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Experience with Fuji XT20 or XT10?

 

Does anyone out there have any experience with the Fuji XT20 or XT10? I'm looking for a good lighter-weight camera as a travel camera on trips that aren't photo-centric and a general walk-around camera. For example, my wife and I are going to Eastern Europe in the fall, mostly cities, carry-on luggage only, and lugging my full frame DSLR doesn't sound like all that much fun. I'm also thinking of going even smaller, like the Sony RX100, but am looking seriously at the XT20.

Any input would be appreciated.

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Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.mattconnorsphotography.com

 

I'm happily using the Canon G9 X as my pocket camera:

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1308387-REG/canon_1717c001_powershot_g9_x_mark.html

Tracy
www.valleau.art




On 30 Apr 2017, at 15:02, Matt Connors via Groups.Io wrote:

Does anyone out there have any experience with the Fuji XT20 or XT10? I'm looking for a good lighter-weight camera as a travel camera on trips that aren't photo-centric and a general walk-around camera. For example, my wife and I are going to Eastern Europe in the fall, mostly cities, carry-on luggage only, and lugging my full frame DSLR doesn't sound like all that much fun. I'm also thinking of going even smaller, like the Sony RX100, but am looking seriously at the XT20.

Any input would be appreciated.

--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.mattconnorsphotography.com


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Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

Thanks Tracy. I'm torn between two different types of camera as my "other" camera. One way to go is something like the Canon you recommended, or the Sony RX100, or Lumix, or others of that ilk. On the plus side, I like the size of those cameras a lot. Easy to carry around, fits in a pocket. On the minus side, there's no potential for expansion. Want a longer lens? Sorry. And I have a hard time with no viewfinder at all. Maybe I could get used to that, but it's still a minus for me.

On the plus side for the Fuji or its competitors, it's still lightweight and there's plenty of expansion potential. On the minus side, it's not fitting in a pocket. It will always be hanging from my neck. The expansion potential has the potential for mission creep, where my easy-to-carry camera ends up with lots of accessories that make it not so easy to carry. And, these cameras are more expensive.

Sigh. Decisions, decisions.

--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.mattconnorsphotography.com

 

I can certainly understand your conundrum, Matt. My thoughts, as followup, would be from my own experience.

Viewfinder: I went thru a number of Sony RX100's including the ones with the popup viewfinder. While I too thought I'd never be happy without one, it turned out that I literally never used it. I gave it a go, of course, but on such a tiny camera it felt more like a gimmick than a useful tool.

As to the lack of interchangeable lenses: well, yes, but that's the whole point of a camera the size of a pack of cigarettes, eh?

I have a D800 and a slew of lenses for it: so much that they all have to be packed in a wheelie Pelican case. Going out to shoot requires a sherpa, or at least a car.

Even if I limit myself to one lens, that camera and a lens can come it at 6 pounds.

So: I wanted something better than an iPhone (just in case a "real" photo came along) yet small enough to simply keep it in my jacket pocket, and hence always with me. Another thought was that I'd rather look like an easily-dismissable tourist, than some photog with a ton of gear.

And the lenses on those little units are zooms, so you can do it with a button instead of your feet.

Upshot: with one (excellent) quality, but "luggable" camera, I decided for the opposite extreme instead of just a "more easily luggable" setup.

YMMV.

Tracy
www.valleau.art




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Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

Matt,

I will bring my Sony RX100II and a Samsung NX500 with a 16-50 kit lens (24-75mm equivalent)n and their accessories, when we next meet. I bought both for their quick autofocus and acceptable resolution. You may use them as long as you wish.

When will you next leave your warren in the woods? How about coffee?

Cheers,
David

On Tue, May 2, 2017 at 8:42 AM Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

I can certainly understand your conundrum, Matt. My thoughts, as followup, would be from my own experience.

Viewfinder: I went thru a number of Sony RX100's including the ones with the popup viewfinder. While I too thought I'd never be happy without one, it turned out that I literally never used it. I gave it a go, of course, but on such a tiny camera it felt more like a gimmick than a useful tool.

As to the lack of interchangeable lenses: well, yes, but that's the whole point of a camera the size of a pack of cigarettes, eh?

I have a D800 and a slew of lenses for it: so much that they all have to be packed in a wheelie Pelican case. Going out to shoot requires a sherpa, or at least a car.

Even if I limit myself to one lens, that camera and a lens can come it at 6 pounds.

So: I wanted something better than an iPhone (just in case a "real" photo came along) yet small enough to simply keep it in my jacket pocket, and hence always with me. Another thought was that I'd rather look like an easily-dismissable tourist, than some photog with a ton of gear.

And the lenses on those little units are zooms, so you can do it with a button instead of your feet.

Upshot: with one (excellent) quality, but "luggable" camera, I decided for the opposite extreme instead of just a "more easily luggable" setup.

YMMV.

Tracy
www.valleau.art




--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

Thanks Tracy. Your observation about a more easily luggable setup is a good one. If I’m going small, why not go small? Mr Clarkson has made me a generous offer to loan me some cameras, I’ll take him up on that and give it a field test.

Thanks for the thoughts,
Matt

On May 2, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

I can certainly understand your conundrum, Matt. My thoughts, as followup, would be from my own experience.

Viewfinder: I went thru a number of Sony RX100's including the ones with the popup viewfinder. While I too thought I'd never be happy without one, it turned out that I literally never used it. I gave it a go, of course, but on such a tiny camera it felt more like a gimmick than a useful tool.

As to the lack of interchangeable lenses: well, yes, but that's the whole point of a camera the size of a pack of cigarettes, eh?

I have a D800 and a slew of lenses for it: so much that they all have to be packed in a wheelie Pelican case. Going out to shoot requires a sherpa, or at least a car.

Even if I limit myself to one lens, that camera and a lens can come it at 6 pounds.

So: I wanted something better than an iPhone (just in case a "real" photo came along) yet small enough to simply keep it in my jacket pocket, and hence always with me. Another thought was that I'd rather look like an easily-dismissable tourist, than some photog with a ton of gear.

And the lenses on those little units are zooms, so you can do it with a button instead of your feet.

Upshot: with one (excellent) quality, but "luggable" camera, I decided for the opposite extreme instead of just a "more easily luggable" setup.

YMMV.

Tracy
www.valleau.art




--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery



--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com