Date   
Re: Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

 
Edited

OK: heading to bed, but I was curious. I see a very slight desaturation, but not enough to concern me. 


Here's a screenshot of PZP and PSCC side-by-side:


(larger version for download here: http://transfer.pronet.link/transfers/compare.jpg.zip)

hth


--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

 

Hi Jeff.  

I can't say that I've noticed that, but then I have not been looking for it either. Since it is cosmetic, I'd not worry about it (but I'll look anyway.)

Everyone will have a different use for PZP. FWIW, mine is strictly to enlarge an image. To that end, I do virtually nothing else in the software. Everything is set to Zero except sharpening, which I set to 41, which to my eye, is pretty close to the minimalist sharpening done by other's "raw presharpening." (I use S-spine Max for the algorithm.) I do all my "real" sharpening runs in other software.

My workflow, then, is to prepare the image for PZP in Photoshop/Affinity Photo/DxO or whatever; export as TIFF; run the extrapolation; and reload into Photoshop for final sharpening & tweaking.

YMMV.

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

Jeff Grant
 

So far, I have a mixed bag. When I open Photozoom my image becomes seriously desaturated. The colour is only affected when viewing. It's fine when I let it run. The good news is that the support folks have been very responsive, and helpful.

I wonder if I am alone with this issue.


Cheers,

Jeff

Re: Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

Jeff Grant
 

Thanks Tracy, that works. I’ll give it a try.
Cheers,

Jeff

On 19 Jul 2016, at 2:33 AM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Got a reply, and they sent this link:

https://www.benvista.com/discount/july2016newsletter



--
Tracy Valleau, moderator


Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery



Re: Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

 

Got a reply, and they sent this link:

https://www.benvista.com/discount/july2016newsletter



--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Back up storage

Jim Kasson
 

I tried to use Crashplan. I have a full-duplex 50 Mb/s fiber ISP link. Initially, upload speeds were in the 5 Mb/s region, but dropped lower and lower as time went by. After several months, my 6 TB backup was about a third done. The the desktop client program stopped working, and I never put much effort into getting it started again because the performance was so bad.

Crashplan used to offer to ship you a hard disk with your data for recovery, but they no longer do so. At the rates I saw -- assuming they applied to downloads -- it would take almost a year to recover 6 TB of data. 

I'm back to carting spinning rust 8TB drives back and forth from the safe deposit box.

Jim
--
Jim Kasson

ImageMaker

Blog: blog.kasson.com

Gallery: www.kasson.com

Re: Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

 

NO... that's weird. I got a 50% off email. Then, before I posted it, I checked the link, and the listed price was about $94.

Perhaps it's worth emailing them and asking about it**. The price was good until July 31, 2016.


**In fact... I just sent them an email, asking what's going on. I'll post back here as soon as I get a reply.

Sorry for the problem, but I cannot control what they do, of course.

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Silver grain resolution of films #filmresolution

Jim Kasson
 

The answer is highly scanner-dependent and image-dependent, and also on the effect you're trying to schieve. I have used drum scanners, Imacon/Hasselblad Flextight scanners, and flatbed scanners. 

Drum scanners are the most problematical with silver negs, although they do better with color, both chromes and negs. The collimated read beam does similar things to the image as a condenser head in an enlarger. Too big an aperture, and you miss detail. Too small an aperture, and you get an effect known as "grain aliasing". 

With the Imacon scanners, I used to scan at the maximum resolution that I wanted for the output file, and sort out the grain in post. The Imacon wasn't sharp enough to suffer from grain aliasing. 

With flatbed scanners, you should realize that many of them "achieve" the highest resolutions by interpolation. You can do that better in post. If you have such a scanner, I'd start at the highest native resolution, and see if the grain looks mushy. If it does, then you're probably not gonna get aliasing, and you can scan at that resolution, providing you want files that big. 

Eliminating all the visible grain at scan time is, IMHO, a really bad idea. There are things you can do in post that will damage the images much less than just lowering the scan resolution.

Jim
--
Jim Kasson

ImageMaker

Blog: blog.kasson.com

Gallery: www.kasson.com

Re: Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

Jeff Grant
 

Is 169 the discounted price. I can't see any mention of a discount. 

Photozoom Pro is 50% off until July 31.

 
Edited

No: I'm not shilling; no I don't get anything from mentioning this. BenVista's PhotoZoom Pro is, IMHO, the best of the extrapolators. Today I got an email announcing a 50% discount for a couple of weeks.

Here's the link:  https://www.benvista.com/discount/july2016newsletter


I've used it for years, and have posted (some time ago) my look at all the top extrapolators (BlowUp, etc) on my blog, here:

http://www.valleau.gallery/photoblog/?p=281

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Epson 1430 printing issue

 
Edited

If you had said just the end of the print, I'd conjecture something about a vacuum, or the carts not being ventilated properly. I'm not familiar with the 1430, so I don't know if it pressurized the carts, ala the pro systems. If not, then perhaps a bubble in the lines to the carts, or a crimp?

The one time I tried a CIS, it was important, as I recall, that the source tanks be at the same "elevation" as the fake cartridges. Too high, or too low, and the ink didn't flow properly.  HTH.
--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Epson 1430 printing issue

 

I have been working with supplier trying to get CISS system to work with my brand new Artisan 1430. I am now getting perfect nozzle checks after many cleanings and test prints to "work" the ink through.

But when starting to print I get ink starvation at beginning and end of print. Its only 8.5"x11" paper right now. But it is about 2" at start and finish.

Supplier is sending me individual refillable carts to try, but just wondering how others are doing with CISS systems and this printer.

Epson OEM carts print perfect.

-- 
Mark

stillrivereditions.com

Re: Silver grain resolution of films #filmresolution

 

I'd guess that it's going to be difficult to find, since the "best/maximum" is still a subjective decision about how much grain you want showing. That said, if you do find it, will you please post the URL here for others? :-)

Thanks!

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery

On 28 Jun 2016, at 13:30, Mark Savoia wrote:

Actually looking for the point in-between the "show the grain”,"hide the grain". The author on that page would describe it as "non-obtrusive gain”.

That webpage has some good info but I am looking for a listing of many films (color and b&w, trans and neg) that someone has documented. It must be out there someplace.

Mark
stillrivereditions.com


On Jun 28, 2016, at 4:00 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

First: I don't scan film, so I have no practical experience in doing it, but since I built my first darkroom nearly 60 years ago, and am now digital full time, I'd have to ask: scanning to what end? That is, do you want to show the grain, or hide the grain? The more you want the grain to show, the higher the scan resolution... all of which is tempered by grain size.

Perhaps this link will help: http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/menu_technic_optimalscanningresolution.htm

hth

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 28 Jun 2016, at 12:36, Mark Savoia wrote:

Does anyone know where to find a listing of what is maximum PPI to scan films based on their silver grain. I know Tri-X is around 2000ppi, but looking for data on other films.

Thanks.
--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com


--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com

--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Silver grain resolution of films #filmresolution

 

Actually looking for the point in-between the "show the grain”,"hide the grain". The author on that page would describe it as "non-obtrusive gain”.

That webpage has some good info but I am looking for a listing of many films (color and b&w, trans and neg) that someone has documented. It must be out there someplace.

Mark
stillrivereditions.com

On Jun 28, 2016, at 4:00 PM, Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

First: I don't scan film, so I have no practical experience in doing it, but since I built my first darkroom nearly 60 years ago, and am now digital full time, I'd have to ask: scanning to what end? That is, do you want to show the grain, or hide the grain? The more you want the grain to show, the higher the scan resolution... all of which is tempered by grain size.

Perhaps this link will help: http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/menu_technic_optimalscanningresolution.htm

hth

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery




On 28 Jun 2016, at 12:36, Mark Savoia wrote:

Does anyone know where to find a listing of what is maximum PPI to scan films based on their silver grain. I know Tri-X is around 2000ppi, but looking for data on other films.

Thanks.
--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com
--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com

Re: Silver grain resolution of films #filmresolution

 

First: I don't scan film, so I have no practical experience in doing it, but since I built my first darkroom nearly 60 years ago, and am now digital full time, I'd have to ask: scanning to what end? That is, do you want to show the grain, or hide the grain? The more you want the grain to show, the higher the scan resolution... all of which is tempered by grain size.

Perhaps this link will help: http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/menu_technic_optimalscanningresolution.htm

hth

Tracy
www.valleau.gallery

On 28 Jun 2016, at 12:36, Mark Savoia wrote:

Does anyone know where to find a listing of what is maximum PPI to scan films based on their silver grain. I know Tri-X is around 2000ppi, but looking for data on other films.

Thanks.
--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com
--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Silver grain resolution of films #filmresolution

 

Does anyone know where to find a listing of what is maximum PPI to scan films based on their silver grain. I know Tri-X is around 2000ppi, but looking for data on other films.

Thanks.
--
Mark

stillrivereditions.com

Re: Back up storage

 

Thank you to everyone who responded. After a bit more work I signed up with Crash Plan. First backup underway now running both the desktop and laptop. If I learn anything of interest I will pass it along.
Cheers,
David

On Tue, Jun 21, 2016 at 9:36 AM Tracy Valleau <tracy@...> wrote:

Mark's suggestion of cloud storage is a good one. There are lots to choose from. (I bought unlimited online storage from Amazon. I think it was $69 per year.)

One thing I neglected to mention regarding your drives is this: the more full a drive becomes, the slower writes will be. For a general running drive, leaving at least 10% free is wise. Trying to write data to drives that are basically full, even if you "delete a few files to make room," will be far slower than copying the same files to a drive that is, say, 50% full.


--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Back up storage

 

Mark's suggestion of cloud storage is a good one. There are lots to choose from. (I bought unlimited online storage from Amazon. I think it was $69 per year.)

One thing I neglected to mention regarding your drives is this: the more full a drive becomes, the slower writes will be. For a general running drive, leaving at least 10% free is wise. Trying to write data to drives that are basically full, even if you "delete a few files to make room," will be far slower than copying the same files to a drive that is, say, 50% full.
--
Tracy Valleau, moderator

Imagemakers

www.valleau.gallery

Re: Back up storage

 

Michael

The on-site/off-site alternating drive strategy has worked for decades, I agree. The basic concept of keeping a copy of the data in a second location remains important.

I think, though, that the advent of cloud backup makes the alternating drive strategy less attractive. That strategy has a couple of drawbacks, e.g. where to keep the off-site drive and overall forgetfulness/laziness in making the switch. The possibility of losing up to a week’s info is still there. Those problems are reduced with cloud backup. You don’t have to remember to switch drives. The time period of data loss is reduced. Crashplan runs pretty much continuously, for example, looking for files to upload. In short, it’s easier, less prone to user error, and as reliable.

Btw, I’m not saying Crashplan is definitely the way to go. There may be a better option. But, look for one that monitors certain folders for changes and automatically backs up changed files in those folders.

Cheers,
Matt

On Jun 21, 2016, at 7:17 AM, Michael Fryd <yahoo2@...> wrote:

A good backup strategy should minimize single points of failure that can cause complete data loss.

Generally “Backups” are for the active drive attached to your computer, and “archives” are offline storage of older files.

A simple but effective backup strategy is to have two external backup drives (let’s call them “Blue” and “Red”).

The Blue drive is kept off-site. The Red Drive is attached to the computer and you run incremental backups every night. Once a week you swap the drives - take the Red drive to the off-site location and bring back the Blue Drive. The Red and Blue disks should be different brands.

Explanation:

Incremental backups are preferred rather than copying the entire disk. An incremental backup copies only those items that were supposed to have changed. A full disk image copies everything. If there is hidden disk corruption on your master drive, a full disk copy will overwrite the good files on your backup with the corrupted file. An incremental backup won’t copy a file if the OS doesn’t think it has changed.

An offsite and offline copy makes it difficult for malware to delete or encrypt the data. If malware encrypts all your online data, your offsite copy should still be OK.

The Red and Blue disks should be different brands. This reduces the likelihood that a single manufacturing defect will cause both backup drives to fail at the same time.

One backup should always be offsite. A common cause of data loss is someone stealing your computer and the attached drives. Others are a roof leak, knocking over the table, and a fire. An offsite copy helps protect against these hazards.

When swapping backup drives, you should always bring the local disk to the remote site, and then the other remote disk back. You want to avoid the situation where all copies of the data are in the same place.



As to RAID devices, these are helpful, but do not eliminate the need for other backups. A RAID like device can protect you from data loss due to a single hard drive failure, but there are still many hazards that can cause the loss of all data on the RAID device. For example: the failure of the RAID controller, user error overwriting your master file with a low rez web image, someone knocking over the table, a roof leak, or theft.


Obviously, one can get even more carried away. For instance, you can add additional disks to the backup rotation, or make archive copies of your projects on other types of media (perhaps optical media).



When it comes to archiving, I suggest a similar strategy. Keep multiple copies in multiple locations. Every few years, merge your archives onto newer (larger media). The capacity of storage devices is increasing and price is going down. After a few years you should be able to copy multiple backup archives onto a single new storage device.

Archiving has other issues which add an additional challenge. Simply saving a file may not be enough, you may not have software that can read it. I have archived images on PhotoCD discs. I don’t have software that can read these files (Photoshop dropped support long ago). I have digital images from one of the first consumer digital cameras (Apple’s QuickTake 100). I no longer have software than can open these files. Actually, I still have the software, I no longer have a computer that can run the software.


Of course, the above is not the only reasonable strategy. There are many reasonable backup strategies. Depending on how important you data is, you can make a minimal effort, or go way overboard. You have to determine what it’s worth to you to protect your data.

The important concept in any good backup strategy is that it minimizes the chances you will lose your data.



--
Matt Connors

ImageMaker

www.inadvertentartist.com

Re: Back up storage

Michael Fryd
 

A good backup strategy should minimize single points of failure that can cause complete data loss.

Generally “Backups” are for the active drive attached to your computer, and “archives” are offline storage of older files.

A simple but effective backup strategy is to have two external backup drives (let’s call them “Blue” and “Red”).

The Blue drive is kept off-site. The Red Drive is attached to the computer and you run incremental backups every night. Once a week you swap the drives - take the Red drive to the off-site location and bring back the Blue Drive. The Red and Blue disks should be different brands.

Explanation:

Incremental backups are preferred rather than copying the entire disk. An incremental backup copies only those items that were supposed to have changed. A full disk image copies everything. If there is hidden disk corruption on your master drive, a full disk copy will overwrite the good files on your backup with the corrupted file. An incremental backup won’t copy a file if the OS doesn’t think it has changed.

An offsite and offline copy makes it difficult for malware to delete or encrypt the data. If malware encrypts all your online data, your offsite copy should still be OK.

The Red and Blue disks should be different brands. This reduces the likelihood that a single manufacturing defect will cause both backup drives to fail at the same time.

One backup should always be offsite. A common cause of data loss is someone stealing your computer and the attached drives. Others are a roof leak, knocking over the table, and a fire. An offsite copy helps protect against these hazards.

When swapping backup drives, you should always bring the local disk to the remote site, and then the other remote disk back. You want to avoid the situation where all copies of the data are in the same place.



As to RAID devices, these are helpful, but do not eliminate the need for other backups. A RAID like device can protect you from data loss due to a single hard drive failure, but there are still many hazards that can cause the loss of all data on the RAID device. For example: the failure of the RAID controller, user error overwriting your master file with a low rez web image, someone knocking over the table, a roof leak, or theft.


Obviously, one can get even more carried away. For instance, you can add additional disks to the backup rotation, or make archive copies of your projects on other types of media (perhaps optical media).



When it comes to archiving, I suggest a similar strategy. Keep multiple copies in multiple locations. Every few years, merge your archives onto newer (larger media). The capacity of storage devices is increasing and price is going down. After a few years you should be able to copy multiple backup archives onto a single new storage device.

Archiving has other issues which add an additional challenge. Simply saving a file may not be enough, you may not have software that can read it. I have archived images on PhotoCD discs. I don’t have software that can read these files (Photoshop dropped support long ago). I have digital images from one of the first consumer digital cameras (Apple’s QuickTake 100). I no longer have software than can open these files. Actually, I still have the software, I no longer have a computer that can run the software.


Of course, the above is not the only reasonable strategy. There are many reasonable backup strategies. Depending on how important you data is, you can make a minimal effort, or go way overboard. You have to determine what it’s worth to you to protect your data.

The important concept in any good backup strategy is that it minimizes the chances you will lose your data.