Topics

Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

 

I've been frustrated for a while with my printed images being darker than what I see in PS or LR. First off, I do calibrate my monitor, using a Spyder 4. I have custom printer profiles for my papers and printer, by our very own Tracy Valleau. I soft-proof in PS, using the view > proof setup menu. I figure if I do all that, what I get out of the printer should be pretty close to what I see on the screen. Nope. No matter if I print out of PS or a program such as PrintTool, my prints (black and white) are dark. I can get the print to look like what I see on the screen if I print out of LR and set the exposure slider to +20 or so.

Any thoughts on what I am doing wrong?

--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 

Fortunately, 90% of the time this is an easy question to answer: your monitor is too bright. I find that 85-120 cd/m is about right. Your monitor profiling software should allow you to set this.

At first, it will bug you, but as it turns out, the darker screen is actually easier on your eyes. Finally, remember that you can make several profile (if you take the time to do it). Thus you can have one at 85% another at 120%. You can have one set for sRGB and another set for NTSC (video). It's trivial to switch between them, and change how your screen responds.

hth

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery

On 15 Jun 2016, at 14:20, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

I've been frustrated for a while with my printed images being darker than what I see in PS or LR. First off, I do calibrate my monitor, using a Spyder 4. I have custom printer profiles for my papers and printer, by our very own Tracy Valleau. I soft-proof in PS, using the view > proof setup menu. I figure if I do all that, what I get out of the printer should be pretty close to what I see on the screen. Nope. No matter if I print out of PS or a program such as PrintTool, my prints (black and white) are dark. I can get the print to look like what I see on the screen if I print out of LR and set the exposure slider to +20 or so.

Any thoughts on what I am doing wrong?

--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com
--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

Thanks Tracy. Adjusting the brightness with Spyder isn’t all the easy to figure out. I think I have it in a better place now.

A follow-up question if I may. The image on-screen looks bluer than the print. Is that a color temperature thing? And if so, wouldn’t calibration fix that?

Thanks!
Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 2:32 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Fortunately, 90% of the time this is an easy question to answer: your monitor is too bright. I find that 85-120 cd/m is about right. Your monitor profiling software should allow you to set this.

At first, it will bug you, but as it turns out, the darker screen is actually easier on your eyes. Finally, remember that you can make several profile (if you take the time to do it). Thus you can have one at 85% another at 120%. You can have one set for sRGB and another set for NTSC (video). It's trivial to switch between them, and change how your screen responds.

hth

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 15 Jun 2016, at 14:20, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

I've been frustrated for a while with my printed images being darker than what I see in PS or LR. First off, I do calibrate my monitor, using a Spyder 4. I have custom printer profiles for my papers and printer, by our very own Tracy Valleau. I soft-proof in PS, using the view > proof setup menu. I figure if I do all that, what I get out of the printer should be pretty close to what I see on the screen. Nope. No matter if I print out of PS or a program such as PrintTool, my prints (black and white) are dark. I can get the print to look like what I see on the screen if I print out of LR and set the exposure slider to +20 or so.

Any thoughts on what I am doing wrong?

--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery


--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 
Edited

Although I use an Xrite product for such work, I would expect that the Spyder's brightness control would be one of the first things you encounter when running the software; certainly before the color swatches start parading. You may have to enable an "expert" or "advanced" mode to see it. Sorry: I simply am not familiar with the software.

(Incidentally, profiling and calibrating are two different things, although your software may first calibrate and then create a profile.)

As to the blue, most certainly, the profiles should take care of that.  Had you said "magenta" cast I'd have suggested that you forgot to set (the equivalent of) "photoshop manages colors" in the software and then choose the right printer profile, and finally, when you get to the printer's own dialog, select "No color management". 

ALL those steps must be done to get a WYSIWYG color image.

If you are using PrintTool for your color work (I do) then you want to make sure that you have set Application managed and chosen the paper profile, and again, in the printer's own dialog, choose No Color Management.

Now: is a blue cast a common symptom of an incorrect color temperature? Well, it certainly can be. Check your white balance. But if your image is too blue on a properly calibrated and profiled screen, it should be too blue in the print as well.

So, to track this down, this first question isn't "too blue" but "does the print reasonably match the screen?" If not, then something is wrong with one of the profiles, most likely.

And, when tracking these things down, don't was full sheets of paper with full images. Take a snippet of the offending image that will, when printed, show you enough to make a valid judgement, and then position it on the paper such that you can re-use the paper several times, printing in a new position each time. No point in wasting paper and ink!  :-)

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

Matt,

What is the make and age of your monitor? This could have something to do with it.
--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com

 

Tracy

I believe I am getting all the settings when printing. It’s not that the screen is too blue, it’s that the color cast of the print and the screen are different. I’ll go through the list that you’ve suggested just to make sure I’m doing it right. I’ll let you know what I find, if anything. Good tip about the snippet!

Thanks!
Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 4:44 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Although I use an Xrite product for such work, I would expect that the Spyder's brightness control would be one of the first things you encounter when running the software; certainly before the color swatches start parading. You may have to enable an "expert" or "advanced" mode to see it. Sorry: I simply am not familiar with the software.

(Incidentally, profiling and calibrating are two different things, although your software may first calibrate and then create a profile.)

As to the blue, most certainly, the profiles should take care of that.  Had you said "magenta" cast I'd have suggested that you forgot to set (the equivalent of) "photoshop manages colors" in the software and then choose the right printer profile, and finally, when you get to the printer's own dialog, select "No color management". 

ALL those steps must be done to get a SYSIWYG color image.

If you are using PrintTool for your color work (I do) then you want to make sure that you have set Application managed and chosen the paper profile, and again, in the printer's own dialog, choose No Color Management.

Now: is a blue cast a common symptom of an incorrect color temperature? Well, it certainly can be. Check your white balance. But if your image is too blue on a properly calibrated and profiled screen, it should be too blue in the print as well.

So, to track this down, this first question isn't "too blue" but "does the print reasonably match the screen?" If not, then something is wrong with one of the profiles, most likely.

And, when tracking these things down, don't was full sheets of paper with full images. Take a snippet of the offending image that will, when printed, show you enough to make a valid judgement, and then position it on the paper such that you can re-use the paper several times, printing in a new position each time. No point in wasting paper and ink!  :-)

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator


Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery




--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 

Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:00 PM, Mark Savoia <mark@...> wrote:

Matt,

What is the make and age of your monitor? This could have something to do with it.
--
Mark


stillrivereditions.com




--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?

On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors@...> wrote:

Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt


Rick Verbanec
 

Don't forget the Lightroom brightness and contrast adjustments in the Print module as a last tweak available.  
 
Rick
sent from Yahoo Mail



From: Mark Savoia <mark@...>
To: FineArtPhotography@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 5:16 PM
Subject: Re: [FineArtPhotography] Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?


On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors@...> wrote:

Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt



 

Mark

No, haven't tried ABW. I'm still trying the approach of getting the screen and print in agreement. We'll see how that works out!

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:16 PM, Mark Savoia <mark@...> wrote:

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?


On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors@...> wrote:

Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt


--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com


--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 

Rick

Thanks. Yep, that's a fallback. If I set the exposure slider to +20, my print brightness is pretty close to the screen. 

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:44 PM, rick.verbanec via Groups.io <rick.verbanec@...> wrote:

Don't forget the Lightroom brightness and contrast adjustments in the Print module as a last tweak available.  
 
Rick
sent from Yahoo Mail



From: Mark Savoia <mark@...>
To: FineArtPhotography@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 5:16 PM
Subject: Re: [FineArtPhotography] Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?


On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors@...> wrote:

Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt




--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 

Sorry - I was away for the last 3 hours.

I'd want to make sure first that this happens with all your images.

In fact, a test I'd run would be to go out and take a simple JPG image; throw it up on the screen and see how it looks.

Does the image still look blue? Does it look the same in Preview (are you on a Mac?) as it does in Photoshop/Lightroom? Open them up side by side so you can see them both at once.

Whether they look different or the same would go a long way toward finding a solution.

OH... I just re-read you post about print vs screen. So, does the image on the screen look correct, or the image from the printer? The best t hing to test this with is an accurate image that includes a person. I like this one:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/PDI-Target.jpg



Tracy
www.valleau.gallery

On 15 Jun 2016, at 17:55, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Rick

Thanks. Yep, that's a fallback. If I set the exposure slider to +20, my print brightness is pretty close to the screen.

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:44 PM, rick.verbanec via Groups.io <rick.verbanec=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Don't forget the Lightroom brightness and contrast adjustments in the Print module as a last tweak available.

Rick
sent from Yahoo Mail


From: Mark Savoia <@stillrivereditions>
To: FineArtPhotography@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 5:16 PM
Subject: Re: [FineArtPhotography] Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?

Mark
stillrivereditions.com

On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt


--
Mark
stillrivereditions.com


--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

Tracy

Thanks for the input. Yes, it seems to be with all my images. I first noticed it in the the greys - they are colder on screen than in a print, regardless of which paper I use. I don’t print much color, but I do have one color print from New Zealand. It shows the white Nugget Point lighthouse against a blue sky and sea. To my eye, the white in the print is closer to reality than the white I see on screen. This is leading me to believe that my screen calibration/profile is off. Does that make sense?

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 9:06 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Sorry - I was away for the last 3 hours.

I'd want to make sure first that this happens with all your images.

In fact, a test I'd run would be to go out and take a simple JPG image; throw it up on the screen and see how it looks.

Does the image still look blue? Does it look the same in Preview (are you on a Mac?) as it does in Photoshop/Lightroom? Open them up side by side so you can see them both at once.

Whether they look different or the same would go a long way toward finding a solution.

OH... I just re-read you post about print vs screen. So, does the image on the screen look correct, or the image from the printer? The best t hing to test this with is an accurate image that includes a person. I like this one:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/PDI-Target.jpg



Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 15 Jun 2016, at 17:55, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Rick

Thanks. Yep, that's a fallback. If I set the exposure slider to +20, my print brightness is pretty close to the screen.

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:44 PM, rick.verbanec via Groups.io <rick.verbanec=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Don't forget the Lightroom brightness and contrast adjustments in the Print module as a last tweak available.

Rick
sent from Yahoo Mail


From: Mark Savoia <@stillrivereditions>
To: FineArtPhotography@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 5:16 PM
Subject: Re: [FineArtPhotography] Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?

Mark
stillrivereditions.com

On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt


--
Mark
stillrivereditions.com



--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery


--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 
Edited

Very likely, Matt.

Regaring your monitor: it should be calibrated for

Gamma 2.2
Color Temp D6500
and a brightness of about 100 (120 if that's too dim for you)

The Calibration of your monitor involves three things: setting the brightness, setting the color temperature (aka white point) and adjusting the RGB levels properly.

In your calibration software, there should be a place to do all of those before the color-swatch profiling starts, although as I mentioned before, it may be hidden behind "expert" or "advanced" mode.

If there is a cast to the screen, you should be able to see it by making a white image in Photoshop. If it appears bluish, then your monitor is off.

Here's a white/gray value jpg to check with:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/White-gray.jpg

... and don't forget, the white on the paper is likely to always be warmer than what you see on the screen.

I neglected to ask: are you making your comparisons when viewing on the monitor using soft proofing? If not, making a judgement is much more difficult...

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery

On 16 Jun 2016, at 12:43, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Tracy

Thanks for the input. Yes, it seems to be with all my images. I first noticed it in the the greys - they are colder on screen than in a print, regardless of which paper I use. I don’t print much color, but I do have one color print from New Zealand. It shows the white Nugget Point lighthouse against a blue sky and sea. To my eye, the white in the print is closer to reality than the white I see on screen. This is leading me to believe that my screen calibration/profile is off. Does that make sense?

Matt


On Jun 15, 2016, at 9:06 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Sorry - I was away for the last 3 hours.

I'd want to make sure first that this happens with all your images.

In fact, a test I'd run would be to go out and take a simple JPG image; throw it up on the screen and see how it looks.

Does the image still look blue? Does it look the same in Preview (are you on a Mac?) as it does in Photoshop/Lightroom? Open them up side by side so you can see them both at once.

Whether they look different or the same would go a long way toward finding a solution.

OH... I just re-read you post about print vs screen. So, does the image on the screen look correct, or the image from the printer? The best t hing to test this with is an accurate image that includes a person. I like this one:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/PDI-Target.jpg



Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 15 Jun 2016, at 17:55, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Rick

Thanks. Yep, that's a fallback. If I set the exposure slider to +20, my print brightness is pretty close to the screen.

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:44 PM, rick.verbanec via Groups.io <rick.verbanec=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Don't forget the Lightroom brightness and contrast adjustments in the Print module as a last tweak available.

Rick
sent from Yahoo Mail


From: Mark Savoia <@stillrivereditions>
To: FineArtPhotography@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 5:16 PM
Subject: Re: [FineArtPhotography] Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?

Mark
stillrivereditions.com

On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt


--
Mark
stillrivereditions.com



--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery




--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

Yes to softproofing. Yes to Gamma 2.2, yes to D6500 (under display > color > calibration in system preferences) and a brightness of 97. I’ve run a full calibration after confirming those settings. There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of advanced settings in the Spyder software, but I’ve confirmed those are the target values for calibration.

Your white-gray jpg matches the tones I see on screen with my b&w, which appear cooler to me than the prints do. Not horribly so, but a bit.

I think I’ve done what I can at this point, I just have to realize that’s what is going to happen…

Thanks for all the help, it is much appreciated! At least I’ve got the brightness issue resolved!

Matt

On Jun 16, 2016, at 1:10 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Very likely, Matt.

You have not said yet exactly what monitor you're using, but it should be calibrated for

Gamma 2.2
Color Temp D6500
and a brightness of about 100 (120 if that's too dim for you)

The Calibration of your monitor involves three things: setting the brightness, setting the color temperature (aka white point) and adjusting the RGB levels properly.

In your calibration software, there should be a place to do all of those before the color-swatch profiling starts, although as I mentioned before, it may be hidden behind "expert" or "advanced" mode.

If there is a cast to the screen, you should be able to see it by making a white image in Photoshop. If it appears bluish, then your monitor is off.

Here's a white/gray value jpg to check with:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/White-gray.jpg


Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 16 Jun 2016, at 12:43, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Tracy

Thanks for the input. Yes, it seems to be with all my images. I first noticed it in the the greys - they are colder on screen than in a print, regardless of which paper I use. I don’t print much color, but I do have one color print from New Zealand. It shows the white Nugget Point lighthouse against a blue sky and sea. To my eye, the white in the print is closer to reality than the white I see on screen. This is leading me to believe that my screen calibration/profile is off. Does that make sense?

Matt


On Jun 15, 2016, at 9:06 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Sorry - I was away for the last 3 hours.

I'd want to make sure first that this happens with all your images.

In fact, a test I'd run would be to go out and take a simple JPG image; throw it up on the screen and see how it looks.

Does the image still look blue? Does it look the same in Preview (are you on a Mac?) as it does in Photoshop/Lightroom? Open them up side by side so you can see them both at once.

Whether they look different or the same would go a long way toward finding a solution.

OH... I just re-read you post about print vs screen. So, does the image on the screen look correct, or the image from the printer? The best t hing to test this with is an accurate image that includes a person. I like this one:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/PDI-Target.jpg



Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 15 Jun 2016, at 17:55, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Rick

Thanks. Yep, that's a fallback. If I set the exposure slider to +20, my print brightness is pretty close to the screen.

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:44 PM, rick.verbanec via Groups.io <rick.verbanec=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Don't forget the Lightroom brightness and contrast adjustments in the Print module as a last tweak available.

Rick
sent from Yahoo Mail


From: Mark Savoia <@stillrivereditions>
To: FineArtPhotography@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 5:16 PM
Subject: Re: [FineArtPhotography] Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?

Mark
stillrivereditions.com

On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt


--
Mark
stillrivereditions.com



--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery




--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery


--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

 

OK... I'm glad you're happy.

that said... you likely ran a "profile", not a calibration. Next time we meet, I'll explain that again, if it's got you confused. (Don't feel bad; people confuse them, and even "experts" use the wrong word now and again...)

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery

On 16 Jun 2016, at 14:32, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Yes to softproofing. Yes to Gamma 2.2, yes to D6500 (under display > color > calibration in system preferences) and a brightness of 97. I’ve run a full calibration after confirming those settings. There doesn’t seem to be much in the way of advanced settings in the Spyder software, but I’ve confirmed those are the target values for calibration.

Your white-gray jpg matches the tones I see on screen with my b&w, which appear cooler to me than the prints do. Not horribly so, but a bit.

I think I’ve done what I can at this point, I just have to realize that’s what is going to happen…

Thanks for all the help, it is much appreciated! At least I’ve got the brightness issue resolved!

Matt

On Jun 16, 2016, at 1:10 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Very likely, Matt.

You have not said yet exactly what monitor you're using, but it should be calibrated for

Gamma 2.2
Color Temp D6500
and a brightness of about 100 (120 if that's too dim for you)

The Calibration of your monitor involves three things: setting the brightness, setting the color temperature (aka white point) and adjusting the RGB levels properly.

In your calibration software, there should be a place to do all of those before the color-swatch profiling starts, although as I mentioned before, it may be hidden behind "expert" or "advanced" mode.

If there is a cast to the screen, you should be able to see it by making a white image in Photoshop. If it appears bluish, then your monitor is off.

Here's a white/gray value jpg to check with:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/White-gray.jpg


Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 16 Jun 2016, at 12:43, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Tracy

Thanks for the input. Yes, it seems to be with all my images. I first noticed it in the the greys - they are colder on screen than in a print, regardless of which paper I use. I don’t print much color, but I do have one color print from New Zealand. It shows the white Nugget Point lighthouse against a blue sky and sea. To my eye, the white in the print is closer to reality than the white I see on screen. This is leading me to believe that my screen calibration/profile is off. Does that make sense?

Matt


On Jun 15, 2016, at 9:06 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Sorry - I was away for the last 3 hours.

I'd want to make sure first that this happens with all your images.

In fact, a test I'd run would be to go out and take a simple JPG image; throw it up on the screen and see how it looks.

Does the image still look blue? Does it look the same in Preview (are you on a Mac?) as it does in Photoshop/Lightroom? Open them up side by side so you can see them both at once.

Whether they look different or the same would go a long way toward finding a solution.

OH... I just re-read you post about print vs screen. So, does the image on the screen look correct, or the image from the printer? The best t hing to test this with is an accurate image that includes a person. I like this one:

http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/PDI-Target.jpg



Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 15 Jun 2016, at 17:55, Matt Connors via Groups.io wrote:

Rick

Thanks. Yep, that's a fallback. If I set the exposure slider to +20, my print brightness is pretty close to the screen.

Matt

On Jun 15, 2016, at 5:44 PM, rick.verbanec via Groups.io <rick.verbanec=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Don't forget the Lightroom brightness and contrast adjustments in the Print module as a last tweak available.

Rick
sent from Yahoo Mail


From: Mark Savoia <@stillrivereditions>
To: FineArtPhotography@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 5:16 PM
Subject: Re: [FineArtPhotography] Printing - why are my prints darker than what I see on the screen?

That could not help. Also I think the older iMacs had an over-brightness issue and could not be calibrated to the correct brightness even with a good monitor calibrator.

Referring to your issue with color balance of b&w print, have you tried the ABW settings in the Epson driver?

Mark
stillrivereditions.com

On Jun 15, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Matt Connors via Groups.io <mdconnors=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mark

I have a late 2009 27” iMac. Getting a bit long in the tooth, I know.

Matt


--
Mark
stillrivereditions.com



--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery




--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery




--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery