine, powerful LED's.
What they do is,  take pvc plumbing components, drill holes into them, place the LED's in, connect it to the electronics, and encapsulate the whole thing. Lamps are not replaceable, at least not in my unit. They have guarantee, check that out too for what you are ordering. But they have a variety of products, maybe even LED/standard bulb assemblies. I didn't look recently at the website.
Check it carefully before you order how are you going to mount it and such. After I resolved the mounting, the end result was very good.
Ivan

From: williwa1 <pkiswee@...>
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Friday, April 20, 2012 2:26 AM

Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Quiet on the Flicka Discussion Group

 
Interesting options.

Ivan, what do you mean by custom built? In my case, I either need to replace the current Aquasignal type tricolor lamp with two new bulbs (looks like the OWL might fit the bill here, ~80$ for2xshipped), or replace my fixture completely with something else. I'm leaning toward replacing the fixture, as it fractured at the base and is mended with 5200.

Bill, I think I may have done some business with Boaterbits on ebay before. If I decide to replace my fixture with a similar new one- his price looks to be the best around. I'm not sure if I should do this though, as the one I have isn't particularly rugged. Any of the more rugged options I've found were upwards of 400-600$, a little too rich for my blood. Thanks for offering up the extra lamps- do you think they would fit my fixture?

Trevor
Flying Fish
Sterling, Alaska

--- In Flicka20@..., Ivan Kadar wrote:
>
> Hi Trevor: Look up bebi-electronics. com. I got my custom-built mast light from them at sensible cost. They are in Fiji, but the light came to Long Island New York, pretty fast. Made in a small hand-made operation. They work fine on my boat. -Ivan, Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: williwa1
> To: Flicka20@...
> Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2012 2:20 PM
> Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Quiet on the Flicka Discussion Group
>
>
>  
>
> Bill,
>
> What do you use for the masthead LED? I was looking to replace my broken masthead lamp and was shocked at some of the prices for the LED versions. I glued the old one back together, but I'm still open to upgrading if I don't have to take a 2nd mortgage to pay for one!
>
> Trevor
>
> --- In Flicka20@..., Bill Cartwright wrote:
> >
> > I am still working on my boat, I just finished installing the refer and a microwave and presently I am building a boom gallows along with installing dorades. Also I am in the process of striping the outer boat and putting down 2 coats of interlux 2000E water barrier, top and bottom. Already made a teak sole in the cockpit. Will update photos today. Added a small bronze round port on the bulkhead below the compass because I liked it plus more air circulation. Done with inside except a little wiring to laydown and the connecting of propane to the new refer. I installed five seacock valves in the boat, I have the GROCO SV Series on ebay for sale. They are brand new, never used, but are the old style with rubber plug and I wanted the ball valve. Done with the mast and I made it up as a cutter with removable baby stay along with LED masthead tri and anchor light along with strobe and LED spreader lights. I have been working nonstop since early
> December on
> > the boat and I am not sure it will be ready in June as I had planned. We shall see. I was able to order all the spares from England for the Petter built motor that Westerbeke sold here in the USA back in the 70's to 82. Fortunately the little bugger is still in production and doing well there. Since I am a die hard treckie, I decided to name the boat "Enterprise" based on the book and show," to go where no man has gone before and seek new civilizations".  Now that I have made a little noise, lets here it from the rest of you fellow sailors out there, whats going on in your world and what are you planning or doing to your boat and all.
> > Daryl thanks for reminding us to tune in and not turn off.
> > have a good one!
> >
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Daryl
> > To: Flicka20@...
> > Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2012 10:53 AM
> > Subject: [Flicka20] Quiet on the Flicka Discussion Group
> >
> >
> >
> >  
> >
> > This site is unusually quiet. How are the spring commissioning activities going. The ICE is off the Harbor at Barkers Island Marina on Lake Superior. I will be hauling Ballo Liscio from her winter storage facility, then doing some bright work and hopefull installing the rest of the Webast heater project - prior to launch.
> >
> > Daryl S/Y
> > Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433
> >
>












Re: chainplate bend angles

Ivan Kadar
 

Hi Fred:
I would ignore the measurements from the old chainplates, especially because the port and starboard are different. They should be the same.
I would make a good sketch of the mast, including the spreaders. There are different size masts for the Flicka, and also different points where the lowers are attached to the mast, so the best thing is to sketch YOUR mast, and measure the dimensions. Now I would extend the sketch of the mast from the foot to the level of the gunwale, (where the chainplate bend is). (this will add the cabin-top height and the curvature of the deck correction) .When making the sketch for the uppers, they do not go to the top, but to the spreaders, so that has to be sketched like that.
After it's done, calculate the angles using trigonometry.  Add side angle at gunwale.  (Side of the boat to vertical).

For example. (Your mast maybe different).
The drawing I used was for a 29.8 foot Marconi rigging. Most masts are shorter.
From the Flicka drawing: Foot to lowers's attaching point =13.7'
From foot to gunwale attaching point vertically = 2'
Total vertical = 15.7'

from centerline of boat to gunvale attaching point horizontally = 3.85'

arctangent (3.85/15.7) = 13.73 degrees.
Side angle at gunwale (measured on the boat with an angle gauge with level) = 4 degrees (Yours maybe different)

Total bending angle 17.77 , round up to 18 degrees. Not that critical.

The top:

Total vertical to spreader (same as for lower's attaching point) = 15.7'
Horizontal between the gunwale attaching point and the point below the outer end of the spreader = 1.05'
{3.85-2.8} the 2.8 being the corrected length of the 3' spreader

arctangent (1.07/15.7)=3.85 degrees.
Total angle 3.85+4= 7.85  Round up to 8 degrees.

When you give it out for bending, mark the angles very clearly, so they don't bend it something silly, like 90 degrees minus your angle.
Best to also give the shop a piece of aluminum or even a heavy wire to show the correct angle.

I hope this helps.

 -Ivan, Sans Souci on the LI  Sound NY




From: fredc_fl
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2013 12:34 PM
Subject: [Flicka20] chainplate bend angles

 
I have lowered the mast and removed the chainplates in preparation of having new ones fabricated. I am hoping that someone may have information on the chainplate bends. After removing them I noticed that at least one of the forward lowers were deformed.

This what I measured:

Uppers: 14 degrees.
Aft lowers: 20 degrees.
Fore lowers: 27 degrees (port) and 16 degrees (starboard).

The boat is sloop rigged and I am hoping that someone may have information to verify these measurements especially for the fore lowers.

Thanks in advance.
Fred




Re: chainplate bend angles

pmcinerney69
 

--- In Flicka20@..., "fredc_fl" <fredg47@...> wrote:

I have lowered the mast and removed the chainplates in preparation of having new ones fabricated. I am hoping that someone may have information on the chainplate bends. After removing them I noticed that at least one of the forward lowers were deformed.

This what I measured:

Uppers: 14 degrees.
Aft lowers: 20 degrees.
Fore lowers: 27 degrees (port) and 16 degrees (starboard).

The boat is sloop rigged and I am hoping that someone may have information to verify these measurements especially for the fore lowers.

Thanks in advance.
Fred
I made new chainplates for my 1987 Flicka last year. Unfortunately I didn't write the angles down and I'm not at the boat right now but I can tell you this. The angles are not critical as long as they are within a few degrees of being right. Don't assume that the originals are correct and the reason that the angles of your chainplates differ isn't because they were carefully made that way. Each one was just bent until it looked about right to whoever did it. Pick an angle that looks right and make all of 'em the same. What's far more important is that the bend be in just the right place. Try to keep it close to the curve of the fiberglass, in other words, don't have the bend just under the hole for the shroud attachment. Also make sure that the SS steel has been pickled to remove any carbon contamination from files or drill bits, etc. Also, very inportant, copy the hole pattern from each old plate and mark the new one for that place. The old holes in the hull are not all exactly the same and you DON"T want to be enlarging holes. If you do it right each chainplate will fit exactly into the original position. Good luck.


Re: Zinks

sam_yoshimura88
 

We had changed the engine block zinc in our 1GM10 every year for several years, though 3/4 of it still remained in good shape. Now we change it every other year - yet a half of it is still good.

Since the zinc is not expensive at all, it is a good practice to get it changed at least once every two years, no matter how much of it is still left to be consumed.

Btw, we run our 1GM10 almost every weekend year around.

-sam, #295 Serenity (San Francisco Bay where the seawater is cold...)

PS It is sometimes hard to get the paper gasket off the engine block. We apply a coat of silicon grease to the gasket when we put in a new one. That makes the job a lot easier.

--- In Flicka20@..., "edhunnicutt254" <EdHunnicut@...> wrote:

I have a 1982 Flicka20 w/a Yanmar diesel. I am new to sailing and Flicka20 maintenance. I need to know how often zinks typically need to be replaced in SW Fl. waters.


Re: Boarding ladders

Trevor Davis
 

The Lady Bird step layout makes a lot of sense to me. Thanks again

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@...> wrote:

Thanks very much - exactly what I was looking for.

--- In Flicka20@..., "sam_yoshimura88" <sam_yoshimura88@> wrote:

Some pictures of Flickas from my blog:

1) #407 the Ladybird (in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SNj85KBcbtI/AAAAAAAAAIM/1pSPTANC6Ts/s1600/Lady+Bird+Stern+View.JPG

2) A 1983 Flicka (also in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/TEJXvy7rdwI/AAAAAAAADAc/rRNJVwTkoBk/s1600/Setouchi+flicka+joukadai+2009+09.jpg

Along with the two steps on the rudder (shown in the above picture), one is set on the transom:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-dIM8CMHyI/TynkN7Sx3YI/AAAAAAAAFQQ/9_k1Sr98dys/s1600/1983+Flicka+in+Japan+03.jpg

3) A 1982 Flicka (was in Connecticut in 2009):

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SjMrkQV959I/AAAAAAAABYA/ljDUTVBtwVw/s1600/1982+ct4.jpg

4) Nor'Star Flicka #20 the Motu has just one on the transom:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/S_Fv25FsgII/AAAAAAAACtY/xhQj2epeuJI/s1600/Motu.jpg

5) Another Nor'Star Flicka the Munchkin has a sturdy SS platform:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TqUv4CIQ6TE/Tvf1wpX6TLI/AAAAAAAAE2U/wphrlyL3AUU/s1600/PC243238.JPG

Remember that the propeller aperture (if your Ficka has one) and the pintle and gudgeon near the waterline also can serve as steps when coming out of water.

-sam, #295 Serenity


--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@> wrote:

I can't find examples of steps on rudder as has been previously mentioned- anyone try this successfully? Sailors sketchbook has examples of steps, but not placement specifics.


Re: Boarding ladders

Trevor Davis
 

Thanks very much - exactly what I was looking for.

--- In Flicka20@..., "sam_yoshimura88" <sam_yoshimura88@...> wrote:

Some pictures of Flickas from my blog:

1) #407 the Ladybird (in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SNj85KBcbtI/AAAAAAAAAIM/1pSPTANC6Ts/s1600/Lady+Bird+Stern+View.JPG

2) A 1983 Flicka (also in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/TEJXvy7rdwI/AAAAAAAADAc/rRNJVwTkoBk/s1600/Setouchi+flicka+joukadai+2009+09.jpg

Along with the two steps on the rudder (shown in the above picture), one is set on the transom:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-dIM8CMHyI/TynkN7Sx3YI/AAAAAAAAFQQ/9_k1Sr98dys/s1600/1983+Flicka+in+Japan+03.jpg

3) A 1982 Flicka (was in Connecticut in 2009):

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SjMrkQV959I/AAAAAAAABYA/ljDUTVBtwVw/s1600/1982+ct4.jpg

4) Nor'Star Flicka #20 the Motu has just one on the transom:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/S_Fv25FsgII/AAAAAAAACtY/xhQj2epeuJI/s1600/Motu.jpg

5) Another Nor'Star Flicka the Munchkin has a sturdy SS platform:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TqUv4CIQ6TE/Tvf1wpX6TLI/AAAAAAAAE2U/wphrlyL3AUU/s1600/PC243238.JPG

Remember that the propeller aperture (if your Ficka has one) and the pintle and gudgeon near the waterline also can serve as steps when coming out of water.

-sam, #295 Serenity


--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@> wrote:

I can't find examples of steps on rudder as has been previously mentioned- anyone try this successfully? Sailors sketchbook has examples of steps, but not placement specifics.


Re: Boarding ladders

sam_yoshimura88
 

Some pictures of Flickas from my blog:

1) #407 the Ladybird (in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SNj85KBcbtI/AAAAAAAAAIM/1pSPTANC6Ts/s1600/Lady+Bird+Stern+View.JPG

2) A 1983 Flicka (also in Japan):

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/TEJXvy7rdwI/AAAAAAAADAc/rRNJVwTkoBk/s1600/Setouchi+flicka+joukadai+2009+09.jpg

Along with the two steps on the rudder (shown in the above picture), one is set on the transom:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0-dIM8CMHyI/TynkN7Sx3YI/AAAAAAAAFQQ/9_k1Sr98dys/s1600/1983+Flicka+in+Japan+03.jpg

3) A 1982 Flicka (was in Connecticut in 2009):

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/SjMrkQV959I/AAAAAAAABYA/ljDUTVBtwVw/s1600/1982+ct4.jpg

4) Nor'Star Flicka #20 the Motu has just one on the transom:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xGsX-xHakfM/S_Fv25FsgII/AAAAAAAACtY/xhQj2epeuJI/s1600/Motu.jpg

5) Another Nor'Star Flicka the Munchkin has a sturdy SS platform:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TqUv4CIQ6TE/Tvf1wpX6TLI/AAAAAAAAE2U/wphrlyL3AUU/s1600/PC243238.JPG

Remember that the propeller aperture (if your Ficka has one) and the pintle and gudgeon near the waterline also can serve as steps when coming out of water.

-sam, #295 Serenity

--- In Flicka20@..., "williwa1" <pkiswee@...> wrote:

I can't find examples of steps on rudder as has been previously mentioned- anyone try this successfully? Sailors sketchbook has examples of steps, but not placement specifics.

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