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A Chestnut Tree before the blight.


Tom Grabenstein
 

Here's a little more to add to the story of the little railroad in the Blue Ridge.

A chestnut tree at Linville on the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Rail Road in the early 1920’s before the chestnut blight wiped out these magnificent trees in the Smoky Mountains and the Blue Ridge. Chestnut bark siding was used to cover several structures in Linville including the ET&WNC depot.





Now to find a suitable product to recreate this siding for the depot (in foam board mock up in the picture). Any ideas?????

Thanks for looking. Doc Tom


Dean Smith
 

Beautiful job!  When I hiked the AT three years ago, I saw so many chestnut sprouts growing out of stumps. So sad.  I know there is an attempt to cross an American Chestnut with the Chinese Chestnut to make a hybrid that can survive the blight.  I saw a small grove of these experimental trees on the trail.  Is the model a natural growth or an armature?  You did a great job on it.  BTW, my Linville station is also a cardboard mock-up until I can get around to building the actual structure. I have an old Webster Scale Models kit in HO that includes cedar shingles by Evergreen Hill Designs for the siding.  It looks like it should work well in HO.  I don’t know if such a product is available for O scale.   
Dean
 

Sent: Saturday, May 09, 2020 6:26 PM
Subject: [ETWNC] A Chestnut Tree before the blight.
 
Here's a little more to add to the story of the little railroad in the Blue Ridge.

A chestnut tree at Linville on the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Rail Road in the early 1920’s before the chestnut blight wiped out these magnificent trees in the Smoky Mountains and the Blue Ridge. Chestnut bark siding was used to cover several structures in Linville including the ET&WNC depot.





Now to find a suitable product to recreate this siding for the depot (in foam board mock up in the picture). Any ideas?????

Thanks for looking. Doc Tom


William Uffelman
 

How about cigar wrapper or crepe paper? Years ago an evergreen tree kit had  a stiff textured paper for bark.

Bill Uffelman 


On Sat, May 9, 2020 at 7:26 PM, Tom Grabenstein
<tomgmd@...> wrote:
Here's a little more to add to the story of the little railroad in the Blue Ridge.

A chestnut tree at Linville on the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Rail Road in the early 1920’s before the chestnut blight wiped out these magnificent trees in the Smoky Mountains and the Blue Ridge. Chestnut bark siding was used to cover several structures in Linville including the ET&WNC depot.





Now to find a suitable product to recreate this siding for the depot (in foam board mock up in the picture). Any ideas?????

Thanks for looking. Doc Tom


Tom Grabenstein
 

Hi Dean. The tree is from JTT miniatures with a plastic armature that I painted and weathered to try and imitate a Chestnut tree.
I also am looking at possibly using cedar “shingles” from doll house suppliers to stand in for the Chestnut Bark siding.

Here is the restored Linville Depot and I really like the unique wood siding.


Here is a photo “back in the day” that I also really like :


All Saints Episcopal Church in Linville also looks pretty sharp in Chestnut Bark siding:



I’m getting up the courage to model the depot in styrene soon………I hope.

Doc Tom


Tom Grabenstein
 

Hi Bill. Crepe paper might work particularly for some of the irregular/small shapes on the prototype. Thanks for the idea.

Doc Tom