Tube or SS tuner / Which do you prefer? #poll-notice


mike gregory
 

 Do you prefer a tube FM tuner or a SS FM tuner for your listening pleasure?                    Power supplies excluded for "integrated" pieces.



A good video to watch on this very subject. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJR8tEYORzg

Results

See Who Responded


Radu Bogdan Dicher
 

Mike,
If you search the archives, there have been plenty of conversations on this, and related subjects. In your quest, you'll also see that there are - strong or fine - preferences for such tube tuners as McIntosh, while others - most - prefer a house like Sherwood or HH Scott. Then there's plenty of SS points to make, most typically aligning themselves on the milestones of radio and/or electronics, largely speaking. There's audiophile ears in this group, but even more so there's engineers and science-driven people, and overall a very eclectic, interesting crowd of seasoned tune-heads. For most of us, this poll just brings too rough a cut to the subject. 
My personal experience after starting to do my own alignments - with a different appreciation for tuner performance and "sound" - is that there's an infinite range of returns in both worlds. 
My 2c.
Radu. 

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 6:40 PM Robert Chambers <rchamber@...> wrote:
WTF for...why?  Who gives a flying flip?

I do not do polls.

I would suggest that you take it somewhere else.

RC in VT

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Rick Price
 

I get the nostalgia factor for tubes, but I think that individual tastes/eccentricities of human hearing set aside, a very large part of it IS nostalgia/ethos.  What's not is driven by the fetishing of tube/distortion characteristics by an Electric Guitar eccentric baby boom.  (Of which I'm a card-carrying member, whether I want to be or not.)  The truth appears to be that it doesn't change much over time.  I'm glad both are available for those who have preferences.  I own a couple of tube amps (good ones) just to have a toe in that water, but I'm never going to be
one of the "bloatey-fied midrange/mid-bass at the expense of both the top and bottom octaves plus my listening room running about ten degrees warmed than the rest of my home" converts.

Activity on the forums is a good thing and polls are obviously a feature designed to drive participation.

Another example: The folks who fetish certain Yamahas (I own a T-2 and like it a lot, but apart from the 7000, the rest seem to me be $15.99 '80s thrift store specials, but everyone's mileage varies) Mitsubishis (the ergonomics take them off the table for me, but as before, everyone's mileage varies) aren't being converted and I'm (TOTL Pioneer TX's, F-Elites and the Mac MR78) not changing many minds either.  It's nice to discuss the differences, along with perceived virtues and potential deficits. Nobody's being converted but polls don't really hurt anything to any degree that I can discern. Again, "everyone's, etc".

On the other hand, I'm pretty sick of polls in general.  I think we're seeing a burnout factor emerge.  Maybe to drive disengagement. Maybe it's something else.  There'll probably be a poll to try to establish some statistical data in order to shed light on it.  : - )

Rick Price




  


On Friday, July 31, 2020, 09:24:35 AM EDT, mike gregory via groups.io <mfgnyc@...> wrote:


Robert Chambers
Jul 30   #86888  

WTF for...why? Who gives a flying flip?

I do not do polls.

I would suggest that you take it somewhere else.

RC in VT

Why would you waste your time in responding to a question, if you don't want to participate in the discussion?


Mr Mr
 

For any qualified subjective judgement (as the sound is for the most part subjective) I would like to hear the proposals for the foolproof method to volume match the output of the each couple of tuner compared, to exactly same level. 
I happen to own couple of tube tuners, and to my ears, they both beat very decent, and some rare solid state models (one of them is rare, not the top of the line, such as Accuphase, but still). Both of those tube tuners do that in a different, and a bit unexpected ways. 

On Friday, July 31, 2020, 4:59:26 PM GMT+2, Rick Price via groups.io <ricktptman@...> wrote:


I get the nostalgia factor for tubes, but I think that individual tastes/eccentricities of human hearing set aside, a very large part of it IS nostalgia/ethos.  What's not is driven by the fetishing of tube/distortion characteristics by an Electric Guitar eccentric baby boom.  (Of which I'm a card-carrying member, whether I want to be or not.)  The truth appears to be that it doesn't change much over time.  I'm glad both are available for those who have preferences.  I own a couple of tube amps (good ones) just to have a toe in that water, but I'm never going to be
one of the "bloatey-fied midrange/mid-bass at the expense of both the top and bottom octaves plus my listening room running about ten degrees warmed than the rest of my home" converts.

Activity on the forums is a good thing and polls are obviously a feature designed to drive participation.

Another example: The folks who fetish certain Yamahas (I own a T-2 and like it a lot, but apart from the 7000, the rest seem to me be $15.99 '80s thrift store specials, but everyone's mileage varies) Mitsubishis (the ergonomics take them off the table for me, but as before, everyone's mileage varies) aren't being converted and I'm (TOTL Pioneer TX's, F-Elites and the Mac MR78) not changing many minds either.  It's nice to discuss the differences, along with perceived virtues and potential deficits. Nobody's being converted but polls don't really hurt anything to any degree that I can discern. Again, "everyone's, etc".

On the other hand, I'm pretty sick of polls in general.  I think we're seeing a burnout factor emerge.  Maybe to drive disengagement. Maybe it's something else.  There'll probably be a poll to try to establish some statistical data in order to shed light on it.  : - )

Rick Price




  


On Friday, July 31, 2020, 09:24:35 AM EDT, mike gregory via groups.io <mfgnyc@...> wrote:


Robert Chambers
Jul 30   #86888  

WTF for...why? Who gives a flying flip?

I do not do polls.

I would suggest that you take it somewhere else.

RC in VT

Why would you waste your time in responding to a question, if you don't want to participate in the discussion?


Ed
 

Audio is a hobby. No one hears the same music presentation as the next person sitting next to him or her.

Listen to what works best for you in your listening environment. Audio equipment that is operating correctly is the biggest factor for enjoying music. Vacuum tubes, Solid State or a combination of both.

On Jul 31, 2020, at 9:59 AM, Rick Price via groups.io <ricktptman@...> wrote:


I get the nostalgia factor for tubes, but I think that individual tastes/eccentricities of human hearing set aside, a very large part of it IS nostalgia/ethos.  What's not is driven by the fetishing of tube/distortion characteristics by an Electric Guitar eccentric baby boom.  (Of which I'm a card-carrying member, whether I want to be or not.)  The truth appears to be that it doesn't change much over time.  I'm glad both are available for those who have preferences.  I own a couple of tube amps (good ones) just to have a toe in that water, but I'm never going to be
one of the "bloatey-fied midrange/mid-bass at the expense of both the top and bottom octaves plus my listening room running about ten degrees warmed than the rest of my home" converts.

Activity on the forums is a good thing and polls are obviously a feature designed to drive participation.

Another example: The folks who fetish certain Yamahas (I own a T-2 and like it a lot, but apart from the 7000, the rest seem to me be $15.99 '80s thrift store specials, but everyone's mileage varies) Mitsubishis (the ergonomics take them off the table for me, but as before, everyone's mileage varies) aren't being converted and I'm (TOTL Pioneer TX's, F-Elites and the Mac MR78) not changing many minds either.  It's nice to discuss the differences, along with perceived virtues and potential deficits. Nobody's being converted but polls don't really hurt anything to any degree that I can discern. Again, "everyone's, etc".

On the other hand, I'm pretty sick of polls in general.  I think we're seeing a burnout factor emerge.  Maybe to drive disengagement. Maybe it's something else.  There'll probably be a poll to try to establish some statistical data in order to shed light on it.  : - )

Rick Price




  


On Friday, July 31, 2020, 09:24:35 AM EDT, mike gregory via groups.io <mfgnyc@...> wrote:


Robert Chambers
Jul 30   #86888  

WTF for...why? Who gives a flying flip?

I do not do polls.

I would suggest that you take it somewhere else.

RC in VT

Why would you waste your time in responding to a question, if you don't want to participate in the discussion?


Mr Mr
 

Still, there might be ways for documenting the findings by making the quality digital recordings of the - say - two tuners at a time, off of the same antenna. 

The recording devices I got at home are the same model, so they can be connected to the respective tuner with same cables. 

Both tuners would be getting the signal of off the same antenna. The problem is that any serious evaluation would require either the careful volume matching of the output of the tuners, or possible equaling the volume level of both recordings. The first method would be the more difficult one, but also the better solution. 

Any poll would be more interesting then. 

There is also a question of the adequate sample- and bitrate of the digital recording, I would guess the 48kHz sampling rate would be to prefer instead of 44.1 kHz. 

But this proposal is rather naïve, I am fully aware of it, but still perhaps something to think about. 

From my humble experience, there are actually differences in the sound. I have resumed just in a couple of last days the comparisons, and have been surprised by the differences in sound between some tuners, actually. 


On Friday, July 31, 2020, 5:18:09 PM GMT+2, Ed via groups.io <absco.ed@...> wrote:


Audio is a hobby. No one hears the same music presentation as the next person sitting next to him or her.

Listen to what works best for you in your listening environment. Audio equipment that is operating correctly is the biggest factor for enjoying music. Vacuum tubes, Solid State or a combination of both.

On Jul 31, 2020, at 9:59 AM, Rick Price via groups.io <ricktptman@...> wrote:


I get the nostalgia factor for tubes, but I think that individual tastes/eccentricities of human hearing set aside, a very large part of it IS nostalgia/ethos.  What's not is driven by the fetishing of tube/distortion characteristics by an Electric Guitar eccentric baby boom.  (Of which I'm a card-carrying member, whether I want to be or not.)  The truth appears to be that it doesn't change much over time.  I'm glad both are available for those who have preferences.  I own a couple of tube amps (good ones) just to have a toe in that water, but I'm never going to be
one of the "bloatey-fied midrange/mid-bass at the expense of both the top and bottom octaves plus my listening room running about ten degrees warmed than the rest of my home" converts.

Activity on the forums is a good thing and polls are obviously a feature designed to drive participation.

Another example: The folks who fetish certain Yamahas (I own a T-2 and like it a lot, but apart from the 7000, the rest seem to me be $15.99 '80s thrift store specials, but everyone's mileage varies) Mitsubishis (the ergonomics take them off the table for me, but as before, everyone's mileage varies) aren't being converted and I'm (TOTL Pioneer TX's, F-Elites and the Mac MR78) not changing many minds either.  It's nice to discuss the differences, along with perceived virtues and potential deficits. Nobody's being converted but polls don't really hurt anything to any degree that I can discern. Again, "everyone's, etc".

On the other hand, I'm pretty sick of polls in general.  I think we're seeing a burnout factor emerge.  Maybe to drive disengagement. Maybe it's something else.  There'll probably be a poll to try to establish some statistical data in order to shed light on it.  : - )

Rick Price




  


On Friday, July 31, 2020, 09:24:35 AM EDT, mike gregory via groups.io <mfgnyc@...> wrote:


Robert Chambers
Jul 30   #86888  

WTF for...why? Who gives a flying flip?

I do not do polls.

I would suggest that you take it somewhere else.

RC in VT

Why would you waste your time in responding to a question, if you don't want to participate in the discussion?


Mac
 

I don’t think I’ve ever heard a tube tuner....


R.Kent Brown
 

I would like to present an option for those who are “tired of” or want to protest the request of your opinions in a pole:simply don’t reply. The member who asked wanted your input and DIDN'T ask or need your negativity toward his post. My opinion is that all members owe each other the respect of responding to another member’s request or why else would you want to be a member of a group? 


On Jul 31, 2020, at 12:39 PM, Mac <macbradley@...> wrote:

I don’t think I’ve ever heard a tube tuner....


sedond
 

the best sounding tuna i've ever heard have members of both categories.  reception-wise, the s/s units win.

doug s.

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 04:51 PM, mike gregory wrote:

Vote

1. I prefer a tube FM tuner.
2. I prefer a SS FM tuner.


newaag
 

Doug, in case in never did this before, it is long overdue.
"I hereby bestow upon you my official Tuner Dude approval -
"high five, you made it brother! - <slap!>" May the airwaves meet
your antenna with with maximum resonance at your favorite station,
and may DX tropo events occur frequently wherever you may be. Happy
tuning."

from the old days, when we all used joke around about being a real "tuner dude". TO achive that status, one needed to own -
A tube tuner
A nice digital
A nice vintage '70's analog
https://groups.io/g/FMtuners/message/7041?p=,,,20,0,0,0::Created,,tuner+dude,20,2,0,35046431,d=6,startdate=07/31/2001,enddate=07/31/2008&d=6&startdate=07/31/2001&enddate=07/31/2008
Bob


ke2ge@yahoo.com <ke2ge@...>
 

I have a nice collection of quality tube & solid-state tuners, and used to critically listen to FM allot.  Unfortunately,  here in Rochester NY, the FM band is being taken over by "religious" broadcasters and conservative talk radio, just like what happened to the AM & shortwave bands.  Many of the remaining stations are tough to listen to due to compression, processing, and uninteresting programming.  WXXI-FM, the PBS classical station, varies in quality and content.  I have a good collection of music in many formats, which I prefer.  These days, I rarely listen to FM anymore.  Tubes or solid-state?   Neither.


John Ess
 

As far as sound quality goes, it's not always easy to find the sweet spot between tube "warmth" and "euphonics" and solid state "accuracy" and "detail". I'm quite pleased with the AQ of the KT-8300 after I've gotten done modding, as it's gotten pretty close to that sweet spot. And as far as RF performance goes, SS would probably have an edge over thermionic emissive devices when it comes to VHF frequencies. Now I realize there will always be the odd exception...so go easy.


Joseph Strickland
 

John;

Like you, I have a Kenwood KT-9900, which is virtually identical to the KT-8300 except for the front panel and having the capability of operating on 250VAC or 125VAC. I have been so pleased with its overall performance that I have not yet undertaken any modifications. Out of the box after its purchase from eBay, it performs so well and sounds so good. It replaced two KT-7500 units with a few mods and is just enough better that I can receive the one desired station I like with more complete limiting when the signal level drops. The solid state tuners with ceramic IF filters, especially those from the mid-1970s through the early 1980s seem to be some of the best ever made. I prefer the analog designs rather than the digital PLL units for their ability to be tuned for quietest overall reception consistend with lowest distortion. There are some tube type tuners with 4 tuned RF circuits that have good IF selectivity. but I have not been able to test all of those. There are a number of high end tube type FM tuners which go for high dollars even today. It would be good to hear from those who own such units as to their ability to reject adjacent channel and alternate channel signals. The FM band is much more crowded these days than it was when many of the tube type tuners were manufactured.

One of our members has commented in the past that no FM tuner is worth $1000 or more, partly due to the kind of programming available these days. I tend to agree. I have bought a number of tube type FM or AM/FM tuners to restore and try out and so far I am not finding very many that can perform as well as many solid state tuners with such a crowded FM band. I do use a multi-element outside antenna to aid in receiving the stations I like.

Joe
KC5LY


Ed
 

Gentleman - I am fortunate enough to live a Line of sight over the air distance of about 60 miles south east of downtown Chicago IL. We can still enjoy reasonable FM quiet stereo broadcasts. Most notable is; WFMT.

As for SS vs vacuum tube tuners. Again I have been fortunate enough to collect many of the so called sought after tuners from the 1950’s to the 2000’s.

The ones I listen to most often are the Kenwood KT-917 SS, Marantz 10br a broadcast model VT, Tandberg 3001 SS, Fisher 1000 VT and a Sherwood Drake 100 SS.

I have literally enjoyed inexpensive SS and VT tuners all different manufacturers America and overseas.

I found the most important part of good FM tuner performance is paying close attention to your selection of antenna and having a high quality shielded cable without any spliced connections between the antenna to as close to your tuner or tuners as possible.

Very rare and occasionally WFMT will broadcast a live concert. A truly great experience for over the air radio. Any and all of the tuners I’ve listed above plus many others just sing.

On Aug 1, 2020, at 7:13 AM, Joseph Strickland via groups.io <strijw426@...> wrote:

John;

Like you, I have a Kenwood KT-9900, which is virtually identical to the KT-8300 except for the front panel and having the capability of operating on 250VAC or 125VAC. I have been so pleased with its overall performance that I have not yet undertaken any modifications. Out of the box after its purchase from eBay, it performs so well and sounds so good. It replaced two KT-7500 units with a few mods and is just enough better that I can receive the one desired station I like with more complete limiting when the signal level drops. The solid state tuners with ceramic IF filters, especially those from the mid-1970s through the early 1980s seem to be some of the best ever made. I prefer the analog designs rather than the digital PLL units for their ability to be tuned for quietest overall reception consistend with lowest distortion. There are some tube type tuners with 4 tuned RF circuits that have good IF selectivity. but I have not been able to test all of those. There are a number of high end tube type FM tuners which go for high dollars even today. It would be good to hear from those who own such units as to their ability to reject adjacent channel and alternate channel signals. The FM band is much more crowded these days than it was when many of the tube type tuners were manufactured.

One of our members has commented in the past that no FM tuner is worth $1000 or more, partly due to the kind of programming available these days. I tend to agree. I have bought a number of tube type FM or AM/FM tuners to restore and try out and so far I am not finding very many that can perform as well as many solid state tuners with such a crowded FM band. I do use a multi-element outside antenna to aid in receiving the stations I like.

Joe
KC5LY


mike gregory
 

Audio is a hobby. No one hears the same music presentation as the next person sitting next to him or her.  Ed

 Astute observation there Ed and 100% true. 

 The old codger in the video owns PS Audio. Paul has been producing high end, SS only, sound reproduction pieces for the last 40 plus years now. Bascom King, who has designed audio pieces for top line manufacturers such as Constellation Audio and has been in the design business since SS pieces were coming into vogue in the audiophile world. Bascom has 50+ years of actual real World design experience for top end manufacturers, while getting paid rather handsomely for his toils. Bascom prefers the tube over the SS pieces. Of course Bascom isn't the Oracle of Delphi in his opinions. But he does have actual real World working knowledge that very few people in this audio environment have, including myself. So I give Bascom's opinions a little more weight, then most other's opinions who don't have these same credentials as Bascom does in these matters. YMMV. Bascom designed the first hybrid tube/SS amp for Infinity, IIRC.

During the blind shoot described in that linked video, it must have come as a very big surprise to the owner of PS Audio, that the tube version of his no cost spared amp, sounded better with tubes in it, then it did with SS pieces in it. Going against 40 years of your own business model and actually admitting that your perceptions that you have been exalting for 40 years, were actually wrong, must have come as a big surprise. I give Paul credit for admitting that the tube version of this no cost spared amp sounded better then the SS version. At least Paul didn't have regimented thinking, putting aside preconceived notions and actually went into the blind sound test with an open mind. These traits have always been in short supply in Humans. But as Ed observed earlier, no 2 people hear the music the same.


Rick Price
 

Agreed on all counts.  I've had this conversation on the Zenith TO group and other FM groups on other platforms.  Content quality is the BIG deficit these days.  But, it's also a problem on Internet Radio as well. (600,000 more versions of the same thing isn't an improvement.) There are a few geographic areas where (I'll just call it "self-conscious" and leave it at that) programming choices for (especially) Jazz (but to a lesser degree Classical-i.e., the hyper-wealthy Blue-haired Widow patroness's penchant for Mozart and Pachelbel's Greatest Hit) are EXTREMELY narrow and only avail themselves of a "certain approved" range of artists and composers.

I've posted about this in past years but Jim Wilkie's Seattle PRI show "Jazz After Hours" would program every kind of group that was GOOD, irrespective of if a media company conglomerate was pushing a repackaging/new release or not.  You were just as likely to hear Roulette Basie/Ferguson, Phillips/Columbia 60's Woody Herman as you were any era of Ellington or any Jazz Trio, Quartet or Quintet one can think to name.  The pattern was there was NO Pattern.  (Or at least, less of one.)  I used to hear things as diverse as Johnny Richards, Lou Rawls, Onzy Matthews, Kenton, along with more "audio snob" eccentric staples from records such as (but not limited to) "Kind Of Blue".  Which, I hasten to add that I like very much, it's just the subject of WAAAYYYY too much airplay overexposure.

Contrastingly, there is a tremendous wealth of great Music (the quality of the uploads is a different conversation) that doesn't see the light of day on broadcast formats exclusive of YouTube.  Which means that platform's relevance has been the savior of a LOT of great Music that FM, for whatever reasons, but I suspect has something to do with politically overfunded, communication media mega conglomerates wishing to "choke" the last remaining life out of the LAST broadcast formats that allow for free access-exclusive of owning the receiver. 

I'm not singularly hostile to faith-based or News/Talk Radio, but very little of it is of a quality that I consider to be engaging, relevant, or even especially factually literate.  If those types of offerings were of better quality (this is NOT favoring a spot on the ideological spectrum, I have NO place to call political "home" and haven't had for some time) I think they would not be as incendiary and needlessly offensive as many of them take pride in being.

As I've heard and read elsewhere: If I were an extraterrestrial and happened through this part of our outer spiral arm and heard all this SILLINESS on the EM spectrum, I'd just stay on the Hyperspace Bypass until the next area rest stop.  Barnard's Star or Sirius B, maybe...

YMMV,

Rick Price

On Saturday, August 1, 2020, 06:05:50 AM EDT, ke2ge@... via groups.io <ke2ge@...> wrote:


I have a nice collection of quality tube & solid-state tuners, and used to critically listen to FM allot.  Unfortunately,  here in Rochester NY, the FM band is being taken over by "religious" broadcasters and conservative talk radio, just like what happened to the AM & shortwave bands.  Many of the remaining stations are tough to listen to due to compression, processing, and uninteresting programming.  WXXI-FM, the PBS classical station, varies in quality and content.  I have a good collection of music in many formats, which I prefer.  These days, I rarely listen to FM anymore.  Tubes or solid-state?   Neither.


gpdavis2
 

Was not going to get involved, but what the heck. Have owned McIntosh, Sherwood and H-K tube tuners and Sony, Accuphase, Denon, Yamaha, McIntosh & Luxman solid-state tuners. Have had many, if not most, recapped, aligned & retubed by various known-good tuners techs. I've yet to have a tube tuner that I preferred to the better solid-state for either reception abilities or musicality in my 'not too difficult' listening area with good FM stations available. I'm down to just two.......... the Sony ST-J75 & Yamaha T-2 (both fully up-dated & aligned). Only other tuner I can imagine owning these days is either the Accuphase T-1100 or T-1200. But, the $$penalty for them is simply too great. For me, it is solid-state. I need a pair of Cornwall IVs, first. ;-) YMMV.
Glenn


newaag
 

Thanks for keeping it good here folks. This may go in the wrong way in some groups, but not here...
:-)
Some may wonder where this came from -
A tube tuner
A nice digital
A nice vintage '70's analog
so, here is my personal observations from 2003, which still hold today -

tube -
For my ears, a tube tuner gives the best presentation of classical music, especially massed strings, violins, horns, woodwinds, etc. - but as noted, needs decently strong signal of good quality to shine. Depending on location, this can mean a multi-element rotor mounted outdoor antenna, which usually also sidesteps the selectivity downfalls of most tube tuners.   

nice digital -
This means a top shelf digital with wide narrow IF, and lots of features, in many cases a remote control -
This is, depending on implementation, can be of the best overall choices, as it gives
a) convenience - memory presets for quick and easy scanning of all saved channels, even more convenient with a remote
b) good reception - in many cases, rivals the best analog tuners for sensitivity and selectivity, if setup correctly (this is important)
c) great sound - usually with mods, which can be easy or hard, depending in the model.

nice vintage 70's analog -
Meaning a top shelf analog tuner, usually with 5 gangs or more, and nice things like wide narrow IF, blend, etc.
Basically the same reasons as digital, without the convenience of a remote and presets. But usually much easier to setup (mod and align) than digital units, and far more examples available, usually at lower a cost. The ability to manually fine tune is usually lacking in many digital models, but no problem with analog tuners. In many cases, depending on models, can sound better than digital tuners after easy mods. Alignment is usually easy, and filter replacement too, as no matching to a crystal oscillator needed.
Bob 


Rick Price
 

Just for clarification's sake (I get in a hurry when the breakfast call comes through from downstairs):

1. I meant to say that there were a few geographical areas that "AREN'T extremely narrow".  But where I live isn't one of them. In fact, it nearly doesn't exist at all here now, good bad or indifferent.  Classical's a little bit better (WFDD 88.5Mhz Winston-Salem, NC) and there's one "decent" (but heavily repetitive) OTA commercial alternative left:  WXRC 95.7Mhz (Hickory, NC)

2.  I meant to specify that Youtube features content that FM Radio (Hybrid Digital included, which is another technology I have essentially zero interest in) chooses to ignore.

All that would be required would be for the programming to be less restricted in terms of IP/mechanical compensation. My Brass Quintet performed live on a (50th, I think) Anniversary radio program some years ago (WBT-FM/AM) and the host of the time (a good friend of mine) almost had puppies because he worried that the ragtime arrangement we performed might be under copyright. It wasn't-the tune was "That's A-Plenty". (But the arrangement wasn't as old as the tune.)  I think his producer was the one having puppies, frankly.

 If most folks already own physical copies (or even downloads) of this music-or can access it on other platforms, what's the big holdback for broadcasting it over the air? That is, if not to kill analog FM off for the sake of expanded Wi-Fi (privatized/fee-based) bandwidth.  Non-single release songs from Billboard Top 100 ALBUMS over the last 70 years could generate a lot of new interest AND drive new generations of physical media sales.  I don't hear much of that anywhere, online or off-exclusive of YouTube.  At the very least, it couldn't hurt.

Once my two slices of Bacon are on the table waiting, my proofreading skills drop dramatically.  (Sorry, everyone.)

Off-soapbox.  Carry on...stay safe...


Rick Price



daveyst
 
Edited

 

As a fellow resident of Rochester, I have to point out that listener-supported 90.1 is still playing the widest selection of jazz, including Zappa’s computerized compositions, avant-garde electronica and drummer extraordinaire Steve Curry, playing with Gap Mangione on a live session outdoors, by the Lake O.  All this over an uncompressed band.  I find I listen more to jazz these days, as the variety offered is often surprising and usually very well performed. 

 

There is also Toronto’s 103.1 for the best classical.  I find it determinate to clean sound to both position the elements, and click the fine-tuning dial on my 1970 RCA brass element antenna, connected to a SONY XDR S10HDIP tabletop w/remote.  This makes for excellent nighttime listening.  The rarer music is played then.

 

There is a hogging of the frequencies by religious broadcasters in this town, at least. This brings to mind the question of whether such is or should be permitted under FCC licensing rules.  My guess is that as long as the  frequency is not occupado, it’s for sale.  I find no fewer than seven on the FM band (including one on HD.  Now there’s a portion of FMdom in a sad state).  I thought the religious stations were all identical, not so.  It is tedious to hear, but the better ones do delve some into philosophical aspects of spirituality, and the matching of time-shifting verses is compelling when coupled with promises of eternal damnation, and rarely, reward. [RELIGIOUS COMMENTARY DELETED BY MODERATOR]

 

There are several new stations available.  Try 106.3, 102.3 and 107.7 (not so much new as improved).  Lots of variety with rampant, entertaining propaganda (i.e. college kids).  There are also our two major college stations, R.I.T. and U.R., one with uncompressed signaling and one in HD.   Both have been captured by PBS.

[POLITICAL COMMENTARY DELETED BY MODERATOR]