Date   

Re: Hurricane Irene

Daryl Clark
 

Just got a message from Boat US today. If you haul your boat, take the mast down and try to keep your boat as far away from other boats as possible. Stake the trailer down if possible. If possible, I would haul the boat further inland if you have time.

Good luck.

Daryl

--- In Flicka20@..., "Nick D" <sailvela@...> wrote:

We are within 30 miles of the track of Irene in Amityville Long Island NY. Spending a few days of strategizing how protect my home and the boat and realized that if I stayed near the boat I could be cut off from the house by water and perhaps lose my truck in the process. So, we just got back from the boatyard where the boat was hauled a few hours ago. Feeling a lot better now and able to focus on the home which is essentially just 2 miles from the ocean, less than 1 mile from the Great South Bay. I would say the boat is still at risk on its trailer in the boatyard but I know I've done everything possible. Hope everyone else at risk is taking action.


Hurricane Irene and a cradle for your Flicka?

flickafriends <tom@...>
 

For those of you without a trailer and are in the path of IRENE, building a cradle would be a way to get your Flicka out of the water.

There was an article about the factory Flicka cradle in Flicka Friends
in the past that could be built for $200 or so. There is a list of the wood required to build one.

Just keep in mind that the width of this cradle. Additional base width would be prudent in the expected winds.

I know that time is short, but this might provide another option.

The article is in the Summer 2006 issue of Flicka Friends (Vol 11, # 2), page 10-11.

Best of luck!


Hurricane Irene

Nick D
 

We are within 30 miles of the track of Irene in Amityville Long Island NY. Spending a few days of strategizing how protect my home and the boat and realized that if I stayed near the boat I could be cut off from the house by water and perhaps lose my truck in the process. So, we just got back from the boatyard where the boat was hauled a few hours ago. Feeling a lot better now and able to focus on the home which is essentially just 2 miles from the ocean, less than 1 mile from the Great South Bay. I would say the boat is still at risk on its trailer in the boatyard but I know I've done everything possible. Hope everyone else at risk is taking action.


Flicka Friends Newsletter

Daryl Clark
 

I received an email from Dennis Pratt, the original Flicka Newsletter Editor. He now owns and has refurbished a 1979 Flicka. Previously the Flicka was named Valentine. He now sails in Washington!

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433


Re: Marine Head - filling with water

Robert Collier
 

Gus---I did misunderstand your setup---whew!  Also, I went back to your other email and read  your link to Don Casey's instructions.   It wasn't until I couldn't get very much water to flow into the bowl that I checked the Wilcox-Crittenden's instructions (typical DIYer "when all else fails, read the instructions").  Thank you for the info and Casey's diagrams.
Bob


--- On Thu, 8/25/11, angusbeare2002 wrote:

From: angusbeare2002
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Thursday, August 25, 2011, 4:25 AM

 
Hi Bob

I think I may not have been clear. I had the problem "before" I fitted the vented loop between the bowl and the pump.

If you read Don Casey on the link I posted he points out that this setup depends on the pump being in good order. So, ideally, shut the main sea cock when you're not on board. And shut the smaller inline sea cock by the toilet when you're not using it. Also overhaul the pump every season and replace it when it's worn.

Gus

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier wrote:
>
> Gus and all interested---I've been mulling over what you said about finding a full bowl of water even with a vented loop installed.  When I changed the postion of my vented loop from inlet hose, that is, from the thru-hull to the pump, to a position in the hose from the pump to the bowl, I thought this would cure the problem.  But if Gus found water in a previously dry bowl with a vented loop in the same position as mine with an open thru-hull, I'm concerned.  It would seem that shouldn't happen even if the inlet valve to the pump is faulty or leaking or if the spring in the foot lever (on a Wilcox-Crittenden type toilet) broke, thus allowing the foot pedal to stay in the down and open valve position---the vented loop between the pump and bowl should stop any water going to the bowl.  Hmmmm?  I hope I won't found out the answer the hard way (maybe the answer is to just provide a bucket and throw the contents overboard when it's full!)---Bob (Red
> Rascal) 
>
> --- On Wed, 8/24/11, Daryl wrote:
>
>
> From: Daryl
> Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Marine Head - filling with water
> To: Flicka20@...
> Date: Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 9:37 AM
>
>
>  
>
>
>
> I am going to check out the vented loop when I go to the boat this weekend. Seems like a logical place to start. Bottom line: the seacock for the head is off when not in use to flush the toilet!
>
> Daryl
> S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433
>
> --- In Flicka20@..., "angusbeare2002" wrote:
> >
> > I fitted a vented loop as Bob did. I never had a problem when I was on board all the time but I left the sea cock open once recently and came back to a full bowl.
> >
> > this might help:
> >
> > http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/13.htm
> >
> > --- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Daryl---The first question is easy to answer, the inlet line for the toilet began to siphon water to the toilet bowl and evntually overflow and could have sunk the boat.  One answer, not one I'd recommend from personal experience, is to install a vented loop between the seacock and the head.  It will solve the problem of an accidentally opened seacock, for the venting stops the siphoning.  However, I did just that on the recommendation of West Marine's catalogue. But I could only get a small amount of water to enter the bowl (it was the same as trying to sip a soda through a straw with a hole in the straw, no suction).  So now I have a vented loop between the pump and the entry to the bowl because you can push fluids past a vented loop but not suction fluids past the loop. I'm told this is the correct way to go, hopefully I'll not find out otherwise.
> > >    As to the second question, you must have an automatic bilge pump that was activated, because I don't know of any toilet that has a hose to the bilge (sounds smelly).
> > > Bob (Red Rascal)
> > > --- On Wed, 8/17/11, Daryl wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > > From: Daryl <dlclark@>
> > > Subject: [Flicka20] Marine Head - filling with water
> > > To: Flicka20@...
> > > Date: Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:37 AM
> > >
> > >
> > >  
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
> > > Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.
> > >
> > > What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.
> > >
> > > So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:
> > >
> > > 1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...
> > >
> > > 2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?
> > >
> > > We did pump the head on returning to the marina...
> > >
> > > Daryl
> > > S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433
> > >
> >
>


Re: Marine Head - filling with water

Angus Beare
 

Hi Bob

I think I may not have been clear. I had the problem "before" I fitted the vented loop between the bowl and the pump.

If you read Don Casey on the link I posted he points out that this setup depends on the pump being in good order. So, ideally, shut the main sea cock when you're not on board. And shut the smaller inline sea cock by the toilet when you're not using it. Also overhaul the pump every season and replace it when it's worn.

Gus

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier <rhcmkc1@...> wrote:

Gus and all interested---I've been mulling over what you said about finding a full bowl of water even with a vented loop installed.  When I changed the postion of my vented loop from inlet hose, that is, from the thru-hull to the pump, to a position in the hose from the pump to the bowl, I thought this would cure the problem.  But if Gus found water in a previously dry bowl with a vented loop in the same position as mine with an open thru-hull, I'm concerned.  It would seem that shouldn't happen even if the inlet valve to the pump is faulty or leaking or if the spring in the foot lever (on a Wilcox-Crittenden type toilet) broke, thus allowing the foot pedal to stay in the down and open valve position---the vented loop between the pump and bowl should stop any water going to the bowl.  Hmmmm?  I hope I won't found out the answer the hard way (maybe the answer is to just provide a bucket and throw the contents overboard when it's full!)---Bob (Red
Rascal) 

--- On Wed, 8/24/11, Daryl <dlclark@...> wrote:


From: Daryl <dlclark@...>
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 9:37 AM


 



I am going to check out the vented loop when I go to the boat this weekend. Seems like a logical place to start. Bottom line: the seacock for the head is off when not in use to flush the toilet!

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433

--- In Flicka20@..., "angusbeare2002" <gus@> wrote:

I fitted a vented loop as Bob did. I never had a problem when I was on board all the time but I left the sea cock open once recently and came back to a full bowl.

this might help:

http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/13.htm

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier <rhcmkc1@> wrote:






Daryl---The first question is easy to answer, the inlet line for the toilet began to siphon water to the toilet bowl and evntually overflow and could have sunk the boat.  One answer, not one I'd recommend from personal experience, is to install a vented loop between the seacock and the head.  It will solve the problem of an accidentally opened seacock, for the venting stops the siphoning.  However, I did just that on the recommendation of West Marine's catalogue. But I could only get a small amount of water to enter the bowl (it was the same as trying to sip a soda through a straw with a hole in the straw, no suction).  So now I have a vented loop between the pump and the entry to the bowl because you can push fluids past a vented loop but not suction fluids past the loop. I'm told this is the correct way to go, hopefully I'll not find out otherwise.
   As to the second question, you must have an automatic bilge pump that was activated, because I don't know of any toilet that has a hose to the bilge (sounds smelly).
Bob (Red Rascal)
--- On Wed, 8/17/11, Daryl <dlclark@> wrote:


From: Daryl <dlclark@>
Subject: [Flicka20] Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:37 AM


 



Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.

What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.

So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:

1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...

2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?

We did pump the head on returning to the marina...

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433


Re: Marine Head - filling with water

Nick D
 

I had the same experience with bowl filling mysteriously even with the intake closed. I reasoned that it was back filling from the vertical section exhaust side of the system. After some tinkering, I think the system needs to be used a little each season before it starts working right. The valve may be a little dry and stiff, maybe with some dried debris that just need to get worked out because it works fine now and although I wish I could claim to be a brilliant mechanic, I didn't do much at all. Nick

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier <rhcmkc1@...> wrote:

Gus and all interested---I've been mulling over what you said about finding a full bowl of water even with a vented loop installed.  When I changed the postion of my vented loop from inlet hose, that is, from the thru-hull to the pump, to a position in the hose from the pump to the bowl, I thought this would cure the problem.  But if Gus found water in a previously dry bowl with a vented loop in the same position as mine with an open thru-hull, I'm concerned.  It would seem that shouldn't happen even if the inlet valve to the pump is faulty or leaking or if the spring in the foot lever (on a Wilcox-Crittenden type toilet) broke, thus allowing the foot pedal to stay in the down and open valve position---the vented loop between the pump and bowl should stop any water going to the bowl.  Hmmmm?  I hope I won't found out the answer the hard way (maybe the answer is to just provide a bucket and throw the contents overboard when it's full!)---Bob (Red
Rascal) 

--- On Wed, 8/24/11, Daryl <dlclark@...> wrote:


From: Daryl <dlclark@...>
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 9:37 AM


 



I am going to check out the vented loop when I go to the boat this weekend. Seems like a logical place to start. Bottom line: the seacock for the head is off when not in use to flush the toilet!

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433

--- In Flicka20@..., "angusbeare2002" <gus@> wrote:

I fitted a vented loop as Bob did. I never had a problem when I was on board all the time but I left the sea cock open once recently and came back to a full bowl.

this might help:

http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/13.htm

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier <rhcmkc1@> wrote:






Daryl---The first question is easy to answer, the inlet line for the toilet began to siphon water to the toilet bowl and evntually overflow and could have sunk the boat.  One answer, not one I'd recommend from personal experience, is to install a vented loop between the seacock and the head.  It will solve the problem of an accidentally opened seacock, for the venting stops the siphoning.  However, I did just that on the recommendation of West Marine's catalogue. But I could only get a small amount of water to enter the bowl (it was the same as trying to sip a soda through a straw with a hole in the straw, no suction).  So now I have a vented loop between the pump and the entry to the bowl because you can push fluids past a vented loop but not suction fluids past the loop. I'm told this is the correct way to go, hopefully I'll not find out otherwise.
   As to the second question, you must have an automatic bilge pump that was activated, because I don't know of any toilet that has a hose to the bilge (sounds smelly).
Bob (Red Rascal)
--- On Wed, 8/17/11, Daryl <dlclark@> wrote:


From: Daryl <dlclark@>
Subject: [Flicka20] Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:37 AM


 



Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.

What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.

So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:

1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...

2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?

We did pump the head on returning to the marina...

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433


Re: Marine Head - filling with water

Robert Collier
 

Gus and all interested---I've been mulling over what you said about finding a full bowl of water even with a vented loop installed.  When I changed the postion of my vented loop from inlet hose, that is, from the thru-hull to the pump, to a position in the hose from the pump to the bowl, I thought this would cure the problem.  But if Gus found water in a previously dry bowl with a vented loop in the same position as mine with an open thru-hull, I'm concerned.  It would seem that shouldn't happen even if the inlet valve to the pump is faulty or leaking or if the spring in the foot lever (on a Wilcox-Crittenden type toilet) broke, thus allowing the foot pedal to stay in the down and open valve position---the vented loop between the pump and bowl should stop any water going to the bowl.  Hmmmm?  I hope I won't found out the answer the hard way (maybe the answer is to just provide a bucket and throw the contents overboard when it's full!)---Bob (Red Rascal) 


--- On Wed, 8/24/11, Daryl wrote:

From: Daryl
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 9:37 AM

 
I am going to check out the vented loop when I go to the boat this weekend. Seems like a logical place to start. Bottom line: the seacock for the head is off when not in use to flush the toilet!

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433

--- In Flicka20@..., "angusbeare2002" wrote:
>
> I fitted a vented loop as Bob did. I never had a problem when I was on board all the time but I left the sea cock open once recently and came back to a full bowl.
>
> this might help:
>
> http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/13.htm
>
> --- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier > >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Daryl---The first question is easy to answer, the inlet line for the toilet began to siphon water to the toilet bowl and evntually overflow and could have sunk the boat.  One answer, not one I'd recommend from personal experience, is to install a vented loop between the seacock and the head.  It will solve the problem of an accidentally opened seacock, for the venting stops the siphoning.  However, I did just that on the recommendation of West Marine's catalogue. But I could only get a small amount of water to enter the bowl (it was the same as trying to sip a soda through a straw with a hole in the straw, no suction).  So now I have a vented loop between the pump and the entry to the bowl because you can push fluids past a vented loop but not suction fluids past the loop. I'm told this is the correct way to go, hopefully I'll not find out otherwise.
> >    As to the second question, you must have an automatic bilge pump that was activated, because I don't know of any toilet that has a hose to the bilge (sounds smelly).
> > Bob (Red Rascal)
> > --- On Wed, 8/17/11, Daryl wrote:
> >
> >
> > From: Daryl
> > Subject: [Flicka20] Marine Head - filling with water
> > To: Flicka20@...
> > Date: Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:37 AM
> >
> >
> >  
> >
> >
> >
> > Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
> > Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.
> >
> > What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.
> >
> > So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:
> >
> > 1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...
> >
> > 2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?
> >
> > We did pump the head on returning to the marina...
> >
> > Daryl
> > S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433
> >
>


Re: Marine Head - filling with water

Daryl Clark
 

I am going to check out the vented loop when I go to the boat this weekend. Seems like a logical place to start. Bottom line: the seacock for the head is off when not in use to flush the toilet!

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433

--- In Flicka20@..., "angusbeare2002" <gus@...> wrote:

I fitted a vented loop as Bob did. I never had a problem when I was on board all the time but I left the sea cock open once recently and came back to a full bowl.

this might help:

http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/13.htm

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier <rhcmkc1@> wrote:






Daryl---The first question is easy to answer, the inlet line for the toilet began to siphon water to the toilet bowl and evntually overflow and could have sunk the boat.  One answer, not one I'd recommend from personal experience, is to install a vented loop between the seacock and the head.  It will solve the problem of an accidentally opened seacock, for the venting stops the siphoning.  However, I did just that on the recommendation of West Marine's catalogue. But I could only get a small amount of water to enter the bowl (it was the same as trying to sip a soda through a straw with a hole in the straw, no suction).  So now I have a vented loop between the pump and the entry to the bowl because you can push fluids past a vented loop but not suction fluids past the loop. I'm told this is the correct way to go, hopefully I'll not find out otherwise.
   As to the second question, you must have an automatic bilge pump that was activated, because I don't know of any toilet that has a hose to the bilge (sounds smelly).
Bob (Red Rascal)
--- On Wed, 8/17/11, Daryl <dlclark@> wrote:


From: Daryl <dlclark@>
Subject: [Flicka20] Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:37 AM


 



Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.

What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.

So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:

1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...

2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?

We did pump the head on returning to the marina...

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433


Re: Bit of a puzzle

Daryl Clark
 

I believe a right hand prop turns to port in reverse...

Here is the synopsis from Wiki-pedia:

Propeller walk is the term for a propeller's tendency to rotate a boat as well as accelerating it forwards or backwards.

A right-handed propeller (which rotates clockwise [as viewed from the stern] when in forward gear) will tend to push the stern of the boat to starboard. When in reverse gear, the effect will be much greater and opposite. A right-handed propeller will now push the aft of the boat to port.

Knowing of and understanding propeller walk is important when maneuvering in small spaces. It can be used to one's advantage while mooring off, or it can complicate a maneuver if the effect works against the pilot.

Propeller walk is a complicated effect which depends on ship geometry, direction of travel, propeller direction, vessel speed and depth of water. Three causes are identified for a vessel in deep water:-

Upward oblique flow at the propeller location.
Vertical wake distribution at the propeller.
Unbalanced lateral forces on the rudder (when set amidships) arising from the propeller slipstream impinging on the rudder blade.
The first of these results from there being a measurable difference in speed of water flowing close to the hull and that at lower depths which has not been affected by the vessel's motion. At low speeds the last effect is most pronounced and when going astern has even more influence.

In shallow water the upwards flow from under the vessel becomes much less strong and ultimately disappears. Model tests carried out show that, at a very small underkeel clearance, screw bias caused a ship to sheer to starboard (rather than port) when moving ahead and that there is an intermediate depth where the sheer from bias is neither one thing nor the other.

Finally, when moving ahead with the propeller moving astern, flow into and around the propeller is very confused. Generally the overall result for a single screw ship when stopping is a sheer to starboard, but this is not always guaranteed; sometimes it may go the other way, depending often on any yaw rate on the vessel when the propeller starts to turn astern.




Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433

--- In Flicka20@..., "pmcinerney69" <pmcinerney69@...> wrote:

My Flicka has the usual inboard Yanmar and the usual two blade right hand prop. One would expect that this would tend to turn the boat to port going forward but in fact it turns the boat to starboard. What about your experience?
nial


Bit of a puzzle

pmcinerney69
 

My Flicka has the usual inboard Yanmar and the usual two blade right hand prop. One would expect that this would tend to turn the boat to port going forward but in fact it turns the boat to starboard. What about your experience?
nial


Re: Marine Head - filling with water

Angus Beare
 

I fitted a vented loop as Bob did. I never had a problem when I was on board all the time but I left the sea cock open once recently and came back to a full bowl.

this might help:

http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/13.htm

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier <rhcmkc1@...> wrote:






Daryl---The first question is easy to answer, the inlet line for the toilet began to siphon water to the toilet bowl and evntually overflow and could have sunk the boat.  One answer, not one I'd recommend from personal experience, is to install a vented loop between the seacock and the head.  It will solve the problem of an accidentally opened seacock, for the venting stops the siphoning.  However, I did just that on the recommendation of West Marine's catalogue. But I could only get a small amount of water to enter the bowl (it was the same as trying to sip a soda through a straw with a hole in the straw, no suction).  So now I have a vented loop between the pump and the entry to the bowl because you can push fluids past a vented loop but not suction fluids past the loop. I'm told this is the correct way to go, hopefully I'll not find out otherwise.
   As to the second question, you must have an automatic bilge pump that was activated, because I don't know of any toilet that has a hose to the bilge (sounds smelly).
Bob (Red Rascal)
--- On Wed, 8/17/11, Daryl <dlclark@...> wrote:


From: Daryl <dlclark@...>
Subject: [Flicka20] Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:37 AM


 



Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.

What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.

So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:

1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...

2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?

We did pump the head on returning to the marina...

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433


Re: Gus' Boat Building

Angus Beare
 

Hi Bob

very interesting, thanks for posting that.

I am however, still enjoying my Flicka. I've not had any serious interest yet and have been making the best of her until I do.

Just had a cracking weekend sailing across to the Isle of Wight.

Folkboat regatta in Yarmouth, good pint of ale in the Kings Head and fishing for mackerel all the way out of the Needles channel. Caught six mackerel and two gar fish.

no prizes for guessing what I'm having for supper..

--- In Flicka20@..., Robert Collier <rhcmkc1@...> wrote:

Gus---For your posible boat building project, I'd like to suggest a relatively unknown & quick method---C-Flex.  It is often used for "one-off" designs, such as America's Cup boats.  It comes in 100'x12" rolls of glass rods interwoven with glass fibers. You cut it to length and staple it to your forms.  A resin application seals it.  1st photo shows it up against the wall and after applied. 2nd shot is after a resin/glass powder mix applied.  I can go into more detail if needed.
Bob (Red Rascal)


(No subject)

William Huesmann
 

Fantastic time is only for you!. http://gpsei.com/com.page.php?finPage=76oz5


Re: Marine Head - filling with water

Robert Collier
 

Daryl---The first question is easy to answer, the inlet line for the toilet began to siphon water to the toilet bowl and evntually overflow and could have sunk the boat.  One answer, not one I'd recommend from personal experience, is to install a vented loop between the seacock and the head.  It will solve the problem of an accidentally opened seacock, for the venting stops the siphoning.  However, I did just that on the recommendation of West Marine's catalogue. But I could only get a small amount of water to enter the bowl (it was the same as trying to sip a soda through a straw with a hole in the straw, no suction).  So now I have a vented loop between the pump and the entry to the bowl because you can push fluids past a vented loop but not suction fluids past the loop. I'm told this is the correct way to go, hopefully I'll not find out otherwise.
   As to the second question, you must have an automatic bilge pump that was activated, because I don't know of any toilet that has a hose to the bilge (sounds smelly).
Bob (Red Rascal)

--- On Wed, 8/17/11, Daryl wrote:

From: Daryl
Subject: [Flicka20] Marine Head - filling with water
To: Flicka20@...
Date: Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:37 AM

 
Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.

What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.

So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:

1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...

2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?

We did pump the head on returning to the marina...

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433


Marine Head - filling with water

Daryl Clark
 

Spent the weekend on Ballo Liscio, my wife left the seacock for the head intake open and the head overlflowed into the bilge.
Fortunately we caught it before it became a real problem.

What confused me was that after I closed the head intake seacock and started pumping the head dry, water was also being pumped out of the bilge overboard.

So, I have couple of questions that I am hopeful this group can possibly shed some light upon:

1. What causes the head to start filling with water? Is there a vent that is not working properly or??? Note, I recently rebuilt the Groco HF head pump...

2. The Y Valve diverted is locked in a close position and the seacock is closed because we sail on inland waters. Why did the pumping of the head cause the bilge to be pumped?


We did pump the head on returning to the marina...

Daryl
S/Y Ballo Liscio - Flicka 433


Gus' Boat Building

Robert Collier
 

Gus---For your posible boat building project, I'd like to suggest a relatively unknown & quick method---C-Flex.  It is often used for "one-off" designs, such as America's Cup boats.  It comes in 100'x12" rolls of glass rods interwoven with glass fibers. You cut it to length and staple it to your forms.  A resin application seals it.  1st photo shows it up against the wall and after applied. 2nd shot is after a resin/glass powder mix applied.  I can go into more detail if needed.
Bob (Red Rascal)


Re: Flicka search

Chuck Garrett
 

Just a thought.   If you do find a Flicka at your price point, be prepared to invest so serious dollars in making her ready to sail. I imagine that you will only find something that has been completely neglected for many years and in need of serious repair. 
 
I wish you the best in finding the boat of your dreams, and in turn making your dreams a reality.
 
Chuck Garrett
 
Prince of Whales
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Flicka20@... [mailto:Flicka20@...] On Behalf Of kcferg
Sent: Friday, August 05, 2011 4:56 PM
To: Flicka20@...
Subject: [Flicka20] Re: Flicka search

 

We live on the northern Gulf coast but will consider boats in other areas of the country if the price works out right with shipping. We can spend around 11,000, which makes it tough because there are several nice Flickas just out of this range.

--- In Flicka20@..., "jon" wrote:
>
> What is your price range, and area of country?
>
>
>
> From: Flicka20@... [mailto:Flicka20@...] On
> Behalf Of kcferg
> Sent: Friday, August 05, 2011 12:05 PM
> To: Flicka20@...
> Subject: [Flicka20] Flicka search
>
>
>
>
>
> Hello everyone,
>
> My husband and I have been avid Flicka admirers every since a good
> friend took us on our first sail on one 10 years ago (the Maggie Mae).
> We are now finally in the market for a Flicka of our own, but having a
> tough time finding one in our price range. They seem to disappear before
> we can even call about them! If anyone has an older Flicka that they are
> considering selling, or even one that needs a little work we would love
> to talk with you. Any other suggestions on how/where to locate an
> affordable Flicka would be great as well. Thanks!
>
> Karole
>
>
>
>
>
> This electronic message and all contents contain information, from McBride Distributing Co., Inc. which may be privileged, confidential or otherwise protected from disclosure. The information is intended to be for the addressee only. If you are not an addressee, any disclosure, copy, distribution or use of the contents of this message is prohibited. If you have received this electronic message in error, please notify the sender by reply e-mail and destroy the original message and all copies.
>


Caraway for sale

sbwye
 

Gus,

The Cormorant looks to be a beautiful little traditional craft, and practical too, e.g., the buoyancy tanks, loose foot, hidden engine well (where does the exhaust go; if in the well, it will hurt performance of the engine). As to the lacing, you may prefer Dutchman lacing over that shown, which makes dropping the sail easier. I assume you would go for the sloop rig; I am no fan of spars that interfere with sail shape on one tack. On this side of the pond, East Coast, we are fond of Beetle Cats and Aries Pond cats, for small boats that go anywhere without worrying about depth. You probably already know the site, but if not check out http://www.classicmarine.co.uk for salty gear and some good articles, e.g. one on the Dutchman lacing.

Tom


From: angusbeare2002
To: Flicka20@...
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2011 9:57 AM
Subject: Re: OOPS [Flicka20] Caraway for sale

 
thanks Tom

the cat boats look lovely and some of the smaller ones would do the job.

The main concern is that I am over in the UK. That makes getting a Cat boat less than practical.

There are numerous interesting craft of this kind over in the UK. But something which I have my eye on as a kit to build at home is the Cormorant:

http://seashellboats.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/new-cormorant-dinghy-review.pdf

http://seashellboats.co.uk/cormorant-dinghy/

Being only 12 foot would mean i could leave it in the dingy park or store in the garage. The plywood kits are very well organised and self build is easy with modern methods.

With the gunter rig she has a good sail area for such as small craft.

But I could still have a boom tent, outboard, oars and go explore places like Poole harbour and the solent with ease.

Also, the entire rig stows inside the boat meaning even though she is wood with a good cover the maintenance can be kept under control.

And if I decide I don't have time to build I can buy the grp version.
I can just add some nice wooden touches to make it unique.

Gus

--- In Flicka20@..., beall wrote:
>
> Sorry, the catboats for sale are at catboats.org, not catboat.org; note the correct site is plural.
>
> Tom
>
>
>
> >________________________________
> >From: beall
> >To: "Flicka20@..." <Flicka20@...>
> >Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:00 PM
> >Subject: [Flicka20] Caraway for sale
> >
> >
> > 
> >Glad you are going to keep in touch.
> >
> >
> >For your next boat: I have sailed the Chesapeake Bay in my Flicka with the Chesapeake Catboat Association CCBA, and recommend you look at a Herreshoff America or Marshall 18 footer (18 inches draft with the centerboard up - less than half the displacement of a Flicka at 2,700# - about the same square sail area). In general, they outsail the Flicka, particularly in light air. They sleep two and the club has an annual week long cruise. They were designed for offshore fishing. There are bigger ones. 
> >
> >
> >Check out the boats for sale at the catboat.org for the National catboat association and at CCBA; of course they lean toward the East Coast true to their New England origin. 
> >
> >
> >Tom
> >Flicka20 "Lyra"
> >Herroshoff America 18 "Sarah K"
> >
> >
> >
> >>________________________________
> >>From: angusbeare2002
> >>To: Flicka20@...
> >>Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 12:27 PM
> >>Subject: [Flicka20] Caraway for sale
> >>
> >>
> >> 
> >>Hi everyone
> >>
> >>It is with a heavy heart that i have decided to list the Caraway for sale. I have owned her since 2002 and have sailed thousands of miles in her and had the time of my life. What she has taught me I could not learn from books.
> >>
> >>I am finding that my lifestyle has changed and the costs of owning her are impossible to justify. Plus I now live on a tidal harbour and even though she only draws 3 feet I still cannot get out unless the tide is in. I am just not using her enough. I am away a lot and when I do have free time I can't get out because of the tide.
> >>
> >>The rough plan is to build something smaller that I can keep in the dinghy park or back garden that won't cost much and can be left unattended whenever we decide to go abroad. Perhaps a kit from Iain Oughtred's range or a Cormorant dinghy. We'll see. Ideally something I can still cruise in and have more adventures. But something I can exlored the shallow areas better in.
> >>
> >>Also I will charter or crew when I need an ocean fix. I am finally going to get a piece of paper which says "qualified sailor" on it later this month. That should help..
> >>
> >>Anyway, don't worry. If Caraway sells I shall still be happy to maintain the web site. I will just blog about other sailing adventures instead. And if she don't sell? Well, I'll just have to keep her won't I!
> >>
> >>She is in very good shape. Ready to sail away. Just needs some cosmetic attention. Sails are in very good condition and all rigging is brand new.
> >>
> >>The only down side for those over the pond is that she's in the UK.
> >>
> >>Enquiries to gus@...
> >>
> >>thanks
> >>Gus
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
>




Re: Changing the transmission oil

jason.zabriskie
 

Wonderful - thanks for the info David.  Engine, here we come.


On Fri, Aug 5, 2011 at 12:27 AM, dwramsey@... <dwramsey@...> wrote:
 


You use motor oil in the transmission. they recomend 100 hours for an oil change but I don't think that the tranny would need it that often. My boat Sally Ann is at Lake Tahoe so I put in the middle of April and take her out in the middle of October with less than 40 hrs during the season on the engine. I change the oil every year in both the engine and transmission. It takes less than 2 quarts for both. I use Moble 1 10/30.
David #294


10981 - 11000 of 28554