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Combines, #15 & others


Jerry Shepardson <j.shepardson@...
 

The attached B&W jpg photo shows the letter box built into the sides of
combine 15. I assume it was so folks could drop their mail in like we
would at the Post Office today (DUH!) Was this common on an RPO? I
always assumed an RPO received it's mail in bags from the PO, not
individual letters. Was this another example of Tweetsie's down-home
service?
--
Jerry A. Shepardson

J.shepardson@...
or
CMSTC@...

The Southern Serves the South


Bob Yarger <ryarger@...>
 

Most mail was moved in sacks, but most mail cars also had such a letter
slot. They say that in the primitive days of the 1940s, a letter dropped
in the slot of a Rutland RR mail car in Rutland, VT could make it to Boston
and be delivered IN THE SAME DAY. Not quite e-mail speed, but pretty darn
good.

----------

From: Jerry Shepardson <j.shepardson@...>
To: Tweetsie group <Tweetsie@...>
Subject: [Tweetsie] Combines, #15 & others
Date: Tuesday, January 05, 1999 8:25 AM

The attached B&W jpg photo shows the letter box built into the sides of
combine 15. I assume it was so folks could drop their mail in like we
would at the Post Office today (DUH!) Was this common on an RPO? I
always assumed an RPO received it's mail in bags from the PO, not
individual letters. Was this another example of Tweetsie's down-home
service?
--
Jerry A. Shepardson

J.shepardson@...
or
CMSTC@...

The Southern Serves the South


Curtis Brookshire <curtis.brookshire@...>
 

Most, if not all RPOs had a letter slot. That is one feature of the
"working" RPO that we lost when first class mail went airborne and the rest
went sealed. Most solid mail trains carried many "storage mail" cars -
they're sealed baggage cars - and at least one working RPO. Additionally
many passenger trains had either working RPOs and/or Storage Mail cars in
their head ends. In the last 15 years or so of RR owned passenger service
the mail and express often was what paid the bills. When the Post Office
Department (USPS came along in 1970) removed mail from most trains, that
finished off the passenger business and led to Amtrak. Combine 15 and RPOs
18 and 21 were just common RPOs serving a short line.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Shepardson <j.shepardson@...>
To: Tweetsie group <Tweetsie@...>
Date: Tuesday, January 05, 1999 8:33 AM
Subject: [Tweetsie] Combines, #15 & others


The attached B&W jpg photo shows the letter box built into the sides of
combine 15. I assume it was so folks could drop their mail in like we
would at the Post Office today (DUH!) Was this common on an RPO? I
always assumed an RPO received it's mail in bags from the PO, not
individual letters. Was this another example of Tweetsie's down-home
service?
--
Jerry A. Shepardson

J.shepardson@...
or
CMSTC@...

The Southern Serves the South