Topics

Getting the lettering right for early 1920's Hopper cars.


Tom Grabenstein
 

Ahhh, the joys of Prototype model railroading.

I have completed three hopper cars to haul iron ore and coal on my planned On30 homage to the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad. I will be modeling the era 1920 – 1924 when the railroad was quite profitable and had beautiful narrow gauge passenger cars.



So, I was doing research on what I thought the prototype Hopper cars looked like.





I picked up Johnny Graybeals nicely done decal sets for freight cars in O scale at the model railroad show in Johnson City Tennessee this summer. It was also nice meeting him in person. I proceeded to carefully apply decals to the first side of a hopper car. I thought I had done a nice rendition of Hopper car Number 28.







I read on further about these fine wooden hopper cars, that were felt to be the largest wooden hopper cars in narrow gauge railroading for their time. In an article in the 2018 HOn3 Annual written by Johnny Graybeal, and including photos from his collection, I hit the jackpot on prototype pictures of Hopper cars for the ET&WNC RR. In one of the pictures he mentioned that the lettering in use by the ET and WNC from the teens until 1936 had small stenciling for the road name instead of the stretch lettering that came into vogue after 1936.



So, it was back to the paint shop and my first attempt at an early 1920s Hopper car was repainted and relettered using Johnny's very good decal sheet. But at this time with much smaller lettering. The stenciling on the decal was a bit too wide and I had to remove the “&” to get it to fit. But, I felt it was a fairly good representation of Hopper car number 18 in 1920’s livery. I am not a rivet counter, but certainly want my rolling stock to be a good representation of what road the rails in the early 1920’s in the mountains of East Tennessee and western North Carolina.







Now I have two other cars to decal correctly with the correct prototype look for the early 1920's.





Thanks for looking. Dr. Tom


Mark Lewis
 

Nice save on the first decal job.

Mark Lewis 
narrow gauge modeling in N.C.

On Sat, Aug 17, 2019, 10:13 PM Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:
Ahhh, the joys of Prototype model railroading.

I have completed three hopper cars to haul iron ore and coal on my planned On30 homage to the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad. I will be modeling the era 1920 – 1924 when the railroad was quite profitable and had beautiful narrow gauge passenger cars.



So, I was doing research on what I thought the prototype Hopper cars looked like.





I picked up Johnny Graybeals nicely done decal sets for freight cars in O scale at the model railroad show in Johnson City Tennessee this summer. It was also nice meeting him in person. I proceeded to carefully apply decals to the first side of a hopper car. I thought I had done a nice rendition of Hopper car Number 28.







I read on further about these fine wooden hopper cars, that were felt to be the largest wooden hopper cars in narrow gauge railroading for their time. In an article in the 2018 HOn3 Annual written by Johnny Graybeal, and including photos from his collection, I hit the jackpot on prototype pictures of Hopper cars for the ET&WNC RR. In one of the pictures he mentioned that the lettering in use by the ET and WNC from the teens until 1936 had small stenciling for the road name instead of the stretch lettering that came into vogue after 1936.



So, it was back to the paint shop and my first attempt at an early 1920s Hopper car was repainted and relettered using Johnny's very good decal sheet. But at this time with much smaller lettering. The stenciling on the decal was a bit too wide and I had to remove the “&” to get it to fit. But, I felt it was a fairly good representation of Hopper car number 18 in 1920’s livery. I am not a rivet counter, but certainly want my rolling stock to be a good representation of what road the rails in the early 1920’s in the mountains of East Tennessee and western North Carolina.







Now I have two other cars to decal correctly with the correct prototype look for the early 1920's.





Thanks for looking. Dr. Tom


johnny graybeal
 


Fabulous work Tom. Glad to meet you and thank you for working so hard to recreate the ET hopper car fleet.
Johnny Graybeal

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Grabenstein
Sent: Aug 17, 2019 10:13 PM
To: ETWNC@groups.io
Subject: [ETWNC] Getting the lettering right for early 1920's Hopper cars.

Ahhh, the joys of Prototype model railroading.

I have completed three hopper cars to haul iron ore and coal on my planned On30 homage to the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad. I will be modeling the era 1920 – 1924 when the railroad was quite profitable and had beautiful narrow gauge passenger cars.



So, I was doing research on what I thought the prototype Hopper cars looked like.





I picked up Johnny Graybeals nicely done decal sets for freight cars in O scale at the model railroad show in Johnson City Tennessee this summer. It was also nice meeting him in person. I proceeded to carefully apply decals to the first side of a hopper car. I thought I had done a nice rendition of Hopper car Number 28.







I read on further about these fine wooden hopper cars, that were felt to be the largest wooden hopper cars in narrow gauge railroading for their time. In an article in the 2018 HOn3 Annual written by Johnny Graybeal, and including photos from his collection, I hit the jackpot on prototype pictures of Hopper cars for the ET&WNC RR. In one of the pictures he mentioned that the lettering in use by the ET and WNC from the teens until 1936 had small stenciling for the road name instead of the stretch lettering that came into vogue after 1936.



So, it was back to the paint shop and my first attempt at an early 1920s Hopper car was repainted and relettered using Johnny's very good decal sheet. But at this time with much smaller lettering. The stenciling on the decal was a bit too wide and I had to remove the “&” to get it to fit. But, I felt it was a fairly good representation of Hopper car number 18 in 1920’s livery. I am not a rivet counter, but certainly want my rolling stock to be a good representation of what road the rails in the early 1920’s in the mountains of East Tennessee and western North Carolina.







Now I have two other cars to decal correctly with the correct prototype look for the early 1920's.





Thanks for looking. Dr. Tom


Tom Grabenstein
 

Thanks everybody. Johnny’s help greatly appreciated.

One of the hoppers is scratchbuilt and I will number it #1 as it was the first one built for my model railroad. It also has wooden bolsters like the prototype.

I'm getting a lot of questions about these interesting Rail cars on other model railroading websites. One question is did the early hoppers(early 1920s in my case) have sheet metal covering the slopes or were they bare wood as in my models? It is apparent that the post 1936 cars have sheet metal covering in the pictures I reviewed. I wonder if the bare wood would handle the daily pounding of iron ore being dumped into the cars? On the other hand, I like the individual boards and nail holes that show up without a covering. So Tweetsie RR archaeologists what do y' all think? The quest for historical accuracy continues.

Another question I have for you fine gentlemen, is what is the color of the iron ore mined at Cranberry? I will be making removable loads of coal and iron ore for these hopper cars. I think I have the color of coal down but the color of iron ore I'm not so certain. The taconite pellets I have seen are quite red and Rusty in appearance. I'm not so sure that's the good stuff coming from Cranberry was that color. Do y’ all have any thoughts on this as well?

I really appreciate the chance to discuss this with fellow fans of the ET&WNC and not sound so much like a raving rivet counter.

Doc Tom


Chris Ford
 

Good questions Tom! While I don't know about the sheet metal question, I do have a chunk of coal from the Cranberry engine house site and a lump of magnetite (very heavy and attracts a magnet) sitting on my desk. They are both basically the same color.

Now some of the chunks of magnetite mined would have had a few impurities in them and may have appeared to be a dark gray, so a mix would probably be appropriate. And of course if you had a load of spoils going to be dumped as ballast then that would have been a mix of black, dark gray and medium gray. However, I don't know if they would have hauled spoils in the ore cars or maybe gons, and of course the side dump cars. Johnny may know more about that process.




Chris



 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 09:54:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thanks everybody. Johnny’s help greatly appreciated.

One of the hoppers is scratchbuilt and I will number it #1 as it was the first one built for my model railroad. It also has wooden bolsters like the prototype.

I'm getting a lot of questions about these interesting Rail cars on other model railroading websites. One question is did the early hoppers(early 1920s in my case) have sheet metal covering the slopes or were they bare wood as in my models? It is apparent that the post 1936 cars have sheet metal covering in the pictures I reviewed. I wonder if the bare wood would handle the daily pounding of iron ore being dumped into the cars? On the other hand, I like the individual boards and nail holes that show up without a covering. So Tweetsie RR archaeologists what do y' all think? The quest for historical accuracy continues.

Another question I have for you fine gentlemen, is what is the color of the iron ore mined at Cranberry? I will be making removable loads of coal and iron ore for these hopper cars. I think I have the color of coal down but the color of iron ore I'm not so certain. The taconite pellets I have seen are quite red and Rusty in appearance. I'm not so sure that's the good stuff coming from Cranberry was that color. Do y’ all have any thoughts on this as well?

I really appreciate the chance to discuss this with fellow fans of the ET&WNC and not sound so much like a raving rivet counter.

Doc Tom


 


Tom Grabenstein
 

Thank you Chris for the very fast response. Anyway you could snap a picture or two, particularly of the magnetite? That would give a lot of information. I'm thinking we're in the dark gray/Gray/Black Colors and certainly no red color.

Doc Tom

On Aug 18, 2019, at 10:47 AM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:

Good questions Tom! While I don't know about the sheet metal question, I do have a chunk of coal from the Cranberry engine house site and a lump of magnetite (very heavy and attracts a magnet) sitting on my desk. They are both basically the same color.

Now some of the chunks of magnetite mined would have had a few impurities in them and may have appeared to be a dark gray, so a mix would probably be appropriate. And of course if you had a load of spoils going to be dumped as ballast then that would have been a mix of black, dark gray and medium gray. However, I don't know if they would have hauled spoils in the ore cars or maybe gons, and of course the side dump cars. Johnny may know more about that process.




Chris



 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 09:54:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thanks everybody. Johnny’s help greatly appreciated.

One of the hoppers is scratchbuilt and I will number it #1 as it was the first one built for my model railroad. It also has wooden bolsters like the prototype.

I'm getting a lot of questions about these interesting Rail cars on other model railroading websites. One question is did the early hoppers(early 1920s in my case) have sheet metal covering the slopes or were they bare wood as in my models? It is apparent that the post 1936 cars have sheet metal covering in the pictures I reviewed. I wonder if the bare wood would handle the daily pounding of iron ore being dumped into the cars? On the other hand, I like the individual boards and nail holes that show up without a covering. So Tweetsie RR archaeologists what do y' all think? The quest for historical accuracy continues.

Another question I have for you fine gentlemen, is what is the color of the iron ore mined at Cranberry? I will be making removable loads of coal and iron ore for these hopper cars. I think I have the color of coal down but the color of iron ore I'm not so certain. The taconite pellets I have seen are quite red and Rusty in appearance. I'm not so sure that's the good stuff coming from Cranberry was that color. Do y’ all have any thoughts on this as well?

I really appreciate the chance to discuss this with fellow fans of the ET&WNC and not sound so much like a raving rivet counter.

Doc Tom


 


Lee Bishop
 

Great work, I commented on this at the Freerails page as well.
I am curious, you kept the interior of your first lettered car as grey. But the bottom shots look like they're black inside now.
The interiors of these cars were painted black originally, weren't they?
Lee Bishop


Chris Ford
 

Here ya go....coal on the left, magnetite on the right. Included a photo with a black background to give some reference. The magnetite also has a little "sparkle" to it in places...I'm sure one of our geologists could tell us why.  :)



Chris





 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 17:22:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thank you Chris for the very fast response. Anyway you could snap a picture or two, particularly of the magnetite? That would give a lot of information. I'm thinking we're in the dark gray/Gray/Black Colors and certainly no red color.
 
Doc Tom
 
On Aug 18, 2019, at 10:47 AM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:
 
Good questions Tom! While I don't know about the sheet metal question, I do have a chunk of coal from the Cranberry engine house site and a lump of magnetite (very heavy and attracts a magnet) sitting on my desk. They are both basically the same color.

Now some of the chunks of magnetite mined would have had a few impurities in them and may have appeared to be a dark gray, so a mix would probably be appropriate. And of course if you had a load of spoils going to be dumped as ballast then that would have been a mix of black, dark gray and medium gray. However, I don't know if they would have hauled spoils in the ore cars or maybe gons, and of course the side dump cars. Johnny may know more about that process.




Chris



 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 09:54:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thanks everybody. Johnny’s help greatly appreciated.

One of the hoppers is scratchbuilt and I will number it #1 as it was the first one built for my model railroad. It also has wooden bolsters like the prototype.

I'm getting a lot of questions about these interesting Rail cars on other model railroading websites. One question is did the early hoppers(early 1920s in my case) have sheet metal covering the slopes or were they bare wood as in my models? It is apparent that the post 1936 cars have sheet metal covering in the pictures I reviewed. I wonder if the bare wood would handle the daily pounding of iron ore being dumped into the cars? On the other hand, I like the individual boards and nail holes that show up without a covering. So Tweetsie RR archaeologists what do y' all think? The quest for historical accuracy continues.

Another question I have for you fine gentlemen, is what is the color of the iron ore mined at Cranberry? I will be making removable loads of coal and iron ore for these hopper cars. I think I have the color of coal down but the color of iron ore I'm not so certain. The taconite pellets I have seen are quite red and Rusty in appearance. I'm not so sure that's the good stuff coming from Cranberry was that color. Do y’ all have any thoughts on this as well?

I really appreciate the chance to discuss this with fellow fans of the ET&WNC and not sound so much like a raving rivet counter.

Doc Tom


 


Chris Ford
 

Well, didn't mean to get the same photo in there twice. Let's try again!

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Mon, 19 Aug 2019 15:03:50 -0400, "Chris Ford" <chris@...> wrote:
 
Here ya go....coal on the left, magnetite on the right. Included a photo with a black background to give some reference. The magnetite also has a little "sparkle" to it in places...I'm sure one of our geologists could tell us why.  :)



Chris





 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 17:22:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thank you Chris for the very fast response. Anyway you could snap a picture or two, particularly of the magnetite? That would give a lot of information. I'm thinking we're in the dark gray/Gray/Black Colors and certainly no red color.
 
Doc Tom
 
On Aug 18, 2019, at 10:47 AM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:
 
Good questions Tom! While I don't know about the sheet metal question, I do have a chunk of coal from the Cranberry engine house site and a lump of magnetite (very heavy and attracts a magnet) sitting on my desk. They are both basically the same color.

Now some of the chunks of magnetite mined would have had a few impurities in them and may have appeared to be a dark gray, so a mix would probably be appropriate. And of course if you had a load of spoils going to be dumped as ballast then that would have been a mix of black, dark gray and medium gray. However, I don't know if they would have hauled spoils in the ore cars or maybe gons, and of course the side dump cars. Johnny may know more about that process.




Chris



 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 09:54:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thanks everybody. Johnny’s help greatly appreciated.

One of the hoppers is scratchbuilt and I will number it #1 as it was the first one built for my model railroad. It also has wooden bolsters like the prototype.

I'm getting a lot of questions about these interesting Rail cars on other model railroading websites. One question is did the early hoppers(early 1920s in my case) have sheet metal covering the slopes or were they bare wood as in my models? It is apparent that the post 1936 cars have sheet metal covering in the pictures I reviewed. I wonder if the bare wood would handle the daily pounding of iron ore being dumped into the cars? On the other hand, I like the individual boards and nail holes that show up without a covering. So Tweetsie RR archaeologists what do y' all think? The quest for historical accuracy continues.

Another question I have for you fine gentlemen, is what is the color of the iron ore mined at Cranberry? I will be making removable loads of coal and iron ore for these hopper cars. I think I have the color of coal down but the color of iron ore I'm not so certain. The taconite pellets I have seen are quite red and Rusty in appearance. I'm not so sure that's the good stuff coming from Cranberry was that color. Do y’ all have any thoughts on this as well?

I really appreciate the chance to discuss this with fellow fans of the ET&WNC and not sound so much like a raving rivet counter.

Doc Tom


 


Brett Day
 

Found this article and wanted to share.  https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/0735g/report.pdf  The article mentions Cranberry Furnace Co. and other mine sites in Tenn. and NC.
It appears to have been taken from a report from the 1920s. 
 
Also the sparkle may be small deposits of Mica.  Mica was mined in and around the Bakersfield and Newland, NC area.
 
Brett Day
 
 
 
 

From: Chris Ford
Sent: Monday, August 19, 2019 2:08 PM
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] Getting the lettering right for early 1920's Hopper cars.
 
Well, didn't mean to get the same photo in there twice. Let's try again!

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Mon, 19 Aug 2019 15:03:50 -0400, "Chris Ford" <chris@...> wrote:
 
Here ya go....coal on the left, magnetite on the right. Included a photo with a black background to give some reference. The magnetite also has a little "sparkle" to it in places...I'm sure one of our geologists could tell us why.  :)



Chris





 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 17:22:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thank you Chris for the very fast response. Anyway you could snap a picture or two, particularly of the magnetite? That would give a lot of information. I'm thinking we're in the dark gray/Gray/Black Colors and certainly no red color.
 
Doc Tom
 
On Aug 18, 2019, at 10:47 AM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:
 
Good questions Tom! While I don't know about the sheet metal question, I do have a chunk of coal from the Cranberry engine house site and a lump of magnetite (very heavy and attracts a magnet) sitting on my desk. They are both basically the same color.

Now some of the chunks of magnetite mined would have had a few impurities in them and may have appeared to be a dark gray, so a mix would probably be appropriate. And of course if you had a load of spoils going to be dumped as ballast then that would have been a mix of black, dark gray and medium gray. However, I don't know if they would have hauled spoils in the ore cars or maybe gons, and of course the side dump cars. Johnny may know more about that process.




Chris



 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 09:54:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thanks everybody. Johnny’s help greatly appreciated.

One of the hoppers is scratchbuilt and I will number it #1 as it was the first one built for my model railroad. It also has wooden bolsters like the prototype.

I'm getting a lot of questions about these interesting Rail cars on other model railroading websites. One question is did the early hoppers(early 1920s in my case) have sheet metal covering the slopes or were they bare wood as in my models? It is apparent that the post 1936 cars have sheet metal covering in the pictures I reviewed. I wonder if the bare wood would handle the daily pounding of iron ore being dumped into the cars? On the other hand, I like the individual boards and nail holes that show up without a covering. So Tweetsie RR archaeologists what do y' all think? The quest for historical accuracy continues.

Another question I have for you fine gentlemen, is what is the color of the iron ore mined at Cranberry? I will be making removable loads of coal and iron ore for these hopper cars. I think I have the color of coal down but the color of iron ore I'm not so certain. The taconite pellets I have seen are quite red and Rusty in appearance. I'm not so sure that's the good stuff coming from Cranberry was that color. Do y’ all have any thoughts on this as well?

I really appreciate the chance to discuss this with fellow fans of the ET&WNC and not sound so much like a raving rivet counter.

Doc Tom


 


Steve Austin
 

Brett,

Great find!

Steve Austin


On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 5:10 PM Brett Day <boone@...> wrote:
Found this article and wanted to share.  https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/0735g/report.pdf  The article mentions Cranberry Furnace Co. and other mine sites in Tenn. and NC.
It appears to have been taken from a report from the 1920s. 
 
Also the sparkle may be small deposits of Mica.  Mica was mined in and around the Bakersfield and Newland, NC area.
 
Brett Day
 
 
 
 
From: Chris Ford
Sent: Monday, August 19, 2019 2:08 PM
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] Getting the lettering right for early 1920's Hopper cars.
 
Well, didn't mean to get the same photo in there twice. Let's try again!

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Mon, 19 Aug 2019 15:03:50 -0400, "Chris Ford" <chris@...> wrote:
 
Here ya go....coal on the left, magnetite on the right. Included a photo with a black background to give some reference. The magnetite also has a little "sparkle" to it in places...I'm sure one of our geologists could tell us why.  :)



Chris





 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 17:22:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thank you Chris for the very fast response. Anyway you could snap a picture or two, particularly of the magnetite? That would give a lot of information. I'm thinking we're in the dark gray/Gray/Black Colors and certainly no red color.
 
Doc Tom
 
On Aug 18, 2019, at 10:47 AM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:
 
Good questions Tom! While I don't know about the sheet metal question, I do have a chunk of coal from the Cranberry engine house site and a lump of magnetite (very heavy and attracts a magnet) sitting on my desk. They are both basically the same color.

Now some of the chunks of magnetite mined would have had a few impurities in them and may have appeared to be a dark gray, so a mix would probably be appropriate. And of course if you had a load of spoils going to be dumped as ballast then that would have been a mix of black, dark gray and medium gray. However, I don't know if they would have hauled spoils in the ore cars or maybe gons, and of course the side dump cars. Johnny may know more about that process.




Chris



 

------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 09:54:12 -0500, "Tom Grabenstein" <tomgmd@...> wrote:
 
Thanks everybody. Johnny’s help greatly appreciated.

One of the hoppers is scratchbuilt and I will number it #1 as it was the first one built for my model railroad. It also has wooden bolsters like the prototype.

I'm getting a lot of questions about these interesting Rail cars on other model railroading websites. One question is did the early hoppers(early 1920s in my case) have sheet metal covering the slopes or were they bare wood as in my models? It is apparent that the post 1936 cars have sheet metal covering in the pictures I reviewed. I wonder if the bare wood would handle the daily pounding of iron ore being dumped into the cars? On the other hand, I like the individual boards and nail holes that show up without a covering. So Tweetsie RR archaeologists what do y' all think? The quest for historical accuracy continues.

Another question I have for you fine gentlemen, is what is the color of the iron ore mined at Cranberry? I will be making removable loads of coal and iron ore for these hopper cars. I think I have the color of coal down but the color of iron ore I'm not so certain. The taconite pellets I have seen are quite red and Rusty in appearance. I'm not so sure that's the good stuff coming from Cranberry was that color. Do y’ all have any thoughts on this as well?

I really appreciate the chance to discuss this with fellow fans of the ET&WNC and not sound so much like a raving rivet counter.

Doc Tom


 


Tom Grabenstein
 

Hi Lee,

Thank you for the observant questioning. Actually I kept the interior of the cars in primer gray and used an India ink and alcohol wash to bring out the wood grain and nail holes. That last picture was taken in poot lighting and the interiors appear black. In looking at prototype pictures I really couldn’t tell if the interiors were raw wood or painted. I elected to go with the raw look as any paint would be destroyed by Constant loading of iron ore. Also looking forward to using Bragdon Weathering powders to give the interiors a grungy look.
Doc Tom