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Submitting images for contests and online use

 

I have no doubt this is old-hat to most everyone  here, but I'd also wager that many of us are tutoring less experienced shooters as well. Common in today's digital environment is the ubiquitous online contest or the need to post good-looking images on the internet. Not everyone knows step-by-step how to prepare such images. Some number of years ago, I created a tutorial on that, which is free to use.

It is here:

http://tvalleau.clarify-it.com/d/rhfqq4


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Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

I found this tutorial so helpful when I entered my first juried exhibit last year. Thanks for sharing, Tracy.

Abigail G.
 

Tracy,

I just found your fabulous tutorial on resizing images for contest submissions, and I thank you for it.

I have one question: Am I wrong to have assumed that that the jpg image should be 72 instead of 300?

Yours,

Abigail

AbigailGumbiner.com

 

Hello, and welcome to the group.  :-)

As explained, the DPI/PPI does not matter when the image size is specified in pixels (ie: 4000 x 3000). The DPI is used -only- in printing. Some contest organizers are confused about this too, so you may see something like "4000 x 3000 @ 72 PPI/DPI". That's actually nonsense. The image size is the image size. The -printed- size will change based on the DPI. So, if you had a 4000 x 3000 image at (say) 2 Dots Per Inch, the resulting print would be 2000 inches by 1500 inches (Huge!). The same 4000 x 3000 image at  300 Dots Per Inch, would make a print about 13 inches by 10 inches. The point is that the file -itself- is the same in both cases.

So: the correct specification for a digital file is either 1) size in pixels on each edge (ie 4000 x 3000) or b) size in inches on each edge (ie 13.3 x 10) and the DPI (say 300) [13.3 x 300 = 4000 and 10 x 300 = 3000].

And, as extra credit, there's this: no monitor has been made at 72 PPI for several decades now. Most are between 90 and 120, although some are even higher. "72" is left-over from the typographer trade, where there are 72 points per inch. So, if you see "72" specified, you should be immediately cautious, that the author really understands what they are saying, as opposed to just repeating something they heard somewhere.

Finally, just because the contest runner doesn't know what they are talking about is no reason not to capitulate to the rules. If they say "4000 x 3000 @72 PPI/DPI" then by all means give it to them. Never violate the rules of submission, even if they are incorrect...

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Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Abigail G.
 

Thank you so much Tracy. Believe it or not I have been doing digital printing for more than 15 years! (And it was wild, crazy ,hit and miss in those days.) And I have heard your explanation many times.....and I am ashamed to admit that I am married to a well know retired fine art lithographer! But I have never been clear on some of this stuff. In Lightroom there is a choice and I have always put in 72 (and I always use 360 on my epson 7800). I also do check the final size of a submission with the Get Info right click of the mouse. I  am very careful to match the digital size that is requested for the entry.
So are you saying that the number that I put in that Lightroom box when creating jpgs to send into shows does not make any difference?
I feel like such an idiot asking you this.
By the way, I just found out about this group through the ASMP Fine Art Photographers group, as some members are grumbling about leaving Yahoo Groups.....which I would love to get rid of too.


Most recent show: CODA:CHROME Radical Sculpture for People and Walls, LA BREWERY ARTS COMPLEX downtown Los Angeles through November 1.
A survey of new sculpture from my studies in chrome. Hollywood costume designer, Francine Lecoultre, repurposes select sculptures into costume worn by human models opening night. Show also includes my sculptures of abstract drawings by Peter Holmes. The new work can be seen at AbigailGumbiner.com

Video about my Sculpture, directed by David H Wells https://vimeo.com/101639953
Sculpture feature story in The Handmade Photograph Magazine http://www.magcloud.com/webviewer/732359



On Sat, Oct 8, 2016 at 2:28 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Hello, and welcome to the group.  :-)

As explained, the DPI/PPI does not matter when the image size is specified in pixels (ie: 4000 x 3000). The DPI is used -only- in printing. Some contest organizers are confused about this too, so you may see something like "4000 x 3000 @ 72 PPI/DPI". That's actually nonsense. The image size is the image size. The -printed- size will change based on the DPI. So, if you had a 4000 x 3000 image at (say) 2 Dots Per Inch, the resulting print would be 2000 inches by 1500 inches (Huge!). The same 4000 x 3000 image at  300 Dots Per Inch, would make a print about 13 inches by 10 inches. The point is that the file -itself- is the same in both cases.

So: the correct specification for a digital file is either 1) size in pixels on each edge (ie 4000 x 3000) or b) size in inches on each edge (ie 13.3 x 10) and the DPI (say 300) [13.3 x 300 = 4000 and 10 x 300 = 3000].

And, as extra credit, there's this: no monitor has been made at 72 PPI for several decades now. Most are between 90 and 120, although some are even higher. "72" is left-over from the typographer trade, where there are 72 points per inch. So, if you see "72" specified, you should be immediately cautious, that the author really understands what they are saying, as opposed to just repeating something they heard somewhere.

Finally, just because the contest runner doesn't know what they are talking about is no reason not to capitulate to the rules. If they say "4000 x 3000 @72 PPI/DPI" then by all means give it to them. Never violate the rules of submission, even if they are incorrect...

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery


 

> I  am very careful to match the digital size that is requested for the entry.

Excellent. That's perfect

>So are you saying that the number that I put in that Lightroom box when creating jpgs to send into shows does not make any difference?

Yes... and no.
Yes: it makes no difference in the real world at all, if you are supplying the specified pixel size.
No: it makes a difference to the show organizers if the show specs call for it. Don't give them -any- excuse to eliminate one of your images. So, even if (Yes: it makes no difference in the real world at all) put it into the file if they ask for it.

Abigail G.
 

Thank you, I'm getting too old to keep track of all this stuff.
Abigail


Most recent show: CODA:CHROME Radical Sculpture for People and Walls, LA BREWERY ARTS COMPLEX downtown Los Angeles through November 1.
A survey of new sculpture from my studies in chrome. Hollywood costume designer, Francine Lecoultre, repurposes select sculptures into costume worn by human models opening night. Show also includes my sculptures of abstract drawings by Peter Holmes. The new work can be seen at AbigailGumbiner.com

Video about my Sculpture, directed by David H Wells https://vimeo.com/101639953
Sculpture feature story in The Handmade Photograph Magazine http://www.magcloud.com/webviewer/732359



On Sat, Oct 8, 2016 at 4:23 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

> I  am very careful to match the digital size that is requested for the entry.

Excellent. That's perfect

>So are you saying that the number that I put in that Lightroom box when creating jpgs to send into shows does not make any difference?

Yes... and no.
Yes: it makes no difference in the real world at all, if you are supplying the specified pixel size.
No: it makes a difference to the show organizers if the show specs call for it. Don't give them -any- excuse to eliminate one of your images. So, even if (Yes: it makes no difference in the real world at all) put it into the file if they ask for it.


Jim Kasson
 

Tracy, I recently did a blog post on when ppi matters, and when it doesn't:

http://blog.kasson.com/?p=15771

Might be useful in the context of this thread, although you are completely right when you say it matters not one whit for contest submission.

Jim


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Jim Kasson

ImageMaker

Blog: blog.kasson.com

Gallery: www.kasson.com

 

Jim, thank you for that post (and the others this morning.) And thank you especially for pointing out that I was so concentrated on printing that I neglected to note the effect of PPI on the printing applications themselves! A bit embarrassing...

Folks, take a look at Jim's blog, linked in his post above, for an excellent show-n-tell on the effect of PPI in applications whose output is intended for print.

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery