Topics

ET-inspired area structure


Tuhr
 

Excellent!  Appreciate your sharing as not much I can do modeling wise from down under...

Tuhr Barnes


From: ETWNC@groups.io <ETWNC@groups.io> on behalf of Lee Bishop <leebishop1944@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 1:24:27 AM
To: ETWNC@groups.io <ETWNC@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] ET-inspired area structure
 
Thanks for all the info on gas pumps, everyone. Seeing that gas rationing is taking place in the time of my layout, I just don't think that you would see gas sitting in a pump like that. So, it's going to stay dry in the visible portion.
I did a little scenery work around the concrete base, added little Tufts of grass all the way around the outside edge, like you would expect in real life. I also added oil stains and drips, both new and old. I did the same onto the gravel, away from the pump, roughly about where you would expect to have seen cars sitting.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Brian Kopp
 

wow that looks good!
--
Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, Florida


Lee Bishop
 

Thanks for all the info on gas pumps, everyone. Seeing that gas rationing is taking place in the time of my layout, I just don't think that you would see gas sitting in a pump like that. So, it's going to stay dry in the visible portion.
I did a little scenery work around the concrete base, added little Tufts of grass all the way around the outside edge, like you would expect in real life. I also added oil stains and drips, both new and old. I did the same onto the gravel, away from the pump, roughly about where you would expect to have seen cars sitting.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Brian Kopp
 

Lee and David,

I had an opportunity to sit and watch a visible gas pump in action in 2010 in rural Thailand. See photo. It mostly filled scooters. If the volume in the glass cylinder was more than was needed to complete that fill-up, it sat in the cylinder until the next scooter came along. They used a long rubber hose to fill the scooters. For security I assumed they emptied the cylinder at the end of the day if there was anything left.
The hand pumping to fill the cylinder is a slow process but not too bad. It took a while to fill our mini-van but maybe only twice as long as a regular electric gas pump. 

--
Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, Florida


David Payne
 


Lee,
The tank would likely HAVE HAD gas in it during the day; at least based on the one that I saw many times during a summer in the fifties.  My cousin and I would walk (barefoot) on a dirt street and then a concrete sidewalk to purchase my aunt a pack or two of Pall Mall cigarettes, perhaps some bread, and usually a one-cent treat for each of us, but I recall that there would be gas in the bowl.  I have no idea if there was a mechanism that allowed it to be drained back into the tank or if it stayed there.  But that's the way I remember it.
David Payne
Georgia


Lee Bishop
 

Thanks again for the kind words, all!
Chris, I love the photos of that structure, but it is such a shame it burned.
Of course, you are quite correct that it bears more than a little resemblance to the structure I created.
I saved both of those photos, as I've been toying around with the idea of modeling a structure that has had a substantial fire.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Chris Ford
 

Lee, your little store/station reminded me of this actual store on the outskirts of Shell Creek. I had admired this little structure for its scale and "modelability" over the years...

http://www.cfordart.com/photoalbum/photopages/fullsizepages/2008junefullsize/3fullsize.html


As much as I'd like to think of this little building as having been a contemporary to the railroad, this little gem was built sometime after Hwy 19E was re-routed to its present location. The railroad was a short distance behind where this building was later built. Photos from 1953 show that the original 19E in this area was still on Buck Creek Road, to the north across the fields. Not sure when 19E was straightened and improved in this area, but that would date the building. Maybe someone from there could let us know. Although it dates to after the railroad was gone the building has the feel of a little store that could have been in business on the original highway when the railroad ran. Sorry for the ramble, but your structure looked so much like this one I just had to reminisce about it.


Unfortunately, as always seems to happen with abandoned wooden structures, here's what it looked like in 2011...

http://www.cfordart.com/photoalbum/photopages/fullsizepages/2011novfullsize/24fullsize.html

Keep up the good work Lee, we need more models of these little "hot" spots along the railroad!



Chris

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Tue, 02 Jun 2020 10:25:02 -0700, "Lee Bishop" <leebishop1944@...> wrote:
 
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!
The gas station/store was put into place last night on the layout. First, I had to remove the old structure, then change the ground around it. It was a much larger ‘footprint’ and I decided to change the gravel area around it, as previously I’d used much too coarse gravel. I stripped it down with a caulking knife, smeared white glue all over the area, then scattered small gravel around. It’s a clean surface right now, so eventually I’ll be adding little stuff here and there. Things like oil stains and the like. As the glue was drying, I created a set of ruts in the gravel, and it dried like that, alongside the store. I was happy with that result.
I needed to put down a base for the gas pump and the front roof supports, so I had painted a section of styrene, and scraped equal segments. With the paint already dried, I added small lines of glue along those seams/cracks and put ground foam on that to show grass popping up. Eventually, I’ll add ground foam around the edge. When I added the gravel base, I recessed the ‘concrete’ into that and now that it’s dried, it does not look like it was just sat in place.
I almost held my breath the entire time I drilled a hole through the floor, through which to run the wires for the interior lights. I used a large bit but drilled very slowly. It all worked out well, and I also added figures inside while I was waiting for the scenery glue to dry. The original structure was close to the road, and this one is much further back, leaving a larger area on which I can park wheeled vehicles. 
One funny thing I noticed when I looked at the lighting on with the room dark, the roof is partially translucent! Two thick sheets of styrene and a layer of paint and weathering powers wasn’t enough. I guess I’ll have to paint in the inside of the ceiling black, but I don’t do night ops, so there’s no burning hurry for that…
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


William Uffelman
 

Looked good before - looks great now!

Bill Uffelman 


On Tue, Jun 2, 2020 at 1:25 PM, Lee Bishop
<leebishop1944@...> wrote:
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!
The gas station/store was put into place last night on the layout. First, I had to remove the old structure, then change the ground around it. It was a much larger ‘footprint’ and I decided to change the gravel area around it, as previously I’d used much too coarse gravel. I stripped it down with a caulking knife, smeared white glue all over the area, then scattered small gravel around. It’s a clean surface right now, so eventually I’ll be adding little stuff here and there. Things like oil stains and the like. As the glue was drying, I created a set of ruts in the gravel, and it dried like that, alongside the store. I was happy with that result.
I needed to put down a base for the gas pump and the front roof supports, so I had painted a section of styrene, and scraped equal segments. With the paint already dried, I added small lines of glue along those seams/cracks and put ground foam on that to show grass popping up. Eventually, I’ll add ground foam around the edge. When I added the gravel base, I recessed the ‘concrete’ into that and now that it’s dried, it does not look like it was just sat in place.
I almost held my breath the entire time I drilled a hole through the floor, through which to run the wires for the interior lights. I used a large bit but drilled very slowly. It all worked out well, and I also added figures inside while I was waiting for the scenery glue to dry. The original structure was close to the road, and this one is much further back, leaving a larger area on which I can park wheeled vehicles. 
One funny thing I noticed when I looked at the lighting on with the room dark, the roof is partially translucent! Two thick sheets of styrene and a layer of paint and weathering powers wasn’t enough. I guess I’ll have to paint in the inside of the ceiling black, but I don’t do night ops, so there’s no burning hurry for that…
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Lee Bishop
 

Thanks for the kind words, everyone!
The gas station/store was put into place last night on the layout. First, I had to remove the old structure, then change the ground around it. It was a much larger ‘footprint’ and I decided to change the gravel area around it, as previously I’d used much too coarse gravel. I stripped it down with a caulking knife, smeared white glue all over the area, then scattered small gravel around. It’s a clean surface right now, so eventually I’ll be adding little stuff here and there. Things like oil stains and the like. As the glue was drying, I created a set of ruts in the gravel, and it dried like that, alongside the store. I was happy with that result.
I needed to put down a base for the gas pump and the front roof supports, so I had painted a section of styrene, and scraped equal segments. With the paint already dried, I added small lines of glue along those seams/cracks and put ground foam on that to show grass popping up. Eventually, I’ll add ground foam around the edge. When I added the gravel base, I recessed the ‘concrete’ into that and now that it’s dried, it does not look like it was just sat in place.
I almost held my breath the entire time I drilled a hole through the floor, through which to run the wires for the interior lights. I used a large bit but drilled very slowly. It all worked out well, and I also added figures inside while I was waiting for the scenery glue to dry. The original structure was close to the road, and this one is much further back, leaving a larger area on which I can park wheeled vehicles. 
One funny thing I noticed when I looked at the lighting on with the room dark, the roof is partially translucent! Two thick sheets of styrene and a layer of paint and weathering powers wasn’t enough. I guess I’ll have to paint in the inside of the ceiling black, but I don’t do night ops, so there’s no burning hurry for that…
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Mike West
 

I’ve walked through many a screen door like that one! You’ve modeled it very well!
Mike West, Wando SC


On Jun 1, 2020, at 1:55 PM, William Uffelman via groups.io <ufffam@...> wrote:


Nicely done. Looking forward to the finished scene.

Bill Uffelman

On Monday, June 1, 2020, 10:54:20 AM EDT, Lee Bishop <leebishop1944@...> wrote:


This weekend, I finished the gas pump, though the kit was a real nightmare to build, without any instructions. I used original photographs of pumps to try to figure it out. I then decided not to model it with gas in the bowl, because it wouldn't just be sitting there like that. I also redid the Pet Milk sign on the side, and did a Sunbeam bread advertising bar on the screen door. I realized those were actually very common in that time and place...
I took some sheet plastic, carved it into a grid, and carved some cracks in it. It is going to be used under the front roof supports, and the gas pump will sit on that. Fuel stains and grass between the cracks will be added once the paint dries.
Once I am done with that, I'm going to add some figures on the inside, then re-scenic the spot for it and get it into place. It should be up and running by next week, I would think.
<0531202224b-01.jpeg>
<0531202224-01.jpeg>
<0531202224a-01.jpeg>

--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge
<0531202224-01.jpeg>
<0531202224a-01.jpeg>
<0531202224b-01.jpeg>


Tom Grabenstein
 

Very nicely done. Really like the weathering and the signage. Doc Tom


On Mon, Jun 1, 2020 at 10:59 AM William Uffelman via groups.io <ufffam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Nicely done. Looking forward to the finished scene.

Bill Uffelman

On Monday, June 1, 2020, 10:54:20 AM EDT, Lee Bishop <leebishop1944@...> wrote:


This weekend, I finished the gas pump, though the kit was a real nightmare to build, without any instructions. I used original photographs of pumps to try to figure it out. I then decided not to model it with gas in the bowl, because it wouldn't just be sitting there like that. I also redid the Pet Milk sign on the side, and did a Sunbeam bread advertising bar on the screen door. I realized those were actually very common in that time and place...
I took some sheet plastic, carved it into a grid, and carved some cracks in it. It is going to be used under the front roof supports, and the gas pump will sit on that. Fuel stains and grass between the cracks will be added once the paint dries.
Once I am done with that, I'm going to add some figures on the inside, then re-scenic the spot for it and get it into place. It should be up and running by next week, I would think.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


William Uffelman
 

Nicely done. Looking forward to the finished scene.

Bill Uffelman

On Monday, June 1, 2020, 10:54:20 AM EDT, Lee Bishop <leebishop1944@...> wrote:


This weekend, I finished the gas pump, though the kit was a real nightmare to build, without any instructions. I used original photographs of pumps to try to figure it out. I then decided not to model it with gas in the bowl, because it wouldn't just be sitting there like that. I also redid the Pet Milk sign on the side, and did a Sunbeam bread advertising bar on the screen door. I realized those were actually very common in that time and place...
I took some sheet plastic, carved it into a grid, and carved some cracks in it. It is going to be used under the front roof supports, and the gas pump will sit on that. Fuel stains and grass between the cracks will be added once the paint dries.
Once I am done with that, I'm going to add some figures on the inside, then re-scenic the spot for it and get it into place. It should be up and running by next week, I would think.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Tweetsie12
 

Very Nice Lee! That structure is looking quite nice!


Lee Bishop
 

This weekend, I finished the gas pump, though the kit was a real nightmare to build, without any instructions. I used original photographs of pumps to try to figure it out. I then decided not to model it with gas in the bowl, because it wouldn't just be sitting there like that. I also redid the Pet Milk sign on the side, and did a Sunbeam bread advertising bar on the screen door. I realized those were actually very common in that time and place...
I took some sheet plastic, carved it into a grid, and carved some cracks in it. It is going to be used under the front roof supports, and the gas pump will sit on that. Fuel stains and grass between the cracks will be added once the paint dries.
Once I am done with that, I'm going to add some figures on the inside, then re-scenic the spot for it and get it into place. It should be up and running by next week, I would think.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Dean Smith
 

Beautiful job!  Thanks for sharing.


Tuhr
 

Great model!  Thanks for sharing.

Tuhr Barnes


From: ETWNC@groups.io <ETWNC@groups.io> on behalf of Lee Bishop <leebishop1944@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2020 6:50:32 AM
To: ETWNC@groups.io <ETWNC@groups.io>
Subject: [ETWNC] ET-inspired area structure
 
While not an actual structure along the ET&WNC, I thought some of you could appreciate it anyway. This O scale store is to replace the Woodland Scenics structure I have had on the layout since it was just plywood. And to be fair, it’s a lot like that structure. I liked it, but most of the other structures I have are scratch built, so this (slightly modified) pre-built always felt like a cheat to me.
I made this with sheet styrene I already had on hand, and I then designed the building on paper, inspired (though hardly re-creating) a small wood gas station at Carter, TN, along Stoney Creek road. It will represent the Grindstaff store at Sadie (of which, no photos are known to exist).
The only things missing are the Texaco sign and post (will be made from photos of an excellent condition original round brand sign), the gas pump itself (from a Wiseman models kit) and some figures (which I have, just haven’t placed yet).
The interior wallpaper was done from a single printed sheet I bought off eBay a long time ago. I scanned it, put the trim and wallpaper together on the computer, and then printed enough sheets to cover these walls. I placed them before the walls were assembled with the floor. I have since added a few wartime signs, including a “don’t share secrets” one right next to the phone, where you’d expect it during the war. The floor board pattern is also printed.
Most other parts are either resin, plastic or metal castings. I made the counter myself (it really needs a cash register and some items scattered on top).
The signs were found online and printed onto photo paper. I was especially glad to finally find a pre-war Pet Milk sign, and that went on around the corner so viewers of the layout can really see it. On trips to the area growing up, I saw Pet Milk signs and products in every store we saw, so I had to have that. The other brands, I found notations that they were sold in the area, as well. I’m still looking for an ad push bar for the screen door, for a local brand of some type. As for the screen door, that is a Grandt Line casting with veil material I bought at an art supply store (it even was the right color), placed behind.
I had to model the windows in an open position so people can catch glimpses inside when it’s lit. I’m going to run a yellow-tint LED inside, run off my WS ‘plug and play’ lighting system. There is an electrical junction box modelled on the outside, and the current single power line on the layout will tie into it, making it the only electrically lit structure seen on the layout (as the rural electrification act is still about 5 years away and only buildings along Stoney Creek Road had power back then).
Anyway, I hope you like it!
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Tom Grabenstein
 

Beautiful model. That will look great on your layout. Dr. Tom


On May 29, 2020, at 3:50 PM, Lee Bishop <leebishop1944@...> wrote:


While not an actual structure along the ET&WNC, I thought some of you could appreciate it anyway. This O scale store is to replace the Woodland Scenics structure I have had on the layout since it was just plywood. And to be fair, it’s a lot like that structure. I liked it, but most of the other structures I have are scratch built, so this (slightly modified) pre-built always felt like a cheat to me.
I made this with sheet styrene I already had on hand, and I then designed the building on paper, inspired (though hardly re-creating) a small wood gas station at Carter, TN, along Stoney Creek road. It will represent the Grindstaff store at Sadie (of which, no photos are known to exist).
The only things missing are the Texaco sign and post (will be made from photos of an excellent condition original round brand sign), the gas pump itself (from a Wiseman models kit) and some figures (which I have, just haven’t placed yet).
The interior wallpaper was done from a single printed sheet I bought off eBay a long time ago. I scanned it, put the trim and wallpaper together on the computer, and then printed enough sheets to cover these walls. I placed them before the walls were assembled with the floor. I have since added a few wartime signs, including a “don’t share secrets” one right next to the phone, where you’d expect it during the war. The floor board pattern is also printed.
Most other parts are either resin, plastic or metal castings. I made the counter myself (it really needs a cash register and some items scattered on top).
The signs were found online and printed onto photo paper. I was especially glad to finally find a pre-war Pet Milk sign, and that went on around the corner so viewers of the layout can really see it. On trips to the area growing up, I saw Pet Milk signs and products in every store we saw, so I had to have that. The other brands, I found notations that they were sold in the area, as well. I’m still looking for an ad push bar for the screen door, for a local brand of some type. As for the screen door, that is a Grandt Line casting with veil material I bought at an art supply store (it even was the right color), placed behind.
I had to model the windows in an open position so people can catch glimpses inside when it’s lit. I’m going to run a yellow-tint LED inside, run off my WS ‘plug and play’ lighting system. There is an electrical junction box modelled on the outside, and the current single power line on the layout will tie into it, making it the only electrically lit structure seen on the layout (as the rural electrification act is still about 5 years away and only buildings along Stoney Creek Road had power back then).
Anyway, I hope you like it!
<0527201419-01-01.jpeg>
<0529201327-01.jpeg>
<0527201419b-01.jpeg>
<0527201419c-01.jpeg>
<0527202311-01.jpeg>
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


William Uffelman
 

Need a couple of guys playing checkers on the porch and a bystander watching. Hound dog sleeping too.

Looks good.

Bill Uffelman


On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 4:50 PM, Lee Bishop
<leebishop1944@...> wrote:
While not an actual structure along the ET&WNC, I thought some of you could appreciate it anyway. This O scale store is to replace the Woodland Scenics structure I have had on the layout since it was just plywood. And to be fair, it’s a lot like that structure. I liked it, but most of the other structures I have are scratch built, so this (slightly modified) pre-built always felt like a cheat to me.
I made this with sheet styrene I already had on hand, and I then designed the building on paper, inspired (though hardly re-creating) a small wood gas station at Carter, TN, along Stoney Creek road. It will represent the Grindstaff store at Sadie (of which, no photos are known to exist).
The only things missing are the Texaco sign and post (will be made from photos of an excellent condition original round brand sign), the gas pump itself (from a Wiseman models kit) and some figures (which I have, just haven’t placed yet).
The interior wallpaper was done from a single printed sheet I bought off eBay a long time ago. I scanned it, put the trim and wallpaper together on the computer, and then printed enough sheets to cover these walls. I placed them before the walls were assembled with the floor. I have since added a few wartime signs, including a “don’t share secrets” one right next to the phone, where you’d expect it during the war. The floor board pattern is also printed.
Most other parts are either resin, plastic or metal castings. I made the counter myself (it really needs a cash register and some items scattered on top).
The signs were found online and printed onto photo paper. I was especially glad to finally find a pre-war Pet Milk sign, and that went on around the corner so viewers of the layout can really see it. On trips to the area growing up, I saw Pet Milk signs and products in every store we saw, so I had to have that. The other brands, I found notations that they were sold in the area, as well. I’m still looking for an ad push bar for the screen door, for a local brand of some type. As for the screen door, that is a Grandt Line casting with veil material I bought at an art supply store (it even was the right color), placed behind.
I had to model the windows in an open position so people can catch glimpses inside when it’s lit. I’m going to run a yellow-tint LED inside, run off my WS ‘plug and play’ lighting system. There is an electrical junction box modelled on the outside, and the current single power line on the layout will tie into it, making it the only electrically lit structure seen on the layout (as the rural electrification act is still about 5 years away and only buildings along Stoney Creek Road had power back then).
Anyway, I hope you like it!
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Lee Bishop
 

While not an actual structure along the ET&WNC, I thought some of you could appreciate it anyway. This O scale store is to replace the Woodland Scenics structure I have had on the layout since it was just plywood. And to be fair, it’s a lot like that structure. I liked it, but most of the other structures I have are scratch built, so this (slightly modified) pre-built always felt like a cheat to me.
I made this with sheet styrene I already had on hand, and I then designed the building on paper, inspired (though hardly re-creating) a small wood gas station at Carter, TN, along Stoney Creek road. It will represent the Grindstaff store at Sadie (of which, no photos are known to exist).
The only things missing are the Texaco sign and post (will be made from photos of an excellent condition original round brand sign), the gas pump itself (from a Wiseman models kit) and some figures (which I have, just haven’t placed yet).
The interior wallpaper was done from a single printed sheet I bought off eBay a long time ago. I scanned it, put the trim and wallpaper together on the computer, and then printed enough sheets to cover these walls. I placed them before the walls were assembled with the floor. I have since added a few wartime signs, including a “don’t share secrets” one right next to the phone, where you’d expect it during the war. The floor board pattern is also printed.
Most other parts are either resin, plastic or metal castings. I made the counter myself (it really needs a cash register and some items scattered on top).
The signs were found online and printed onto photo paper. I was especially glad to finally find a pre-war Pet Milk sign, and that went on around the corner so viewers of the layout can really see it. On trips to the area growing up, I saw Pet Milk signs and products in every store we saw, so I had to have that. The other brands, I found notations that they were sold in the area, as well. I’m still looking for an ad push bar for the screen door, for a local brand of some type. As for the screen door, that is a Grandt Line casting with veil material I bought at an art supply store (it even was the right color), placed behind.
I had to model the windows in an open position so people can catch glimpses inside when it’s lit. I’m going to run a yellow-tint LED inside, run off my WS ‘plug and play’ lighting system. There is an electrical junction box modelled on the outside, and the current single power line on the layout will tie into it, making it the only electrically lit structure seen on the layout (as the rural electrification act is still about 5 years away and only buildings along Stoney Creek Road had power back then).
Anyway, I hope you like it!
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge