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Reducing texture in scan of old photograph #reduce_texture

 

I have a few prints we scanned that have a severe texture (from the 1970's) that shows up dramatically. Have tried scanning at 90 degrees and 45 degrees and it still shows. I have tried a few things in PhotoShop but most just end up blurring the image. Have tried using a de-screening filter during the scan, same results.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate or drastically reduce it?

Mark

stillrivereditions.com

 

Hi Mark, and welcome! We're delighted to have you and your skills aboard :-)

As to the question:

First - I do not have direct experience with the problem, but that won't stop me from a bit of conjecture...

I suspect that the texture is too large to make de-noising software fruitful...

Then I thought about wetting the image, but realized promptly that's not likely practical with old prints.

My final thought was to dump the scanner and try photographing the image with a high-res camera, such as a D800, with a ring light on the lens.

I'm afraid that's it. Should I have an "aha!" moment, I'll post it.

Perhaps others here have run across the problem, unlike me, and will have a solution for you.

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery

On 3 Jun 2016, at 11:58, Mark Savoia wrote:

I have a few prints we scanned that have a severe texture (from the 1970's) that shows up dramatically. Have tried scanning at 90 degrees and 45 degrees and it still shows. I have tried a few things in PhotoShop but most just end up blurring the image. Have tried using a de-screening filter during the scan, same results.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate or drastically reduce it?

Mark

stillrivereditions.com
--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

 

I had this problem in the graphic design world trying to scan class photos printed on textured paper. Tracy’s solution of photographing the pictures instead of scanning helped a lot, but I still had to rubber stamp out some reflective spots. I also placed a piece of glass over the prints so they would lie flat, and photographed them in indirect light.

Z

Jeff Grant
 

The photo method works to a point. I had a 50'ish year old photo to copy recently. It was printed on textured paper which looked like golf balls up close. The solution was FFT and the best one I could find is in Affinity Photo  


Cheers,

Jeff

dcypaa
 

Mark,

I have the same problem. Have not found a satisfactory solution yet. Don't currently have access to Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), but have read elsewhere this is the best solution so far. Anyone know of a source for FFT that isn't too expensive?


dana

 

I did look at that option but it was way too confusing on how to use. You would think Adobe would have some filter by now, there must be plenty of people who have a need for this feature.

On Jun 4, 2016, at 7:48 AM, dcypaa <dcypaa@...> wrote:

Mark,

I have the same problem. Have not found a satisfactory solution yet. Don't currently have access to Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), but have read elsewhere this is the best solution so far. Anyone know of a source for FFT that isn't too expensive?


dana



 

I have tried shooting with a digital camera also. The surface of these prints are noting like I have seen before, the most god-awful texture, the service that made the prints years ago hopefully went out of business ;)

Mark
stillrivereditions.com

On Jun 3, 2016, at 3:31 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Hi Mark, and welcome! We're delighted to have you and your skills aboard :-)

As to the question:

First - I do not have direct experience with the problem, but that won't stop me from a bit of conjecture...

I suspect that the texture is too large to make de-noising software fruitful...

Then I thought about wetting the image, but realized promptly that's not likely practical with old prints.

My final thought was to dump the scanner and try photographing the image with a high-res camera, such as a D800, with a ring light on the lens.

I'm afraid that's it. Should I have an "aha!" moment, I'll post it.

Perhaps others here have run across the problem, unlike me, and will have a solution for you.

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery
--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com

 

Since polarizing filters don't fit on scanners, try scanning twice, once with the image vertical, and once horizontal. Rotate one, and align as layers in Photoshop. Simply setting the top layer to 50 transparency will already reduce the problem, but creating a mask, possibly from the difference mode, or some other technique that will look for what differs between the two, and remove it, would be your best bet. 

C. David Tobie
Senior Project Manager
Workflow & Color

Durst Phototechnik AG
Julius-Durst-Strasse 4
39042 Brixen, Italy
Telefon +39 04 72 81 01 11
Telefax +39 04 72 81 01 32
VAT Nr.: 00848170213
www.durst-online.com 
Email: cdtobie@...
skype: CDTobie

On Jun 4, 2016, at 7:55 AM, Mark Savoia <mark@...> wrote:

I did look at that option but it was way too confusing on how to use. You would think Adobe would have some filter by now, there must be plenty of people who have a need for this feature.


On Jun 4, 2016, at 7:48 AM, dcypaa <dcypaa@...> wrote:

Mark,

I have the same problem. Have not found a satisfactory solution yet. Don't currently have access to Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), but have read elsewhere this is the best solution so far. Anyone know of a source for FFT that isn't too expensive?


dana




--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com