Date   

Re: Stepoer motor replacement recomidatiobs

Tarn Mott
 

Thanks very much for that David ill start researching your recomadations now .
Regards Tarn 

On Fri, 28 Aug 2020, 7:32 pm David Rabenius, <taborboy78@...> wrote:
   I would  have to say that you need to have a budget planned and what you want the retrofit to do. You could be well under $1,000. depending on which components you choose. You would have a MUCH more useful machine afterwards. If you want to have or add a fourth axis then the Gecko 540 would be a good start. It will give you the extra 4 axis capability and is a good solid drive. For stepper motors you don't need more than 200oz. in. You can choose steppers with encoder feedback or not, depends on your budget. Your choice of a controller board could be a Centroid Acorn or ?? If you have electronics experience then you should have no problems choosing the components. Do you want to have limit switches?, encoders on the steppers? E-stop??, digitizing capability?? these are some of the things you will need to decide on. I have a PC50 series mill that is factory stock, when it dies then I will do a retrofit. My retrofit will have 4th axis & digitizing capability.
   One has to remember that it is a small machine with limited H.P. & travel. So I wouldn't go overboard, some inexperienced people wish the machine to have more than it will deliver. Make no mistake I feel that this machine & the later ones are some of the best small machines made. I have made hundreds of parts on my mill and if you are careful they produce results approaching that of much larger machines. 


Re: Stepoer motor replacement recomidatiobs

David Rabenius
 

   I would  have to say that you need to have a budget planned and what you want the retrofit to do. You could be well under $1,000. depending on which components you choose. You would have a MUCH more useful machine afterwards. If you want to have or add a fourth axis then the Gecko 540 would be a good start. It will give you the extra 4 axis capability and is a good solid drive. For stepper motors you don't need more than 200oz. in. You can choose steppers with encoder feedback or not, depends on your budget. Your choice of a controller board could be a Centroid Acorn or ?? If you have electronics experience then you should have no problems choosing the components. Do you want to have limit switches?, encoders on the steppers? E-stop??, digitizing capability?? these are some of the things you will need to decide on. I have a PC50 series mill that is factory stock, when it dies then I will do a retrofit. My retrofit will have 4th axis & digitizing capability.
   One has to remember that it is a small machine with limited H.P. & travel. So I wouldn't go overboard, some inexperienced people wish the machine to have more than it will deliver. Make no mistake I feel that this machine & the later ones are some of the best small machines made. I have made hundreds of parts on my mill and if you are careful they produce results approaching that of much larger machines. 


Stepoer motor replacement recomidatiobs

Tarn Mott
 

Hi out there im new to the group and its my first time trying to rebuild a cnc.   any way I have a emco F1 that I want to upgrade , looking for any segestions for stepper motors and controllers or any recommendations would be appreciated . Cheers Tarn 


Re: SPINDLE SPEED CONTROL ORIGINAL C5

Dieter
 

Hi John,

A counter and a D/A converter could be a solution. (Henk's solution?)
Because the whole motor electronic has mains potential one must use an optocoupler or pulse transformer to send
the M26 pulses to the modified controller.

Dieter


Re: SPINDLE SPEED CONTROL ORIGINAL C5

johnb
 

Hi Dave,
My machine is a mk4 so the spindle speeds for threading are :- 0,5-1,0mm pitch = 500rpm 1,0-1,5mm = 320rpm all +5%.
I have used speeds up to these limits so it means I can use one belt range max up to 1500 rpm then down to threading speed,
John


Re: SPINDLE SPEED CONTROL ORIGINAL C5

David Rabenius
 

The threading on those machines requires you to run at 300ish rpm. Has to do with the ancient electronics. My pcturn50 is limited to like 26tpi. threads max. The 55 series has a 80 tpi. max.
I had a older cnc5, threading was hit or miss. When it was dialed in it worked great.The only better way is to retrofit to a new controller and run a newer P.C.

Dave


SPINDLE SPEED CONTROL ORIGINAL C5

johnb
 

Hello,
Has anyone got any ideas how to control /change the spindle speed on an original c5 cnc within the program using m26 pulse output.
I know Henk did this but no precise information is available on how he did it.
After making a few parts with threads and varying dias this would be be of great benefit.
I have looked at numerous digipots but they alone would not do the job.
Thanks
John


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

marty_in_mesa
 

I emailed you directly
There are two software packages for Acorn. Lathe and Mill. In lathe you can label any axis "C" and make it a rotary axis and operate it as such.
You are referring to two different control platforms. Acorn, step and direction, All in One DC and Oak, are closed loop servo control systems used on more complex turning/machining centers.

Marty

On Tue, Aug 18, 2020 at 4:54 PM rcflyer <sclcl082@...> wrote:
You clearly don't understand. Mill 4th axis isn't Lathe C axis. C axis isn't an option in Acorn.

Wow, you have some pull at Centroid. Tell them there is no C axias video and they post one for you.

Now, tell them to finish the manual with C Axis. Heh, C axis software option is 2kUSD for Allin1DC or Oak. That's 4kUSD for the board and software, then add computer, servos, drives.....



On Tue, Aug 18, 2020 at 3:28 PM marty_in_mesa <marty.escarcega@...> wrote:
Centroid fully supports 4th axis simultaneous movement. In All in One and Oak.
 
Centroid Acorn has 4 axis and you can make anyone of them a rotary axis.
At the end of the day it is up to the integrator to make them function as desired.
Seems you may have a Fanuc specific compatibility question, one which I am not qualified to answer.
BUT please by all means post your question here. Centroid staff and very knowledgeable users can answer it better than I:

Marty 

On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 1:58 PM rcflyer <sclcl082@...> wrote:
Allin1DC and Oak by Centroid claim to support lathe C axis. Centroid's Lathe control manuals make no mention of C axis except for M codes to enable and disable C axis. It could have been a great solution even if I had to dump the steppers for servos. Without polar and cylindrical interpolation ( Fanuc G12.1 and G7.1) it was a no go unless I also buy CAM to program point to point C axis. If I program point to point and give up tool radius for milling in C, LinuxCNC does it for free.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

rcflyer
 

You clearly don't understand. Mill 4th axis isn't Lathe C axis. C axis isn't an option in Acorn.

Wow, you have some pull at Centroid. Tell them there is no C axias video and they post one for you.

Now, tell them to finish the manual with C Axis. Heh, C axis software option is 2kUSD for Allin1DC or Oak. That's 4kUSD for the board and software, then add computer, servos, drives.....



On Tue, Aug 18, 2020 at 3:28 PM marty_in_mesa <marty.escarcega@...> wrote:
Centroid fully supports 4th axis simultaneous movement. In All in One and Oak.
 
Centroid Acorn has 4 axis and you can make anyone of them a rotary axis.
At the end of the day it is up to the integrator to make them function as desired.
Seems you may have a Fanuc specific compatibility question, one which I am not qualified to answer.
BUT please by all means post your question here. Centroid staff and very knowledgeable users can answer it better than I:

Marty 

On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 1:58 PM rcflyer <sclcl082@...> wrote:
Allin1DC and Oak by Centroid claim to support lathe C axis. Centroid's Lathe control manuals make no mention of C axis except for M codes to enable and disable C axis. It could have been a great solution even if I had to dump the steppers for servos. Without polar and cylindrical interpolation ( Fanuc G12.1 and G7.1) it was a no go unless I also buy CAM to program point to point C axis. If I program point to point and give up tool radius for milling in C, LinuxCNC does it for free.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

marty_in_mesa
 

Centroid fully supports 4th axis simultaneous movement. In All in One and Oak.
 
Centroid Acorn has 4 axis and you can make anyone of them a rotary axis.
At the end of the day it is up to the integrator to make them function as desired.
Seems you may have a Fanuc specific compatibility question, one which I am not qualified to answer.
BUT please by all means post your question here. Centroid staff and very knowledgeable users can answer it better than I:

Marty 


On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 1:58 PM rcflyer <sclcl082@...> wrote:
Allin1DC and Oak by Centroid claim to support lathe C axis. Centroid's Lathe control manuals make no mention of C axis except for M codes to enable and disable C axis. It could have been a great solution even if I had to dump the steppers for servos. Without polar and cylindrical interpolation ( Fanuc G12.1 and G7.1) it was a no go unless I also buy CAM to program point to point C axis. If I program point to point and give up tool radius for milling in C, LinuxCNC does it for free.

I wasn't able to find a Centroid C axis video. If you have a link I'd be interested in seeing it.

On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 11:52 AM marty_in_mesa <marty.escarcega@...> wrote:
Centroid Acorn does 4 axis and an axis can be assigned a C axis. 
Steo and direction motion controller AND software from Centroid. They specialize in CNC machine motion control.


Search YouTube

Many choices out there for the DIYer with basic electrical/electronics skills. Linux CNC, Mach, Masso etc. 

I've done about a half dozen PC5 conversions, added a true spindle encoder for threading and CSS. You need the pro license for that, but you can buy it at anytime.

It is nice to use a modern control.
Marty


On Sat, Aug 15, 2020, 8:56 AM rcflyer <sclcl082@...> wrote:
You absolutely need to run Emco Winnc to communicate to the ACC. Contact Emco Service with your serial number to see if they can help you get what you need. ACC runs blind, it only interprets the commands sent to it by the PC which runs the Winnc GUI. ACC does run linux, but that's irrelevant.

5000USD for a control upgrade which is plug and play with zero setup involved is great for a school who intends to teach Fanuc or other industrial control. If you have time to burn or has little value, retrofits are acceptable. If you want to be making parts ASAP, ACC is a good choice for these machines. I thought the AC95 in my lathe was failing when I got it and it looked like ACC was the only option. I investigated retrofits having worked with Linux CNC before. However, nothing had a reasonable programming solution for C axis. For a simple lathe or mill, I would definitely do a retrofit over ACC, but Fanuc or Siemens interfaces are nice if you're used to them. I bought a mill with ACC that wasn't running, thinking I would have to retrofit LinuxCNC. I was very glad to bring the original back to life. LinuxCNC would have allowed some upgrades, but for now it will be fine.

On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 9:23 AM David Rabenius via groups.io <swedeson2002=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Possible that you could use another software package. You may need to change out the mini computer in the ACC to another one and run Mach or Linux. I believe the factory ACC is Linux based but cannot guarantee. I always wondered if one could somehow configure a raspberry Pi and use that internally, been told it could work but would take experiences that I do not have.
  The software you need is probably WinNc  & controller of your choice. Fanuc, Seimens, EMCOtronic, Heidenhain,etc. This would be connected to an external PC via ethernet cable. Frankly dont understand why someone would pay the $4,000.00 price tag to up grade when you could use more off the shelf stuff for way less than half.

Dave

On Saturday, August 15, 2020, 10:07:44 AM EDT, Joe Y <kasanay@...> wrote:


So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

arjan.dijk
 

You can use the same licenses, but you can now use the version that supports winxp. License is a key number and name, no matter what system, no matter what machine

Op za 15 aug. 2020 16:07 schreef Joe Y <kasanay@...>:

So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Compact 5 PC upgrade

Sharp.Shooter
 

Hi
my 5PC is heavily modded already, and running under LinuxCNC. I have purchased original 6 position turret and it should be here any day now. Also, I purchased new closed loop nema 23 steppers and drivers, to replace the ones I installed a few years ago.
Few questions - after I replace the steppers and drivers (I am using cheap PRC 5 axis bob) do I have to make some alterations to hal and ini files, if I connect the new hardware to the same spots as the old ones?
And for turret, do I have to add something in order to get it working with LinuxCNC?
I will attach my configuration files in next few days, along with some pics of the machine :)
Thanks
Stefan


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

rcflyer
 

Allin1DC and Oak by Centroid claim to support lathe C axis. Centroid's Lathe control manuals make no mention of C axis except for M codes to enable and disable C axis. It could have been a great solution even if I had to dump the steppers for servos. Without polar and cylindrical interpolation ( Fanuc G12.1 and G7.1) it was a no go unless I also buy CAM to program point to point C axis. If I program point to point and give up tool radius for milling in C, LinuxCNC does it for free.

I wasn't able to find a Centroid C axis video. If you have a link I'd be interested in seeing it.


On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 11:52 AM marty_in_mesa <marty.escarcega@...> wrote:
Centroid Acorn does 4 axis and an axis can be assigned a C axis. 
Steo and direction motion controller AND software from Centroid. They specialize in CNC machine motion control.


Search YouTube

Many choices out there for the DIYer with basic electrical/electronics skills. Linux CNC, Mach, Masso etc. 

I've done about a half dozen PC5 conversions, added a true spindle encoder for threading and CSS. You need the pro license for that, but you can buy it at anytime.

It is nice to use a modern control.
Marty


On Sat, Aug 15, 2020, 8:56 AM rcflyer <sclcl082@...> wrote:
You absolutely need to run Emco Winnc to communicate to the ACC. Contact Emco Service with your serial number to see if they can help you get what you need. ACC runs blind, it only interprets the commands sent to it by the PC which runs the Winnc GUI. ACC does run linux, but that's irrelevant.

5000USD for a control upgrade which is plug and play with zero setup involved is great for a school who intends to teach Fanuc or other industrial control. If you have time to burn or has little value, retrofits are acceptable. If you want to be making parts ASAP, ACC is a good choice for these machines. I thought the AC95 in my lathe was failing when I got it and it looked like ACC was the only option. I investigated retrofits having worked with Linux CNC before. However, nothing had a reasonable programming solution for C axis. For a simple lathe or mill, I would definitely do a retrofit over ACC, but Fanuc or Siemens interfaces are nice if you're used to them. I bought a mill with ACC that wasn't running, thinking I would have to retrofit LinuxCNC. I was very glad to bring the original back to life. LinuxCNC would have allowed some upgrades, but for now it will be fine.

On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 9:23 AM David Rabenius via groups.io <swedeson2002=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Possible that you could use another software package. You may need to change out the mini computer in the ACC to another one and run Mach or Linux. I believe the factory ACC is Linux based but cannot guarantee. I always wondered if one could somehow configure a raspberry Pi and use that internally, been told it could work but would take experiences that I do not have.
  The software you need is probably WinNc  & controller of your choice. Fanuc, Seimens, EMCOtronic, Heidenhain,etc. This would be connected to an external PC via ethernet cable. Frankly dont understand why someone would pay the $4,000.00 price tag to up grade when you could use more off the shelf stuff for way less than half.

Dave

On Saturday, August 15, 2020, 10:07:44 AM EDT, Joe Y <kasanay@...> wrote:


So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

User0n3
 

I believe there is no work around widely available to run the emco machine without its component software. Even if the ACC installed it still communicates to pc and software and requires emco software and licenses. I'm new to this machine so its only my conclusion thus far given what I have read.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

marty_in_mesa
 

Centroid Acorn does 4 axis and an axis can be assigned a C axis. 
Steo and direction motion controller AND software from Centroid. They specialize in CNC machine motion control.


Search YouTube

Many choices out there for the DIYer with basic electrical/electronics skills. Linux CNC, Mach, Masso etc. 

I've done about a half dozen PC5 conversions, added a true spindle encoder for threading and CSS. You need the pro license for that, but you can buy it at anytime.

It is nice to use a modern control.
Marty


On Sat, Aug 15, 2020, 8:56 AM rcflyer <sclcl082@...> wrote:
You absolutely need to run Emco Winnc to communicate to the ACC. Contact Emco Service with your serial number to see if they can help you get what you need. ACC runs blind, it only interprets the commands sent to it by the PC which runs the Winnc GUI. ACC does run linux, but that's irrelevant.

5000USD for a control upgrade which is plug and play with zero setup involved is great for a school who intends to teach Fanuc or other industrial control. If you have time to burn or has little value, retrofits are acceptable. If you want to be making parts ASAP, ACC is a good choice for these machines. I thought the AC95 in my lathe was failing when I got it and it looked like ACC was the only option. I investigated retrofits having worked with Linux CNC before. However, nothing had a reasonable programming solution for C axis. For a simple lathe or mill, I would definitely do a retrofit over ACC, but Fanuc or Siemens interfaces are nice if you're used to them. I bought a mill with ACC that wasn't running, thinking I would have to retrofit LinuxCNC. I was very glad to bring the original back to life. LinuxCNC would have allowed some upgrades, but for now it will be fine.

On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 9:23 AM David Rabenius via groups.io <swedeson2002=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Possible that you could use another software package. You may need to change out the mini computer in the ACC to another one and run Mach or Linux. I believe the factory ACC is Linux based but cannot guarantee. I always wondered if one could somehow configure a raspberry Pi and use that internally, been told it could work but would take experiences that I do not have.
  The software you need is probably WinNc  & controller of your choice. Fanuc, Seimens, EMCOtronic, Heidenhain,etc. This would be connected to an external PC via ethernet cable. Frankly dont understand why someone would pay the $4,000.00 price tag to up grade when you could use more off the shelf stuff for way less than half.

Dave

On Saturday, August 15, 2020, 10:07:44 AM EDT, Joe Y <kasanay@...> wrote:


So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

rcflyer
 

You absolutely need to run Emco Winnc to communicate to the ACC. Contact Emco Service with your serial number to see if they can help you get what you need. ACC runs blind, it only interprets the commands sent to it by the PC which runs the Winnc GUI. ACC does run linux, but that's irrelevant.

5000USD for a control upgrade which is plug and play with zero setup involved is great for a school who intends to teach Fanuc or other industrial control. If you have time to burn or has little value, retrofits are acceptable. If you want to be making parts ASAP, ACC is a good choice for these machines. I thought the AC95 in my lathe was failing when I got it and it looked like ACC was the only option. I investigated retrofits having worked with Linux CNC before. However, nothing had a reasonable programming solution for C axis. For a simple lathe or mill, I would definitely do a retrofit over ACC, but Fanuc or Siemens interfaces are nice if you're used to them. I bought a mill with ACC that wasn't running, thinking I would have to retrofit LinuxCNC. I was very glad to bring the original back to life. LinuxCNC would have allowed some upgrades, but for now it will be fine.


On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 9:23 AM David Rabenius via groups.io <swedeson2002=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Possible that you could use another software package. You may need to change out the mini computer in the ACC to another one and run Mach or Linux. I believe the factory ACC is Linux based but cannot guarantee. I always wondered if one could somehow configure a raspberry Pi and use that internally, been told it could work but would take experiences that I do not have.
  The software you need is probably WinNc  & controller of your choice. Fanuc, Seimens, EMCOtronic, Heidenhain,etc. This would be connected to an external PC via ethernet cable. Frankly dont understand why someone would pay the $4,000.00 price tag to up grade when you could use more off the shelf stuff for way less than half.

Dave

On Saturday, August 15, 2020, 10:07:44 AM EDT, Joe Y <kasanay@...> wrote:


So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

Joe Y
 

The OS installed on the ACC mini computer is definitely a version of Linux.

Joe Yanasak

On Aug 15, 2020, at 9:23 AM, David Rabenius via groups.io <swedeson2002@...> wrote:


Possible that you could use another software package. You may need to change out the mini computer in the ACC to another one and run Mach or Linux. I believe the factory ACC is Linux based but cannot guarantee. I always wondered if one could somehow configure a raspberry Pi and use that internally, been told it could work but would take experiences that I do not have.
  The software you need is probably WinNc  & controller of your choice. Fanuc, Seimens, EMCOtronic, Heidenhain,etc. This would be connected to an external PC via ethernet cable. Frankly dont understand why someone would pay the $4,000.00 price tag to up grade when you could use more off the shelf stuff for way less than half.

Dave

On Saturday, August 15, 2020, 10:07:44 AM EDT, Joe Y <kasanay@...> wrote:


So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

David Rabenius
 

Possible that you could use another software package. You may need to change out the mini computer in the ACC to another one and run Mach or Linux. I believe the factory ACC is Linux based but cannot guarantee. I always wondered if one could somehow configure a raspberry Pi and use that internally, been told it could work but would take experiences that I do not have.
  The software you need is probably WinNc  & controller of your choice. Fanuc, Seimens, EMCOtronic, Heidenhain,etc. This would be connected to an external PC via ethernet cable. Frankly dont understand why someone would pay the $4,000.00 price tag to up grade when you could use more off the shelf stuff for way less than half.

Dave

On Saturday, August 15, 2020, 10:07:44 AM EDT, Joe Y <kasanay@...> wrote:


So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

Joe Y
 

So with the ACC retrofit installed, will I need proprietary software and license?
I don’t have these. Is there any work-around?

Kasanay

On Aug 14, 2020, at 5:55 PM, arjan.dijk <arjan.dijk@...> wrote:


Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:
I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.


Re: Emco PC Mill 55

arjan.dijk
 

Nothing will change regarding speeds. You can just ditch the Windows 98 pc and work with something newer

Op vr 14 aug. 2020 13:17 schreef User0n3 <chico_181@...>:

I also have the same machine however I do not have the ACC. As far as I have found it requires the WinNC software, MSD disk, and appropriate licenses to function. I have yet to successfully run mine. I'm unsure what changes with the ACC. From what I have read on the machine it is capable of accuracy and finishes of high quality machines only slower since the machine is not built for production. Becoming familiar and tinkering with feeds and speeds will be your go to for achieving best results.

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