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The Linville Depot gets hip.


Tom Grabenstein
 

The Linville Depot gets hip.

That is the Linville Depot gets a hip roof. In following the prototype I was able to construct out of card stock a hip roof for the little depot at Linville. Here are some prototype pictures of the roof being installed during the reconstruction of the Linville Depot in North Carolina.





I had a much easier job using cardboard and Elmer's glue. Also my model is the 1921 version of the depot and is considerably shorter before the addition of an enlarged freight room. The reconstructed depot includes the later day freight room exstension.









Because of the siding behind the depot I had to truncate the hip posteriorly. This is not too evident except in the one side picture.



Next steps are styrene and plastic castings……more to come.

Thanks for looking.

Doc Tom


Chris Ford
 

Looks great Doc!

Just remember that the drawing you used for your mock-up was one of my first, but was later re-done with a corrected "freight door" on the freight room end. I think everything else on the drawing was pretty much right....never could figure out why I put that regular door on there.  :)

I always liked it best the original size for some reason. Can't wait to see it finished!




Chris

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 21:22:08 -0600, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
The Linville Depot gets hip.

That is the Linville Depot gets a hip roof. In following the prototype I was able to construct out of card stock a hip roof for the little depot at Linville. Here are some prototype pictures of the roof being installed during the reconstruction of the Linville Depot in North Carolina.





I had a much easier job using cardboard and Elmer's glue. Also my model is the 1921 version of the depot and is considerably shorter before the addition of an enlarged freight room. The reconstructed depot includes the later day freight room exstension.









Because of the siding behind the depot I had to truncate the hip posteriorly. This is not too evident except in the one side picture.



Next steps are styrene and plastic castings……more to come.

Thanks for looking.

Doc Tom


William Uffelman
 

Hip, hip, hooray! Looks good Dr Tom. Thanks for sharing your work and ideas.

Bill Uffelman


On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 12:50 AM, Chris Ford
<chris@...> wrote:
Looks great Doc!

Just remember that the drawing you used for your mock-up was one of my first, but was later re-done with a corrected "freight door" on the freight room end. I think everything else on the drawing was pretty much right....never could figure out why I put that regular door on there.  :)

I always liked it best the original size for some reason. Can't wait to see it finished!




Chris

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 21:22:08 -0600, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
The Linville Depot gets hip.

That is the Linville Depot gets a hip roof. In following the prototype I was able to construct out of card stock a hip roof for the little depot at Linville. Here are some prototype pictures of the roof being installed during the reconstruction of the Linville Depot in North Carolina.





I had a much easier job using cardboard and Elmer's glue. Also my model is the 1921 version of the depot and is considerably shorter before the addition of an enlarged freight room. The reconstructed depot includes the later day freight room exstension.









Because of the siding behind the depot I had to truncate the hip posteriorly. This is not too evident except in the one side picture.



Next steps are styrene and plastic castings……more to come.

Thanks for looking.

Doc Tom


Tweetsie12
 

Looking Good! Keep it up! 


Tom Grabenstein
 

Thank you so much for doing these drawings in “O” scale. They are a big help for this project.

 I had wondered about the freight room “door.” I thought in the early 1920’s it was primarily tourists coming to the lodge and maybe they didn’t have much more than suitcases and a little door worked just fine. But then I thought that these were fairly well-to-do travelers who would come for weeks at a time and probably brought large steamer trunks etc.

 I do have your drawing of the later date Linville Depot in the Model Railroader magazine which has a another nice “O" scale drawing with a proper freight door. I assume this is the correct freight door found on the Linville Depot even in 1921?? Your research has been part of the enjoyment of this project. Thank you for your labor of love.

Doc Tom

On Jan 15, 2020, at 11:50 PM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:

Looks great Doc!

Just remember that the drawing you used for your mock-up was one of my first, but was later re-done with a corrected "freight door" on the freight room end. I think everything else on the drawing was pretty much right....never could figure out why I put that regular door on there.  :)

I always liked it best the original size for some reason. Can't wait to see it finished!




Chris

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 21:22:08 -0600, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
The Linville Depot gets hip.

That is the Linville Depot gets a hip roof. In following the prototype I was able to construct out of card stock a hip roof for the little depot at Linville. Here are some prototype pictures of the roof being installed during the reconstruction of the Linville Depot in North Carolina.





I had a much easier job using cardboard and Elmer's glue. Also my model is the 1921 version of the depot and is considerably shorter before the addition of an enlarged freight room. The reconstructed depot includes the later day freight room exstension.









Because of the siding behind the depot I had to truncate the hip posteriorly. This is not too evident except in the one side picture.



Next steps are styrene and plastic castings……more to come.

Thanks for looking.

Doc Tom


Chris Ford
 

Glad to be of assistance!

I do have your drawing of the later date Linville Depot in the Model Railroader magazine which has a another nice “O" scale drawing with a proper freight door. I assume this is the correct freight door found on the Linville Depot even in 1921??

Yes, the depot kept the same freight door even after being enlarged. With an identical freight door on the opposite wall for loading/unloading from wagon or truck. They simply added 16 feet to the old freight room to make the expanded "new" freight room.

I say "simply".....you can probably ask Jerry how "simple" that was!  :)

Keep up the good work!



Chris
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 20:02:59 -0600, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thank you so much for doing these drawings in “O” scale. They are a big help for this project.
 
 I had wondered about the freight room “door.” I thought in the early 1920’s it was primarily tourists coming to the lodge and maybe they didn’t have much more than suitcases and a little door worked just fine. But then I thought that these were fairly well-to-do travelers who would come for weeks at a time and probably brought large steamer trunks etc.
 
 I do have your drawing of the later date Linville Depot in the Model Railroader magazine which has a another nice “O" scale drawing with a proper freight door. I assume this is the correct freight door found on the Linville Depot even in 1921?? Your research has been part of the enjoyment of this project. Thank you for your labor of love.
 
Doc Tom
 
On Jan 15, 2020, at 11:50 PM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:
 
Looks great Doc!

Just remember that the drawing you used for your mock-up was one of my first, but was later re-done with a corrected "freight door" on the freight room end. I think everything else on the drawing was pretty much right....never could figure out why I put that regular door on there.  :)

I always liked it best the original size for some reason. Can't wait to see it finished!




Chris

 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 21:22:08 -0600, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
The Linville Depot gets hip.

That is the Linville Depot gets a hip roof. In following the prototype I was able to construct out of card stock a hip roof for the little depot at Linville. Here are some prototype pictures of the roof being installed during the reconstruction of the Linville Depot in North Carolina.





I had a much easier job using cardboard and Elmer's glue. Also my model is the 1921 version of the depot and is considerably shorter before the addition of an enlarged freight room. The reconstructed depot includes the later day freight room exstension.









Because of the siding behind the depot I had to truncate the hip posteriorly. This is not too evident except in the one side picture.



Next steps are styrene and plastic castings……more to come.

Thanks for looking.

Doc Tom