Date   

Re: Where to find Hull ID

Robert Collier
 

'Just a small comment, Julie, the number is "on the right side of the transom"?--Now, let's see if I face the transom that would make it on the port side of the boat, but if I'm sitting in the boat at the stern it would be on the starboard side. Hmmm
now I know why starboard and port are used instead of right and left.  Damn land lubbers just getting us all confused!  (don't take this too seriously I'm just poking fun at a common error that we all make) 

On Thursday, August 18, 2022 at 12:15:49 PM PDT, Julie Demaree <onboardboat@...> wrote:


My Hull ID is low on the right side of the transom, hard to see when in the water.





Re: Where to find Hull ID

Julie Demaree
 

My Hull ID is low on the right side of the transom, hard to see when in the water.


Re: Where to find Hull ID

billcartwright46
 


Inline image

Look on the transom at waterline on left side of rudder. It is ground into the fiberglass. Near where the keel meets the transom.




On Thursday, August 18, 2022, 10:49 AM, Erik Svenson <e_svenson@...> wrote:

thanks

 

From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Hooker
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2022 11:10 AM
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Where to find Hull ID

 

On ours it is on the bottom edge of the transom near the rudder on the port side. Supposed to be stbd side upper edge, but being that as it may, ours is port lower edge. Should be PCS20 plus 3 digit serial number and 4 character date code.

Jim Hooker

sv Niamh (278)

Detroit

 

On 8/18/2022 11:05 AM, Erik Svenson wrote:

May be a basic question, but where do I find the HIN on my Flicka?

 

Thanks, Erik

s/v Flicka (yes, it’s called “Flicka”)

 

Virus-free.www.avast.com


Re: Boarding Ladders

Joe Collins
 

Thanks Nick for your help. That tells me what I need to know  - Safe Sailing 


On Aug 18, 2022, at 10:54 AM, Joe Collins via groups.io <joemcollins007@...> wrote:

Hello - joe collins here - I have the last made Flicka made #434 - 1998 
I purchased the boat a year ago. Minus the ladder - does anyone have an idea where I can get a replacement - I would love to stay original if possible - if not what else works 
Thanks in advance - joe 


On Aug 15, 2022, at 6:09 PM, jritsemaod@... wrote:

Thanks to all who provided ideas on this.  Is a work in progress for me and will try to incorporate your feedback.
Jeff


Re: Where to find Hull ID

Erik Svenson
 

thanks

 

From: Flicka20@groups.io <Flicka20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Hooker
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2022 11:10 AM
To: Flicka20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Flicka20] Where to find Hull ID

 

On ours it is on the bottom edge of the transom near the rudder on the port side. Supposed to be stbd side upper edge, but being that as it may, ours is port lower edge. Should be PCS20 plus 3 digit serial number and 4 character date code.

Jim Hooker

sv Niamh (278)

Detroit

 

On 8/18/2022 11:05 AM, Erik Svenson wrote:

May be a basic question, but where do I find the HIN on my Flicka?

 

Thanks, Erik

s/v Flicka (yes, it’s called “Flicka”)

 

Virus-free.www.avast.com


Re: Where to find Hull ID

Jim Hooker
 

On ours it is on the bottom edge of the transom near the rudder on the port side. Supposed to be stbd side upper edge, but being that as it may, ours is port lower edge. Should be PCS20 plus 3 digit serial number and 4 character date code.

Jim Hooker

sv Niamh (278)

Detroit


On 8/18/2022 11:05 AM, Erik Svenson wrote:

May be a basic question, but where do I find the HIN on my Flicka?

 

Thanks, Erik

s/v Flicka (yes, it’s called “Flicka”)


Virus-free.www.avast.com


Where to find Hull ID

Erik Svenson
 

May be a basic question, but where do I find the HIN on my Flicka?

 

Thanks, Erik

s/v Flicka (yes, it’s called “Flicka”)


Re: Boarding Ladders

Joe Collins
 

Hello - joe collins here - I have the last made Flicka made #434 - 1998 
I purchased the boat a year ago. Minus the ladder - does anyone have an idea where I can get a replacement - I would love to stay original if possible - if not what else works 
Thanks in advance - joe 


On Aug 15, 2022, at 6:09 PM, jritsemaod@... wrote:

Thanks to all who provided ideas on this.  Is a work in progress for me and will try to incorporate your feedback.
Jeff


Rudder Cheeks Tiller Hole Location

kocarc@...
 


The cheeks were made from a slab of Osage Orange and now moving to locate and drill for the bolts.
Question, as I don't have the original cheeks - can someone provide the location of the tiller bolt hole by giving me the vertical and horizontal dimension to the bolt? The boat was built in 1982. I can approximate it from my photo pattern which unfortunately has the top foreshortened but thought better to check before drilling. Also fabricated a new motor mount to match but thicker. 

Thanks,
Tom
Hull 147


Re: Rudder Cheeks Replacement

ED SEITZ
 




On Aug 17, 2022, at 8:08 PM, kocarc via groups.io <kocarc@...> wrote:

The cheeks were made from a slab of Osage Orange and now moving to locate and drill for the bolts.
Question, as I don't have the original cheeks - can someone provide the location of the tiller bolt hole by giving me the vertical and horizontal dimension to the bolt? The boat was built in 1982. I can approximate it from my photo pattern which unfortunately has the top foreshortened but thought better to check before drilling. Also fabricated a new motor mount to match but thicker. 

Thanks,
Tom
Hull 147 Rudder Cheek 1.jfifRudder Cheek 2.jfifRudder Cheek 3.jfifRudder Cheek 5.jfifrudder Cheek 6.jfifMotor Mount 1.jfif


Re: Rudder Cheeks Replacement

kocarc@...
 

The cheeks were made from a slab of Osage Orange and now moving to locate and drill for the bolts.
Question, as I don't have the original cheeks - can someone provide the location of the tiller bolt hole by giving me the vertical and horizontal dimension to the bolt? The boat was built in 1982. I can approximate it from my photo pattern which unfortunately has the top foreshortened but thought better to check before drilling. Also fabricated a new motor mount to match but thicker. 

Thanks,
Tom
Hull 147


Re: mast screws

Giacomo Bernardi
 

Oh I bet this is what it is. It looks just like 14’’

Thanks much


On Wed, Aug 17, 2022 at 08:05 gabriel warren <gabriel@...> wrote:
Could be an incomplete job of mounting mast steps. Spacing could be a clue: 12” is normal, but some, like my MastMate, are 14”.


On Aug 17, 2022, at 10:06 AM, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

There are several sets at regular intervals the entire length of the mast. This is why I thought of a ladder. But they are only on one side of the mast. 
Very weird. 

On Wed, Aug 17, 2022 at 05:02 William Huesmann via groups.io <Livnaboard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Perhaps someone once mounted a winch handle holder there??

Bill Huesmann
S/V MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL

"Much as I love sailing, I'm not all that interested in going off sailing 'round the world --- though there are some who certainly wish I would." <W. Huesmann>



On Aug 16, 2022, at 19:29, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Sorry for bombarding with questions but as we approach our launch date more new things come up....

On one side of the mast, there are sets of screws, and we wonder what these are for, may be places for steps to climb up the mast?
<IMG-3563.jpg>


-- 
Bill Huesmann
MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL


-- 
Giacomo Bernardi
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of California Santa Cruz
Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab
115 McAllistair Way
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA

email: bernardi@...
http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/people/bernardi


--
Giacomo Bernardi
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of California Santa Cruz
Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab
115 McAllistair Way
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA

email: bernardi@...
http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/people/bernardi


Re: mast screws

gabriel warren
 

Could be an incomplete job of mounting mast steps. Spacing could be a clue: 12” is normal, but some, like my MastMate, are 14”.


On Aug 17, 2022, at 10:06 AM, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

There are several sets at regular intervals the entire length of the mast. This is why I thought of a ladder. But they are only on one side of the mast. 
Very weird. 

On Wed, Aug 17, 2022 at 05:02 William Huesmann via groups.io <Livnaboard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Perhaps someone once mounted a winch handle holder there??

Bill Huesmann
S/V MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL

"Much as I love sailing, I'm not all that interested in going off sailing 'round the world --- though there are some who certainly wish I would." <W. Huesmann>



On Aug 16, 2022, at 19:29, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Sorry for bombarding with questions but as we approach our launch date more new things come up....

On one side of the mast, there are sets of screws, and we wonder what these are for, may be places for steps to climb up the mast?
<IMG-3563.jpg>


-- 
Bill Huesmann
MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL


-- 
Giacomo Bernardi
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of California Santa Cruz
Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab
115 McAllistair Way
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA

email: bernardi@...
http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/people/bernardi



Re: mast screws

Giacomo Bernardi
 

There are several sets at regular intervals the entire length of the mast. This is why I thought of a ladder. But they are only on one side of the mast. 
Very weird. 

On Wed, Aug 17, 2022 at 05:02 William Huesmann via groups.io <Livnaboard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Perhaps someone once mounted a winch handle holder there??

Bill Huesmann
S/V MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL

"Much as I love sailing, I'm not all that interested in going off sailing 'round the world --- though there are some who certainly wish I would." <W. Huesmann>



On Aug 16, 2022, at 19:29, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Sorry for bombarding with questions but as we approach our launch date more new things come up....

On one side of the mast, there are sets of screws, and we wonder what these are for, may be places for steps to climb up the mast?
<IMG-3563.jpg>


--
Bill Huesmann
MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL

--
Giacomo Bernardi
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of California Santa Cruz
Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab
115 McAllistair Way
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA

email: bernardi@...
http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/people/bernardi


Re: mast screws

William Huesmann
 

Perhaps someone once mounted a winch handle holder there??

Bill Huesmann
S/V MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL

"Much as I love sailing, I'm not all that interested in going off sailing 'round the world --- though there are some who certainly wish I would." <W. Huesmann>



On Aug 16, 2022, at 19:29, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Sorry for bombarding with questions but as we approach our launch date more new things come up....

On one side of the mast, there are sets of screws, and we wonder what these are for, may be places for steps to climb up the mast?
<IMG-3563.jpg>


--
Bill Huesmann
MORNING STAR (Dana 139)
Gulf Shores, AL


Re: New Owner

Priscilla Wheatley
 

The thing about single-handing is avoiding assistance from people who think you need help.  I was tieing up at the Camden (Maine) Yacht Club and two older gentlemen on the float offered to help.  I politely declined but they grabbed something.  It totally screwed me up.  I put two fenders overboard. I don't use the bow line, just the spring and stern lines.  Make off the spring line first.  You are attached to the dock and the bow or stern cannot float away.  I pull the stern in so the cockpit is parallel to the float.  I came too close to tripping which they figured out.  

I have a rule of sorts for the rare occasions when I take someone out   If they know how to sail they have to sit on their hands.  

I came up with a remote control method of letting the anchor go. It involves a loop, a stick of some sort, and a long string.  You rig it up so pulling the string takes the stick out, the loop disappears and the anchor drops. It is handy when it is breezy and getting forward and back to the cockpit takes too long.  

Have fun Jeff !!!!!!!!    


mast screws

Giacomo Bernardi
 

Sorry for bombarding with questions but as we approach our launch date more new things come up....

On one side of the mast, there are sets of screws, and we wonder what these are for, may be places for steps to climb up the mast?


Re: Red Rascal "Home made"

Michael Schmidtman
 

Good response, Robert!!

*******************************************************************************************************************************

On Sunday, August 14, 2022 at 04:24:55 PM PDT, Robert Collier via groups.io <rhcmkc1@...> wrote:


'Just want to get one small thing off my chest before I fade into the sailing sunset:  One enquirer about the Red Rascal dismissed interest in the boat with a single, sneering comment "home made".   Many items have their beginning as "home made"---Bruce Bingham, the naval architect and first builder of the initial plug for the Flicka started from a home design and construction.  Those two stubborn bicycle mechanics and brothers from Kittyhawk built their flying machine in their garage.  So, today every supersonic plane has their DNA from that moment in history.  And yes, my Flicka was built in  my garage.  I used superior equipment equal to or better than a production model---really, better? One example: production Flickas use vinyl- or polyester resins for their molds, but I used epoxy in the construction for added strength.  Epoxy is not a resin but a polymer and is stronger than a resin although it costs about twice as much.  So, without further elaboration, when you hear of something "home made" don't think cheap or sloppy, but possibly custom crafted with better materials---Thank you,  Bob Collier


Re: Tabernacle

Giacomo Bernardi
 

Fabulous, I am on it, thank you so much

if you watch this video

and pause at the time: 15 seconds (yes the very beginning of the video) you can see a hinged tabernacle, which seems very different than what I have but makes complete sense to me if one wants to lower and raise the mast easily.



On Tue, Aug 16, 2022 at 11:10 AM gabriel warren <gabriel@...> wrote:
Giacomo— With a little digging, I found the article in Flicka Friends. It is in #66, Winter 2018 (vol 19, #1). You can google ‘Flicka Friends newsletter’ to see it.

Good luck.


On Aug 16, 2022, at 12:45 PM, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Okay I’ll send a picture next time I am at the boat, as I bet I am confused about the whole system. 
But your description fits what I thought the procedure would be. 

On Tue, Aug 16, 2022 at 09:36 gabriel warren <gabriel@...> wrote:
If I read you correctly, that slot is in the tabernacle. You may be thinking of a much larger fitting with the pivot point much higher. I use the standard tabernacle for mast erection / lowering, but with a twist: I have to crowbar the mast butt forward and use ‘cheek plates’ (holes about 4” apart) to allow the butt to lift higher than the slot will allow when horizontal since I have a sea hood. As well, there are solar panels on the hood and the gooseneck fitting, permanently attached to the mast, could make quick work of them.

This was illustrated in a Flicka Friends piece. The photography was not mine, so I do not have the images, otherwise I would attach.



On Aug 16, 2022, at 12:25 PM, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Quick question, how easy is it to add a tabernacle to the base of the mast?
is it possible to lower and raise the mast without one but just using the long slit that allows the pin to move up and down?




-- 
Giacomo Bernardi
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of California Santa Cruz
Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab
115 McAllistair Way
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA

email: bernardi@...
http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/people/bernardi


GABRIEL WARREN-- SCULPTOR


720 King's Factory Rd
Charlestown
Rhode Island USA 02813
401.364.0087 

7984 Rt. 337
Antigonish Nova Scotia
B2G 2L1 Canada
902.863.5822







--
Giacomo Bernardi
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of California
Ocean Health Building, Long Marine Lab
115 McAllister Way
Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA

Tel: office 831 459 5124
Tel: lab 831 459 1282
Fax: 831 459 3383
email: bernardi@...


Re: Tabernacle

gabriel warren
 

Giacomo— With a little digging, I found the article in Flicka Friends. It is in #66, Winter 2018 (vol 19, #1). You can google ‘Flicka Friends newsletter’ to see it.

Good luck.


On Aug 16, 2022, at 12:45 PM, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Okay I’ll send a picture next time I am at the boat, as I bet I am confused about the whole system. 
But your description fits what I thought the procedure would be. 

On Tue, Aug 16, 2022 at 09:36 gabriel warren <gabriel@...> wrote:
If I read you correctly, that slot is in the tabernacle. You may be thinking of a much larger fitting with the pivot point much higher. I use the standard tabernacle for mast erection / lowering, but with a twist: I have to crowbar the mast butt forward and use ‘cheek plates’ (holes about 4” apart) to allow the butt to lift higher than the slot will allow when horizontal since I have a sea hood. As well, there are solar panels on the hood and the gooseneck fitting, permanently attached to the mast, could make quick work of them.

This was illustrated in a Flicka Friends piece. The photography was not mine, so I do not have the images, otherwise I would attach.



On Aug 16, 2022, at 12:25 PM, Giacomo Bernardi via groups.io <bernardi@...> wrote:

Quick question, how easy is it to add a tabernacle to the base of the mast?
is it possible to lower and raise the mast without one but just using the long slit that allows the pin to move up and down?




-- 
Giacomo Bernardi
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of California Santa Cruz
Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab
115 McAllistair Way
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA

email: bernardi@...
http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/people/bernardi


GABRIEL WARREN-- SCULPTOR


720 King's Factory Rd
Charlestown
Rhode Island USA 02813
401.364.0087 

7984 Rt. 337
Antigonish Nova Scotia
B2G 2L1 Canada
902.863.5822





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