Topics

PSK63 Experiment


Bruce Prior
 

Elecraft fans ---

This evening at 2000 PDT (0300 Z) I will send an experimental transmission on 7071 kHz using PSK63 with a 25 W output. It will be the latest bulletin from the RF Seismograph project. Alex VE7DXW will be speaking at the TAPR/DCC conference on September 11. I would appreciate some feedback about reception. Please give your call sign and QTH to <n7rr@...>.

Here is information about the virtual TAPR/DCC conference:

The 39th Annual ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference (DCC) will be a virtual conference on September 11 and 12, using Zoom video communications and YouTube video-sharing platforms.

Registered DCC attendees participating via Zoom will be able to interact with presenters and other attendees via a chat room as well as raise a virtual hand to ask questions. Click here to register (you don’t need a Zoom account to register).

Non-registered DCC attendees can watch the live stream for free on YouTube, however, non-registered DCC attendees will not be able to ask questions or chat. No registration is required for YouTube access (the YouTube URL will be announced and posted on this webpage preceding the DCC).

DCC registration is free for TAPR members and $30 for non-members. Members receive a 100% discount at checkout. Click here to register.

Non-members who would like to join TAPR and receive the free DCC pass can simply add TAPR membership and DCC registration to their shopping carts. After checkout, they will receive the free DCC pass when their membership is processed.

_______________________________________________ aprssig mailing list aprssig@... http://lists.tapr.org/mailman/listinfo/aprssig_lists.tapr.org

73,
Bruce Prior N7RR


Ray Maxfield
 

Bruce….

A little more information would be helpful…..

Your QTH ?

What type of antenna ? 

 

Ray WA6VAB K3

 

 

 

From: Bruce Prior
Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2020 9:09 AM
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: [Elecraft-K3] PSK63 Experiment

 

Elecraft fans ---

This evening at 2000 PDT (0300 Z) I will send an experimental transmission on 7071 kHz using PSK63 with a 25 W output. It will be the latest bulletin from the RF Seismograph project. Alex VE7DXW will be speaking at the TAPR/DCC conference on September 11. I would appreciate some feedback about reception. Please give your call sign and QTH to <n7rr@...>.

Here is information about the virtual TAPR/DCC conference:

The 39th Annual ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference (DCC) will be a virtual conference on September 11 and 12, using Zoom video communications and YouTube video-sharing platforms.

Registered DCC attendees participating via Zoom will be able to interact with presenters and other attendees via a chat room as well as raise a virtual hand to ask questions. Click here to register (you don’t need a Zoom account to register).

Non-registered DCC attendees can watch the live stream for free on YouTube, however, non-registered DCC attendees will not be able to ask questions or chat. No registration is required for YouTube access (the YouTube URL will be announced and posted on this webpage preceding the DCC).

DCC registration is free for TAPR members and $30 for non-members. Members receive a 100% discount at checkout. Click here to register.

Non-members who would like to join TAPR and receive the free DCC pass can simply add TAPR membership and DCC registration to their shopping carts. After checkout, they will receive the free DCC pass when their membership is processed.

_______________________________________________ aprssig mailing list aprssig@... http://lists.tapr.org/mailman/listinfo/aprssig_lists.tapr.org

73,
Bruce Prior N7RR

 


Bruce Prior
 

Apparently nobody tuned into the experimental PSK63 transmission last evening, which is disappointing. I was operating from Blaine WA using my K3 and a wire antenna with 25 W output.

PSK63 has potential for pushing a lot of data during emergency situations without complex intervening infrastructure which is typically used for VHF and UHF digital communications. Although you can't see it on the display of your Elecraft K3, K3s, KX3 or KX2, PSK31 and PSK63 also allow the use of UPPER CASE and lower case text, which can be most helpful for conveying the kind of detailed technical information which could enhance emergency communications.

A full computer could be used with PSK31 and PSK63, but it is not necessary. You can use a small wireless keyboard plus a SideKar Extreme unit made by QRPworks https://www.qrpworks.com/sidekar-extreme.html to see up to 80 characters of UPPER CASE and lower case text at a time. HF keyboard-to-keyboard communication is possible between the field and an emergency operations center using, say, a tiny KX2 with a simple wire antenna plus a SideKar Extreme unit with either PSK31 or PSK63 mode. Baudot RTTY and CW are also possible, but those modes are less robust and more inefficient than PSK31 and PSK63; both CW and Baudot RTTY do not differentiate between UPPER CASE and lower case characters.

73,
Bruce Prior N7RR
• Use wireless or wired USB keyboard or paddle to transmit • Store messages and macros in 20 slots (80 characters each) • Change Frequency & Mode instantly using the keyboard • Use "Grab & Go" feature to capture call for outgoing messages & the log • Contest features. Field Day Dupe checking included. • View the display in any conditions with the sunlight readable screen
www.qrpworks.com


Lyn Norstad
 

Bruce –

 

I can’t speak for anyone else, but for me the notice was too short.  Sorry.  I was in fact in QSO with a WA station on 40m at that time.

 

Will you be conducting another test?

 

Thanks.

 

73

Lyn, W0LEN

 

From: Elecraft-K3@groups.io [mailto:Elecraft-K3@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Prior
Sent: Wednesday, September 02, 2020 11:48 AM
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] PSK63 Experiment

 

Apparently nobody tuned into the experimental PSK63 transmission last evening, which is disappointing. I was operating from Blaine WA using my K3 and a wire antenna with 25 W output.

 

PSK63 has potential for pushing a lot of data during emergency situations without complex intervening infrastructure which is typically used for VHF and UHF digital communications. Although you can't see it on the display of your Elecraft K3, K3s, KX3 or KX2, PSK31 and PSK63 also allow the use of UPPER CASE and lower case text, which can be most helpful for conveying the kind of detailed technical information which could enhance emergency communications.

 

A full computer could be used with PSK31 and PSK63, but it is not necessary. You can use a small wireless keyboard plus a SideKar Extreme unit made by QRPworks https://www.qrpworks.com/sidekar-extreme.html to see up to 80 characters of UPPER CASE and lower case text at a time. HF keyboard-to-keyboard communication is possible between the field and an emergency operations center using, say, a tiny KX2 with a simple wire antenna plus a SideKar Extreme unit with either PSK31 or PSK63 mode. Baudot RTTY and CW are also possible, but those modes are less robust and more inefficient than PSK31 and PSK63; both CW and Baudot RTTY do not differentiate between UPPER CASE and lower case characters.

 

73,

Bruce Prior N7RR

• Use wireless or wired USB keyboard or paddle to transmit • Store messages and macros in 20 slots (80 characters each) • Change Frequency & Mode instantly using the keyboard • Use "Grab & Go" feature to capture call for outgoing messages & the log • Contest features. Field Day Dupe checking included. • View the display in any conditions with the sunlight readable screen

www.qrpworks.com

 


Tim Cotton
 

I think you'll find MFSK and Olivia to be far more reliable and robust modes under adverse conditions tin emergency situations than PSK.

On Wed, Sep 2, 2020 at 1:24 PM Lyn Norstad <Lyn@...> wrote:

Bruce –

 

I can’t speak for anyone else, but for me the notice was too short.  Sorry.  I was in fact in QSO with a WA station on 40m at that time.

 

Will you be conducting another test?

 

Thanks.

 

73

Lyn, W0LEN

 

From: Elecraft-K3@groups.io [mailto:Elecraft-K3@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Prior
Sent: Wednesday, September 02, 2020 11:48 AM
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] PSK63 Experiment

 

Apparently nobody tuned into the experimental PSK63 transmission last evening, which is disappointing. I was operating from Blaine WA using my K3 and a wire antenna with 25 W output.

 

PSK63 has potential for pushing a lot of data during emergency situations without complex intervening infrastructure which is typically used for VHF and UHF digital communications. Although you can't see it on the display of your Elecraft K3, K3s, KX3 or KX2, PSK31 and PSK63 also allow the use of UPPER CASE and lower case text, which can be most helpful for conveying the kind of detailed technical information which could enhance emergency communications.

 

A full computer could be used with PSK31 and PSK63, but it is not necessary. You can use a small wireless keyboard plus a SideKar Extreme unit made by QRPworks https://www.qrpworks.com/sidekar-extreme.html to see up to 80 characters of UPPER CASE and lower case text at a time. HF keyboard-to-keyboard communication is possible between the field and an emergency operations center using, say, a tiny KX2 with a simple wire antenna plus a SideKar Extreme unit with either PSK31 or PSK63 mode. Baudot RTTY and CW are also possible, but those modes are less robust and more inefficient than PSK31 and PSK63; both CW and Baudot RTTY do not differentiate between UPPER CASE and lower case characters.

 

73,

Bruce Prior N7RR

• Use wireless or wired USB keyboard or paddle to transmit • Store messages and macros in 20 slots (80 characters each) • Change Frequency & Mode instantly using the keyboard • Use "Grab & Go" feature to capture call for outgoing messages & the log • Contest features. Field Day Dupe checking included. • View the display in any conditions with the sunlight readable screen

 


Bruce Prior
 

Thanks for your input, Tim. Of course, accuracy and reliability point toward error-correcting modes, always with a speed penalty. This is an experiment to see if PSK63 is robust enough to get larger quantities of information transmitted on a narrow channel reliably under nominal operating conditions. We know that PSK31 is more robust than CW when the latter is sent at usual speeds. I noticed that in sending a moderately-lengthy text via PSK63, there were short but frequent pauses which didn't change the message content, including punctuation, capitalization, spacing, etc. I don't know what function those pauses serve. We'll learn more when we spend more time actually operating on the air. That's what experimenting is all about. Since Elecraft has a Morse-to-PSK63 interface, we can begin experimenting without adding more infrastructure. Of course it's easier to handle larger chunks of text if we use an Elecraft Utility or one of the QRPworks products.
73,
Bruce Prior N7RR


Tim Cotton
 

Bruce:

Thanks for the reply.  Years ago I did a little work testing various modes when FLDIGI was getting started.  I was always impressed with MFSK as being quite robust - even though somewhat difficult to tune.   It's speed could be varied from MFSK 4 up to MFSK 128 or perhaps even MFSK 256 (which was flying) - depending upon conditions.  Of course it depended on the operators on each end reaching an agreement on  adjusting the speed for maximum throughput.   I often wondered why an ARQ program couldn't be modified rather simply to do this automatically by keeping track of block sizes and repeat requests.  Under good conditions when few repeats are needed the block size could automatically be increased.  When repeat requests increase, the block sizes could be reduced accordingly.   The algorithm would be pretty simple. I never could get W1HKJ to get interested in the idea though, so nothing came of it.   I  must admit that I know very little about information theory so my idea was probably a  reinvention  of the wheel.  Perhaps PSK63 could be used in ARQ mode.   I wonder if the pauses you observed in PSK63 might be due to some sort of buffering phenomenon.   I lost interest in  PSK31 as a conversational mode years ago when macros began to be the primary mode of operation.   My theory for this was that most humans can't type fast enough to keep the buffer full in PSK31 and hated to see their transmissions at "idle" - hence the need to send a bunch of canned information to keep the buffer from running dry.   The few operators that actually typed their text produced numerous "pauses" just as you mentioned.  Good luck with your experiments.

73, Tim - N4UM


On Sat, Sep 5, 2020 at 9:10 PM Bruce Prior <n7rr@...> wrote:
Thanks for your input, Tim. Of course, accuracy and reliability point toward error-correcting modes, always with a speed penalty. This is an experiment to see if PSK63 is robust enough to get larger quantities of information transmitted on a narrow channel reliably under nominal operating conditions. We know that PSK31 is more robust than CW when the latter is sent at usual speeds. I noticed that in sending a moderately-lengthy text via PSK63, there were short but frequent pauses which didn't change the message content, including punctuation, capitalization, spacing, etc. I don't know what function those pauses serve. We'll learn more when we spend more time actually operating on the air. That's what experimenting is all about. Since Elecraft has a Morse-to-PSK63 interface, we can begin experimenting without adding more infrastructure. Of course it's easier to handle larger chunks of text if we use an Elecraft Utility or one of the QRPworks products.
73,
Bruce Prior N7RR