Topics

Emco Compact 5 CNC options

marc mcphee
 

Hello all.

I’m new to this so please be gentle, I have an Emco Compact 5 CNC with a 6 tool turret(the yellow one). It is decent condition and I would like to retrofit it to be able write programs in G-code format. I would like to teach my son my trade as a CNC machinist to help him pay his way through university or even to open his eyes to the world of manufacturing.

So I have been online looking at how the set up goes together from the BOB to the required motors to a VDF to control the spindle etc etc. I have the basics together but I I’m still learning what goes with what.

So here goes, I’m at best a bit of an idiot so help with how you have done with your set up or what you used with what would be a lot of help.

I was told to stay away from BOBs tb6560 when retrofitting a lathe due to not being that user friendly ?? Is Centroid acorn a better alternative or will a simple BOB effectively achieve the same results ?? do I need a 24vdc power box l to control the bob and motors and another to control the spindle using  a VFD.

I need help, guidance and I was hoping to maintain a budget between £400-£600.

Thank you all in advance for any help

David Rabenius
 

OK:
  Here goes. Your budget is tight, $771.00 but you probably wont be using Centroid Acorn. There are many options for doing retrofits. You could save a few bucks and use the factory power supply. The spindle motor controller could also be used if my memory serves me correct. I know the later PCturn50 & 55 machines better.
   Power supplies are pretty cheap, $50.00 - $100. VFD's are also $100 - $140.00. Steppers can be from $ 30.00 to $200. you don't need huge 280oz. ones as the factory ones were about 60 oz inch. Too powerful steppers could easily damage the machine. BOB boards can be had for $150.  & up. Find someone who has done a complete retrofit and if you can see it run, they would be the best bet.
 I bought a CNC5 in 1996 and made many parts on it, it was my first CNC Lathe. programming it was slow but tolerable. I saved my programs on the little Phillips Digital tapes that are like finding hens teeth. Your machine may have the RS232 pigtail on the back, if so then you can use a common old school printer cable and upload the programs from a PC. EMCO had some software that could make your drawings and it would generate the code. The software was DOS based and was fast & easy to learn. I bought a PC5 in 2001 which used that software.
   The lathe you have uses G codes, many common ones found in industry. Like most CNC machines EMCO used several canned cycles, most CNC machines use certain G-code numbers that are "open" to the manufacturer to make custom for their application.
 If your machine is working then why not learn it the way it was?? I know of several people who took perfectly good running machines and made them non-running ones. Did you get the manuals with your machine?? If not they are available online, the software is also available online. The manual explains the setup of the software to the machine.

Dave
 



On Monday, November 25, 2019, 01:49:02 PM EST, marc mcphee via Groups.Io <sparkez01@...> wrote:


Hello all.

I’m new to this so please be gentle, I have an Emco Compact 5 CNC with a 6 tool turret(the yellow one). It is decent condition and I would like to retrofit it to be able write programs in G-code format. I would like to teach my son my trade as a CNC machinist to help him pay his way through university or even to open his eyes to the world of manufacturing.

So I have been online looking at how the set up goes together from the BOB to the required motors to a VDF to control the spindle etc etc. I have the basics together but I I’m still learning what goes with what.

So here goes, I’m at best a bit of an idiot so help with how you have done with your set up or what you used with what would be a lot of help.

I was told to stay away from BOBs tb6560 when retrofitting a lathe due to not being that user friendly ?? Is Centroid acorn a better alternative or will a simple BOB effectively achieve the same results ?? do I need a 24vdc power box l to control the bob and motors and another to control the spindle using  a VFD.

I need help, guidance and I was hoping to maintain a budget between £400-£600.

Thank you all in advance for any help

Tony Schalburg <tonyschalburg@...>
 

Hi
Im the happy owner of 4 emco machines. 
One et120p, 
One compact 6
One vmc100 
Those 3 with original tm02 controller. 
The last one is a vmc100 im in proces of retrofitting. 
Its a huge proces to retrofit a mill, and expencive, cuz i want to keep the original berger lahr steppers and the Siemens dc motor. No compromices here. Want to run the vmc100 with Mach3, as close to the original setup as possible. 
The ATC, i had a plugin made, cost me 200$.
Stepper drivers, i use original from berger lahr, but updated, cost 600$ each. Siemens dc motor, im using a parker 506 dc driver, cost 400£.
Pwm,relay board and BOB, i got from cnc4pc, all for about 400$.
I have been working on the retrofit for more than a year now, but Will soon complete it. 
What i want to say, about retrofitting those Nice old machines, is, if you want to do it, do it prober, so you have a machine that can and Will work for many years to come. 
Yes you can do a cheap retrofit, but then you get a slow machine, that can do the job, but the emco machines Are Nice High pression machines, that deserves a prober setup. 
Tony

David Rabenius
 

Hi All:
  I forgot to mention that if you are making small batches of parts for sale then the retrofit cost is of little concern. I bought a PC5 Lathe and before I even ran it for the first time had a local guy contact me about turning some Lexan rod for a Army project. I ran like 3 parts then he came back and told me to run the rest of the material, like 8 parts total. He told me that he couldn't get any machine shop in the area to do it and he basically paid for the cost of the machine which I thought was pretty cool.  
  When I started it was really convenient to just go and make my own parts as needed, always thinking of what to make next. I was at my local restaurant and one of the owners approached me about a project that he wanted to do. It was a Brass knuckle bottle opener. I asked him if he had a drawing of what he wanted, he said no. I told him to use the TV on the Bar to do a Google search for Brass Knuckles. He did so and found a style that he liked. I sketched  the opener he had on one end of the Brass Knuckle. Then asked if it was what he wanted. I went home and did the CAD drawing & CAM that evening. Next afternoon I ran one on my PCmill50 and he was floored when I brought one to him that evening. Look under Drinique drink wear, knucle opener.
  That's how I started machining, local machine shops weren't interested in doing batches of parts, their attitudes left a  lot to be desired. I had one part that was for 100 pcs @ $35.00 each. I figured that I could just buy a Lathe & mill for that and these EMCO CNC machines were perfect. One of the Machine shops told me to bring in the parts that I had made and when they saw it offered me a job on the spot.

On Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 09:56:38 AM EST, Tony Schalburg via Groups.Io <tonyschalburg@...> wrote:


Hi
Im the happy owner of 4 emco machines. 
One et120p, 
One compact 6
One vmc100 
Those 3 with original tm02 controller. 
The last one is a vmc100 im in proces of retrofitting. 
Its a huge proces to retrofit a mill, and expencive, cuz i want to keep the original berger lahr steppers and the Siemens dc motor. No compromices here. Want to run the vmc100 with Mach3, as close to the original setup as possible. 
The ATC, i had a plugin made, cost me 200$.
Stepper drivers, i use original from berger lahr, but updated, cost 600$ each. Siemens dc motor, im using a parker 506 dc driver, cost 400£.
Pwm,relay board and BOB, i got from cnc4pc, all for about 400$.
I have been working on the retrofit for more than a year now, but Will soon complete it. 
What i want to say, about retrofitting those Nice old machines, is, if you want to do it, do it prober, so you have a machine that can and Will work for many years to come. 
Yes you can do a cheap retrofit, but then you get a slow machine, that can do the job, but the emco machines Are Nice High pression machines, that deserves a prober setup. 
Tony

David Rabenius
 

On Wednesday, November 27, 2019, 02:20:43 AM EST, David Rabenius via Groups.Io <swedeson2002@...> wrote:


Hi All:
  I forgot to mention that if you are making small batches of parts for sale then the retrofit cost is of little concern. I bought a PC5 Lathe and before I even ran it for the first time had a local guy contact me about turning some Lexan rod for a Army project. I ran like 3 parts then he came back and told me to run the rest of the material, like 8 parts total. He told me that he couldn't get any machine shop in the area to do it and he basically paid for the cost of the machine which I thought was pretty cool.  
  When I started it was really convenient to just go and make my own parts as needed, always thinking of what to make next. I was at my local restaurant and one of the owners approached me about a project that he wanted to do. It was a Brass knuckle bottle opener. I asked him if he had a drawing of what he wanted, he said no. I told him to use the TV on the Bar to do a Google search for Brass Knuckles. He did so and found a style that he liked. I sketched  the opener he had on one end of the Brass Knuckle. Then asked if it was what he wanted. I went home and did the CAD drawing & CAM that evening. Next afternoon I ran one on my PCmill50 and he was floored when I brought one to him that evening. Look under Drinique drink wear, knucle opener.
  That's how I started machining, local machine shops weren't interested in doing batches of parts, their attitudes left a  lot to be desired. I had one part that was for 100 pcs @ $35.00 each. I figured that I could just buy a Lathe & mill for that and these EMCO CNC machines were perfect. One of the Machine shops told me to bring in the parts that I had made and when they saw it offered me a job on the spot.
On Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 09:56:38 AM EST, Tony Schalburg via Groups.Io <tonyschalburg@...> wrote:


Hi
Im the happy owner of 4 emco machines. 
One et120p, 
One compact 6
One vmc100 
Those 3 with original tm02 controller. 
The last one is a vmc100 im in proces of retrofitting. 
Its a huge proces to retrofit a mill, and expencive, cuz i want to keep the original berger lahr steppers and the Siemens dc motor. No compromices here. Want to run the vmc100 with Mach3, as close to the original setup as possible. 
The ATC, i had a plugin made, cost me 200$.
Stepper drivers, i use original from berger lahr, but updated, cost 600$ each. Siemens dc motor, im using a parker 506 dc driver, cost 400£.
Pwm,relay board and BOB, i got from cnc4pc, all for about 400$.
I have been working on the retrofit for more than a year now, but Will soon complete it. 
What i want to say, about retrofitting those Nice old machines, is, if you want to do it, do it prober, so you have a machine that can and Will work for many years to come. 
Yes you can do a cheap retrofit, but then you get a slow machine, that can do the job, but the emco machines Are Nice High pression machines, that deserves a prober setup. 
Tony

David Rabenius
 


 I had to actually shrink the length down to fit the 7.500 X axis travel of the PCmill50.  (counting the 3\8 endmill)
 I did the finger holes first then screwed down the plate with plugs matched to the finger holes on a base plate, worked really well but SLOW. The flip side was done the same way for doing the chamfer. I used the 2 outer finger holes with plugs to position then clamped the outside edge. Removed the outer plugs  then then chamfered the finger holes. I reclamped the finger hole plugs and chamfered the outer profile. The finger plugs had a tight fit with a chamfer to lock the part to my fixture. Another job that required some thought.
  I did another job on the PC50 mill with the headstock at a 90 degree Horizontal angle for threading a Aluminum tube. I called EMCO and asked them how to do it. They had no clue and a local friend of mine drew up the thread as a helix on its side and made the G-code file using Maxnc software. It took a little tweeking but worked perfectly. The G-code files were huge, like 7000 lines of code which was about 10 minutes of machining time. It was VERY impressive watching the X,Y, & Z numbers fly on the monitor as the mill cut the 50mm X 1.50 metric thread. 

Dave


On Wednesday, November 27, 2019, 02:25:40 AM EST, David Rabenius via Groups.Io <swedeson2002@...> wrote:


Hi;
  Heres a link to the knuckle opener. He has sold hundreds of these, he uses a Fadal full size CNC mill.





On Wednesday, November 27, 2019, 02:20:43 AM EST, David Rabenius via Groups.Io <swedeson2002@...> wrote:


Hi All:
  I forgot to mention that if you are making small batches of parts for sale then the retrofit cost is of little concern. I bought a PC5 Lathe and before I even ran it for the first time had a local guy contact me about turning some Lexan rod for a Army project. I ran like 3 parts then he came back and told me to run the rest of the material, like 8 parts total. He told me that he couldn't get any machine shop in the area to do it and he basically paid for the cost of the machine which I thought was pretty cool.  
  When I started it was really convenient to just go and make my own parts as needed, always thinking of what to make next. I was at my local restaurant and one of the owners approached me about a project that he wanted to do. It was a Brass knuckle bottle opener. I asked him if he had a drawing of what he wanted, he said no. I told him to use the TV on the Bar to do a Google search for Brass Knuckles. He did so and found a style that he liked. I sketched  the opener he had on one end of the Brass Knuckle. Then asked if it was what he wanted. I went home and did the CAD drawing & CAM that evening. Next afternoon I ran one on my PCmill50 and he was floored when I brought one to him that evening. Look under Drinique drink wear, knucle opener.
  That's how I started machining, local machine shops weren't interested in doing batches of parts, their attitudes left a  lot to be desired. I had one part that was for 100 pcs @ $35.00 each. I figured that I could just buy a Lathe & mill for that and these EMCO CNC machines were perfect. One of the Machine shops told me to bring in the parts that I had made and when they saw it offered me a job on the spot.
On Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 09:56:38 AM EST, Tony Schalburg via Groups.Io <tonyschalburg@...> wrote:


Hi
Im the happy owner of 4 emco machines. 
One et120p, 
One compact 6
One vmc100 
Those 3 with original tm02 controller. 
The last one is a vmc100 im in proces of retrofitting. 
Its a huge proces to retrofit a mill, and expencive, cuz i want to keep the original berger lahr steppers and the Siemens dc motor. No compromices here. Want to run the vmc100 with Mach3, as close to the original setup as possible. 
The ATC, i had a plugin made, cost me 200$.
Stepper drivers, i use original from berger lahr, but updated, cost 600$ each. Siemens dc motor, im using a parker 506 dc driver, cost 400£.
Pwm,relay board and BOB, i got from cnc4pc, all for about 400$.
I have been working on the retrofit for more than a year now, but Will soon complete it. 
What i want to say, about retrofitting those Nice old machines, is, if you want to do it, do it prober, so you have a machine that can and Will work for many years to come. 
Yes you can do a cheap retrofit, but then you get a slow machine, that can do the job, but the emco machines Are Nice High pression machines, that deserves a prober setup. 
Tony