Topics

Factory service still available?

Charlie T, k3ICH
 

Is that an official µSoft product, or after-market?

Sounds like a great program for us old W-7 users.

 

I have been holding off changing over to W-Ø, mainly because of all the grief everyone seem to have with it.

I know it’s inevitable, but so far, have been ignoring the little pop-up that reminds me every couple, days.

I have a good anti-virus, phishing etc. program running and have never had a problem.

That, plus the computer is put-to-sleep whenever I’m not actually using it.

 

Thanks for the little OT diversion, Charlie k3ICH

 

 

 

 

From: Elecraft-K3@groups.io <Elecraft-K3@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Canfield
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2020 8:50 AM
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?

 

You can make Win10 more user friendly by installing Classic Shell (free) which replaces the standard menu, which I intensely hate. Classic Shell brings the familiar W7 menu back.

_._,_._,_

 

John Canfield
 

No, it's not uSoft. I just looked at the website for Classic Shell and the original developer quit the project 12/2017. It's now called Open Shell and it's on GitHub. Classic Shell works fine though, I have it installed on five or six PCs.
-- end of off-topic--

Bob McGraw - K4TAX
 

In reading the various sites, reflectors, and discussion groups, I am constantly amazed at the issues hams seemingly are having with their equipment.   I sit here every day in front of my K3S, P3, KPA500, and KAT500 along with various software applications. These applications run on a laptop that was originally released with Windows Vista.   Today it is running Windows 10 Pro.   I have no issues or problems running Windows 10 Pro.    My antennas are basic wire antennas, center fed, with either coax and a 1:1 current balun at the feed point, or center fed with 450 ohm window line that runs from the feed point to the operating position. There is nothing challenging or difficult or complex about my station.  It is items which I purchased assembled from Elecraft or in the case of antennas, those I assembled and erected myself.

My point, my system works as designed, and as expected, and does everything I want it to do, and that's 100% of the time.  Why then do others have the issues?  It isn't the equipment.   Perhaps they need to look in the mirror to observe the real source of the problem.  Windows 10 Pro is a different animal, it is more challenging, it requires a deeper understand.   The issues are not Windows 10 Pro related.    In general today I find that hams, many have obtained their license from the Extra Class prize out of a box of Cracker Jacks are the ones having the problems.  I know this statement will step on toes and offend some people.   However I find, in general, there is lack of knowledge and understanding.

As a member of a local radio club, I was asked to assist with teaching new prospective hams in preparation for their license exam.  I inquired as to what I would be teaching?   The answer came back  "the test"!    HUH!!   Why not just sign the papers and give them an Extra Class license.   Needless to say I declined the offer to teach.

For me, I started as a Novice Class operator, not an Extra Class as many have done today.  I kept and operated my Novice station for almost a year before becoming a General Class operator. Finally moving up to Advanced and then Extra Class license. Personally today, I think the VEC program is a horrible failure and done a grave injustice to the ham radio society.

I'm glad I'm 77 years young, I have had my ham license since 1959 thus 61 years.  I'm also glad, the way things are going, I won't be around many more years to endure the mess.  This is just one step in the dumbing down of society in general.

From experience, the Elecraft Factory service is among the best in the world.  They, like others, are taking precautions necessary to protect the staff.  Smart decision.

73

Bob, K4TAX

Michael Kopec
 

Well said, on all, Bob. And Yes, Elecraft provides the best factory service I have experienced in Ham Radio or any other unrelated product that I have purchased. They are one of the few. if not the only, manufacture that helps and encourages you to repair or build their equipment. Hey, stick around a bunch more years, sit back, chuckle, even laugh at times at this current state of Ham Radio. 73 de Mike K8NS.

On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 12:42:40 PM EDT, Bob McGraw - K4TAX <rmcgraw@...> wrote:


In reading the various sites, reflectors, and discussion groups, I am
constantly amazed at the issues hams seemingly are having with their
equipment.   I sit here every day in front of my K3S, P3, KPA500, and
KAT500 along with various software applications. These applications run
on a laptop that was originally released with Windows Vista.   Today it
is running Windows 10 Pro.   I have no issues or problems running
Windows 10 Pro.    My antennas are basic wire antennas, center fed, with
either coax and a 1:1 current balun at the feed point, or center fed
with 450 ohm window line that runs from the feed point to the operating
position. There is nothing challenging or difficult or complex about my
station.  It is items which I purchased assembled from Elecraft or in
the case of antennas, those I assembled and erected myself.

My point, my system works as designed, and as expected, and does
everything I want it to do, and that's 100% of the time.  Why then do
others have the issues?  It isn't the equipment.   Perhaps they need to
look in the mirror to observe the real source of the problem.  Windows
10 Pro is a different animal, it is more challenging, it requires a
deeper understand.   The issues are not Windows 10 Pro related.    In
general today I find that hams, many have obtained their license from
the Extra Class prize out of a box of Cracker Jacks are the ones having
the problems.  I know this statement will step on toes and offend some
people.   However I find, in general, there is lack of knowledge and
understanding.

As a member of a local radio club, I was asked to assist with teaching
new prospective hams in preparation for their license exam.  I inquired
as to what I would be teaching?   The answer came back  "the test"!   
HUH!!   Why not just sign the papers and give them an Extra Class
license.   Needless to say I declined the offer to teach.

For me, I started as a Novice Class operator, not an Extra Class as many
have done today.  I kept and operated my Novice station for almost a
year before becoming a General Class operator. Finally moving up to
Advanced and then Extra Class license. Personally today, I think the VEC
program is a horrible failure and done a grave injustice to the ham
radio society.

I'm glad I'm 77 years young, I have had my ham license since 1959 thus
61 years.  I'm also glad, the way things are going, I won't be around
many more years to endure the mess.  This is just one step in the
dumbing down of society in general.

From experience, the Elecraft Factory service is among the best in the
world.  They, like others, are taking precautions necessary to protect
the staff.  Smart decision.

73

Bob, K4TAX




Rick NK7I
 

Bob,

You must remember that lists like this rarely sing the praises of any piece of soft/hardware.  The emails on such lists are HEAVILY biased towards problems, complaints and whining.

My Elecraft gear is on 24/7/265 (walk in and work, or to remote into) and has been near flawless, so not much reason to speak up (unless answering someone).  The software I use to manage it, similar.

My SteppIR DB36/80 works at about 90% (still random issues on 40M).  Together, I'm quite pleased with the station (still in progress).

Would that the sunspots take the hint, we'd all be too busy to complain.

73,
Rick NK7I

On 5/6/2020 9:38 AM, Bob McGraw - K4TAX wrote:
In reading the various sites, reflectors, and discussion groups, I am constantly amazed at the issues hams seemingly are having with their equipment.   I sit here every day in front of my K3S, P3, KPA500, and KAT500 along with various software applications. These applications run on a laptop that was originally released with Windows Vista.   Today it is running Windows 10 Pro.   I have no issues or problems running Windows 10 Pro.    My antennas are basic wire antennas, center fed, with either coax and a 1:1 current balun at the feed point, or center fed with 450 ohm window line that runs from the feed point to the operating position. There is nothing challenging or difficult or complex about my station.  It is items which I purchased assembled from Elecraft or in the case of antennas, those I assembled and erected myself.

My point, my system works as designed, and as expected, and does everything I want it to do, and that's 100% of the time.  Why then do others have the issues?  It isn't the equipment.   Perhaps they need to look in the mirror to observe the real source of the problem.  Windows 10 Pro is a different animal, it is more challenging, it requires a deeper understand.   The issues are not Windows 10 Pro related.    In general today I find that hams, many have obtained their license from the Extra Class prize out of a box of Cracker Jacks are the ones having the problems.  I know this statement will step on toes and offend some people.   However I find, in general, there is lack of knowledge and understanding.

As a member of a local radio club, I was asked to assist with teaching new prospective hams in preparation for their license exam.  I inquired as to what I would be teaching?   The answer came back  "the test"!    HUH!!   Why not just sign the papers and give them an Extra Class license.   Needless to say I declined the offer to teach.

For me, I started as a Novice Class operator, not an Extra Class as many have done today.  I kept and operated my Novice station for almost a year before becoming a General Class operator. Finally moving up to Advanced and then Extra Class license. Personally today, I think the VEC program is a horrible failure and done a grave injustice to the ham radio society.

I'm glad I'm 77 years young, I have had my ham license since 1959 thus 61 years.  I'm also glad, the way things are going, I won't be around many more years to endure the mess.  This is just one step in the dumbing down of society in general.

From experience, the Elecraft Factory service is among the best in the world.  They, like others, are taking precautions necessary to protect the staff.  Smart decision.

73

Bob, K4TAX


Peter
 

Bob,

Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.  However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.  These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.

Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.

73,
Peter Singer, W2PWS

Peter
 

Bob,
 
Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.  However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.  These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.
 
Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.
 
73,
Peter, W2PWS

KE1F Lou
 

USSR promoted ham radio as a sport because it was part of a semi military organization.

The most  active members of ham radio are the contesters. It should promoted as sport for people interested in digital, voice and traditional morse code communication.

CW part of most bands are the busiest during contest or DX Expeditions.

Just my 2cents 73 Lou KE1F 



Sent from my Galaxy Tab® A

-------- Original message --------
From: Peter <cb2ham@...>
Date: 5/6/20 1:42 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?

Bob,

Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.  However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.  These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.

Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.

73,
Peter Singer, W2PWS

Mel Marcus
 


Peter

Young people love to do things online. There are special promotions that hamtestonline offer tech candidates under 18.

I have used their programs from tech through extra.

It is a real learning experience.

A club can buy the certificates and provide them to the candidates.

Mel
NE9A

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?
From: "Peter" <cb2ham@...>
Date: Wed, May 06, 2020 12:42 pm
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io

Bob,

Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.  However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.  These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.

Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.

73,
Peter Singer, W2PWS

Bob Novas
 





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Peter <cb2ham@...>
Date: 5/6/20 19:57 (GMT-05:00)
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?

Bob,

Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.  However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.  These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.

Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.

73,
Peter Singer, W2PWS

Christopher Scibelli
 

When was the last time you tuned from 1.8 Mhz to the MUF?  Aside from Radio China, which is broadcasting like the Soviets and VOA did during the Cold War, the HF frequencies are mostly quiet.  There is plenty of unused spectrum without taking amateur radio frequencies. 

73,

Chris  NU1O


-----Original Message-----
From: Peter <cb2ham@...>
To: Elecraft-K3 <Elecraft-K3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 6, 2020 7:57 pm
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?

Bob,

Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.  However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.  These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.

Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.

73,
Peter Singer, W2PWS

John Canfield
 

Wow, my thread took a 90 degree turn LOL.

My K3S station (P3, KPA1500, SDA2000 Optimizer, Green Heron, LP500 station monitor, etc) are powered up 7x24. My K3 has had two confirmed problems in its lifetime - a blown 15V Zener on the power input (not my fault) and some blown surface mount parts on the USB/LAN  I/O board. The Ethernet part of the board was fine but something happened on the USB interface - still haven't figured out what would have caused that.

I'm still having an intermittent problem with the K3S hanging up in transmit mode. WSJT-X stopped the audio but the K3 doesn't drop back to RX. My PC and WSJT-X version have been stable since early December. I wonder if there's a way to monitor the CAT commands from the PC to the K3S?

Bob McGraw - K4TAX
 

When was the last time you checked to see if there is a coordinated VHF repeater frequency available for your area?   In our location, there are NO VHF coordination frequencies available.  But yet when carefully checking, there are only 10 to 15 repeaters actually on the air.   There are lots of "paper repeaters", those which have been coordinated and the owner has never put a repeater on the air, likely has no intention, but want to hold the pair just in case.    In case of what?   This takes and holds frequencies from others that might like to actually put a repeater on the air. 

Likewise, there are HF frequencies held by many organizations such as the military that are not being used.   Many are available and assigned for industrial applications.   And these HF allocations are on a world wide basis.   Frequencies which are allocated for SW broadcast that today have been greatly scaled back, otherwise not being used.  But yet, these are viewed by other world governments as not available to others.

Just remember, ownership is a sign of power. 

73

Bob, K4TAX


1d.  Re: Factory service still available?
From: Christopher Scibelli
Date: Wed, 06 May 2020 19:44:01 PDT

When was the last time you tuned from 1.8 Mhz to the MUF?  Aside from Radio China, which is broadcasting like the Soviets and VOA did during the Cold War, the HF frequencies are mostly quiet.  There is plenty of unused spectrum without taking amateur radio frequencies. 

73,

Chris  NU1O


Bob McGraw - K4TAX
 

John:
Sounds as though your station has suffered a nearby lightning strike.  A difference in potential between the computer USB port and the radio USB port can easily damage components.    Failure of components on the USB/LAN board is somewhat evidence of this event. 

As to the radio staying in transmit, I suspect you are using VOX and there is noise on the audio that keeps the VOX activated. Since the USB port is damaged, I suspect VOX is your only choice.  Reduce the VOX gain and set the VOX Hang to a value near zero.  Also, set the anti-VOX to a value near zero.   Add several snap-on ferrites to the line between the computer and radio.   I prefer the ones sized for RG-8 thus I can take the small cable through the snap-on for a couple of turns making it more effective. 

73
Bob, K4TAX

Ray Maxfield
 

Try transmitting in to  Dummy load and see if you have the same problem…..Wa6vab

 

From: John Canfield
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 5:50 AM
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?

 

Wow, my thread took a 90 degree turn LOL.

My K3S station (P3, KPA1500, SDA2000 Optimizer, Green Heron, LP500 station monitor, etc) are powered up 7x24. My K3 has had two confirmed problems in its lifetime - a blown 15V Zener on the power input (not my fault) and some blown surface mount parts on the USB/LAN  I/O board. The Ethernet part of the board was fine but something happened on the USB interface - still haven't figured out what would have caused that.

I'm still having an intermittent problem with the K3S hanging up in transmit mode. WSJT-X stopped the audio but the K3 doesn't drop back to RX. My PC and WSJT-X version have been stable since early December. I wonder if there's a way to monitor the CAT commands from the PC to the K3S?

 

Christopher Scibelli
 




-----Original Message-----
From: KE1F Lou <lmecseri@...>
To: Elecraft-K3 <Elecraft-K3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 6, 2020 8:31 pm
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?

USSR promoted ham radio as a sport because it was part of a semi military organization.

The most  active members of ham radio are the contesters. It should promoted as sport for people interested in digital, voice and traditional morse code communication.

CW part of most bands are the busiest during contest or DX Expeditions.

Just my 2cents 73 Lou KE1F 



Sent from my Galaxy Tab® A

-------- Original message --------
From: Peter <cb2ham@...>
Date: 5/6/20 1:42 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?

Bob,

Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.  However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.  These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.

Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.

73,
Peter Singer, W2PWS

Martin Kratoska
 

OMG...

73,
Martin, OK1RR


Dne 07. 05. 20 v 19:31 Christopher Scibelli via groups.io napsal(a):

-----Original Message-----
From: KE1F Lou <lmecseri@...>
To: Elecraft-K3 <Elecraft-K3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 6, 2020 8:31 pm
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?
USSR promoted ham radio as a sport because it was part of a semi military organization.
The most  active members of ham radio are the contesters. It should promoted as sport for people interested in digital, voice and traditional morse code communication.
CW part of most bands are the busiest during contest or DX Expeditions.
Just my 2cents 73 Lou KE1F
Sent from my Galaxy Tab® A
-------- Original message --------
From: Peter <cb2ham@...>
Date: 5/6/20 1:42 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Elecraft-K3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Elecraft-K3] Factory service still available?
Bob,
Concerning the present state of licensing, you are not incorrect.
However, one must consider several factors:
1.  Interest in amateur radio was severely impacted by the advent of the Internet and cellular phones.
2.  Young people now have many things to attract and distract them.
These include, hundreds of TV channels, endless sources of music, unreasonable levels of homework, extra-curricular school activities, etc.
3.  Volunteerism has seriously waned in this country.. E.g., in my home state, I was a volunteer firefighter for several years.  When I joined in the 1970s, there was actually a waiting list to join and now they cannot even field a volunteer force.
4.  Use it or lose it.
5.  Most who affiliate with radio clubs are gray heads like me.
Service clubs -- and all volunteer organizations -- are struggling these days.  Quite frankly, for the survival of ham radio and our access to the bands, the numbers have to be kept up and we have to prove the need for the service.  If that means reducing the standards, that's too bad, but a necessary evil.  So if we have to lower the bar for entry and advancement, let's just be appreciative that there are those showing interest in the hobby, so the rest of us can continue on.
73,
Peter Singer, W2PWS

John Canfield
 

It's very possible the USB failure on my K3 IO board was due to lightning, we do get some lightning here occasionally. All of the radio and PC equipment run off a large APC pure sine wave UPS - I was hoping that would isolate my stuff from the AC mains but maybe the UPS is normally in bypass mode until loss of input AC. I wonder if an isolation transformer would be of any benefit?

Bill Maddock
 

Most lightning damage I’ve seen comes from the antennas. A good ground and lightening arrestor system is important, but I still leave my antennas disconnected. I also use APC ups and plug strips with a high choke value

73 de Bill WW5M 




On Friday, May 8, 2020, 7:43 AM, John Canfield <bucket@...> wrote:

It's very possible the USB failure on my K3 IO board was due to lightning, we do get some lightning here occasionally. All of the radio and PC equipment run off a large APC pure sine wave UPS - I was hoping that would isolate my stuff from the AC mains but maybe the UPS is normally in bypass mode until loss of input AC. I wonder if an isolation transformer would be of any benefit?

Bob McGraw - K4TAX
 

Very often lightning comes in on the ground.  Especially where the ground system for the station is not bonded back to the AC mains ground.   The station can be off, the antennas disconnected, lightning arrestors in place, yet a difference in potential between the AC mains ground and the station ground will leave a path for current through the equipment.  

For that reason, my lightning protection is outside of the house, just before the feed lines and the rotor line enters the house.  That is part of the tower ground and is bonded to the AC mains ground, outside and around the foundation of the house.   This is per NEC.   

The fact is, I DO NOT have a ground from the outside connected to my station on the desk.   I find it is not necessary.    I maintain the 3rd wire ground back to the AC mains panel as a safety ground as required by NEC. 

From experience, a UPS does not isolate the station from the ground, likewise, an isolation transformer would not isolate the station from ground.    Review your ground design and plan.     It would seem that it is faulty. 

73
Bob, K4TAX