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WP&Y fire photos


Tweetsie12
 

Fair Point.  It's still a crying shame that they had to suffer the fate of scrap before the 2 middle children of the class. Oh Well, at least #12 is still with us. That's something I'll always be grateful though.


Lee Bishop
 

Don't forget, engine number 11 was offered for public display after the railroad was folded in 1950, and nobody took them up on it.
I think that if 10 and/or 14 had survived the fire, they probably would have been turned into razor blade long ago anyway.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Tweetsie12
 

Thanks for sharing your theory Lee. It really is a crying shame they weren't rebuilt. I honestly think Tweetsie Railroad would've loved to have gotten their hands on both of them had they either survived the fire or were rebuilt. But if 10 and 14 were preserved, then there's a good chance 190 would've met the same fate as the 2 Ten Wheelers did.


Lee Bishop
 

Why did they get scrapped?
That’s a good question.
Given this occurred well after the tide of the war turned against the Japanese and they were no longer a threat to the west coast (and the ALCAN highway and CANOL pipeline projects were complete by then), I guess the Army decided it wasn’t worth the effort to get two engines running again. Keep in mind, they had several Army class S118 2-8-2s, the WP&Y engines from before the war, and several D&RGW K-28s on the line by then. The former ET&WNC Baldwin ten-wheelers were the only of their type on the line. Maybe the “B” company of the 770th Railway Operating Battalion was happy to be rid of two dissimilar class locomotives to worry about.
10 and 14 were put away somewhere until the end of the war, shipped down to Seattle when the Army turned over the line back to the WP&Y. They both wound up at the Northern Pacific yard at Auburn, WA and were both scrapped there sometime in 1946.
One photo clearly shows #10 as the number plate is still attached to the smoke box door. That means the plate is likely still around, maybe hanging on the back of some cabin door in the Yukon somewhere. Man, what any of us would give to find that! Photos of both engines in the scrap line at Auburn show the number and builder plates already gone, so someone yanked them off somewhere along the way.
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge


Tom Grabenstein
 

Thanks for sharing these sullen photos. Beautiful Baldwins lost to posterity.  Doc Tom


On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 9:26 AM Tweetsie12 <jonahsnyder12190@...> wrote:
Thanks for sharing these rare, if sad photographs. I've always wondered if the 2 ET&WNC girls could've been rebuilt. Both Reading 2101 and the Durango & Silverton Locomotives both were involved in roundhouse fires, and they were preserved, so why didn't the White Pass decide to rebuild them? Were they just consider too far gone?


Tweetsie12
 

Thanks for sharing these rare, if sad photographs. I've always wondered if the 2 ET&WNC girls could've been rebuilt. Both Reading 2101 and the Durango & Silverton Locomotives both were involved in roundhouse fires, and they were preserved, so why didn't the White Pass decide to rebuild them? Were they just consider too far gone?


Lee Bishop
 

I managed to find some photographs of the two Tweetsie engines that were destroyed in a fire at The Engine House at Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory, around Christmas 1943. I've never seen these shots before, and one of them is clearly number 10. The other one is number 14
--
Lee Bishop
Owner, Stoney Creek branch of the ET&WNC in On30 gauge