Date   

Re: "Jesus saves" rocks?

Ken Riddle
 

These were very common in that era in our area.  Plus it’s a great story 


Ken


On May 6, 2019, at 9:23 PM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:

It's not the same wording, but I shot a photo of this one in 2002...

http://www.cfordart.com/photoalbum/photopages/fullsizepages/2002junefullsize/44fullsize.html

  Chris
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Mon, 06 May 2019 16:07:10 -0700, "Lee Bishop" wrote:
 
I was thinking of including a O scale "Jesus Saves" rock on my layout on the side of Stoney Creek Road, as mentioned in the "Tweetsie Country" book when it occurred to me that I've never seen (or even heard) of such a thing in that area, other than the mention in that book and a crude drawing of one.
How common were these really? I didn't know the area until the 70s when I was a kid but I never saw even a faded message like that long a road (but countless "See Rock City" and other types of 'ghost' barn paintings from decades before).
Does anyone know if this really was a common 'thing' in the region back then? I model the 40s, if this was ever a thing, was it earlier than that?
Lee Bishop
https://www.freewebs.com/willysmb44/modeltrains.htm


Re: "Jesus saves" rocks?

gftolhurst
 

I remember “Jesus Saves” signs all over North Georgia as a kid in the 1950s. 

Fred Tolhurst 

Maryville, TN


On May 6, 2019, at 9:23 PM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:

It's not the same wording, but I shot a photo of this one in 2002...

http://www.cfordart.com/photoalbum/photopages/fullsizepages/2002junefullsize/44fullsize.html

  Chris
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Mon, 06 May 2019 16:07:10 -0700, "Lee Bishop" wrote:
 
I was thinking of including a O scale "Jesus Saves" rock on my layout on the side of Stoney Creek Road, as mentioned in the "Tweetsie Country" book when it occurred to me that I've never seen (or even heard) of such a thing in that area, other than the mention in that book and a crude drawing of one.
How common were these really? I didn't know the area until the 70s when I was a kid but I never saw even a faded message like that long a road (but countless "See Rock City" and other types of 'ghost' barn paintings from decades before).
Does anyone know if this really was a common 'thing' in the region back then? I model the 40s, if this was ever a thing, was it earlier than that?
Lee Bishop
https://www.freewebs.com/willysmb44/modeltrains.htm


Re: "Jesus saves" rocks?

Chris Ford
 

It's not the same wording, but I shot a photo of this one in 2002...

http://www.cfordart.com/photoalbum/photopages/fullsizepages/2002junefullsize/44fullsize.html

  Chris
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Mon, 06 May 2019 16:07:10 -0700, "Lee Bishop" wrote:
 
I was thinking of including a O scale "Jesus Saves" rock on my layout on the side of Stoney Creek Road, as mentioned in the "Tweetsie Country" book when it occurred to me that I've never seen (or even heard) of such a thing in that area, other than the mention in that book and a crude drawing of one.
How common were these really? I didn't know the area until the 70s when I was a kid but I never saw even a faded message like that long a road (but countless "See Rock City" and other types of 'ghost' barn paintings from decades before).
Does anyone know if this really was a common 'thing' in the region back then? I model the 40s, if this was ever a thing, was it earlier than that?
Lee Bishop
https://www.freewebs.com/willysmb44/modeltrains.htm


"Jesus saves" rocks?

Lee Bishop
 

I was thinking of including a O scale "Jesus Saves" rock on my layout on the side of Stoney Creek Road, as mentioned in the "Tweetsie Country" book when it occurred to me that I've never seen (or even heard) of such a thing in that area, other than the mention in that book and a crude drawing of one.
How common were these really? I didn't know the area until the 70s when I was a kid but I never saw even a faded message like that long a road (but countless "See Rock City" and other types of 'ghost' barn paintings from decades before).
Does anyone know if this really was a common 'thing' in the region back then? I model the 40s, if this was ever a thing, was it earlier than that?
Lee Bishop
https://www.freewebs.com/willysmb44/modeltrains.htm


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Lee Bishop
 

Oh my gosh, thanks for posting this! I especially loved the school bus, as I've been trying to determine what a Carter County school bus would have looked like (though I don't think anyone makes such a bus in O scale, though).
As a modeler, this is the kind of stuff people rarely thought to record, and it's a gold mine of info for anyone wanting to do a ET&WNC layout in the 40s!
I had no family in Hampton but my uncles would have been kids at the time, and my parents would have been 4 or 5 at the time, not far away, on Stoney Creek...
Wow!
Lee Bishop
https://www.freewebs.com/willysmb44/modeltrains.htm


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

David Pressley
 

The Queen City Trailways Bus bound for Charlotte too. How cool is that? 

David




On Sunday, May 5, 2019, 1:37:49 PM EDT, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:


I love this stuff!

With the speculation on when the movie(s) were shot I thought it deserved some additonal sleuthing. I guess we don't know if these movies were all shot at the same time, but it does look like they could have been from about the same general time frame.

I know the "new" 19E highway bridges at tunnel 1 were built "around" 1941 and they looked "brand spanking new" in the film. I also wondered if the school scenes were shot because of some important date, maybe the first day of school? The foliage in the outdoor scenes looked like it could have been late summer/early fall and there was a football scrimage so that fits with early in the school year.

Checking through the footage I found one calendar on the wall (girls in a classroom) and while you can't read the month or year, the month shown had many letters (like September) and more importantly had 30 days, which leads me to speculate that it was either September or November. The foliage in the outdoor scenes looks late-summer green so I don't think it was November. The calendar was on a month that started on Sunday, so if it was September then the only year in the vicinity of the early 40s where September started on Sunday was 1940.

The weather, the clothing, the cars, the bridges, school and the calendar all lead me to guess it's September of 1940. If it was September of 1940 then it was not long after the "flood".

Others?

  Chris
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Tue, 30 Apr 2019 15:25:04 -0700, "Rae Augenstein" wrote:
 
Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398? ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Chris Ford
 

I love this stuff!

With the speculation on when the movie(s) were shot I thought it deserved some additonal sleuthing. I guess we don't know if these movies were all shot at the same time, but it does look like they could have been from about the same general time frame.

I know the "new" 19E highway bridges at tunnel 1 were built "around" 1941 and they looked "brand spanking new" in the film. I also wondered if the school scenes were shot because of some important date, maybe the first day of school? The foliage in the outdoor scenes looked like it could have been late summer/early fall and there was a football scrimage so that fits with early in the school year.

Checking through the footage I found one calendar on the wall (girls in a classroom) and while you can't read the month or year, the month shown had many letters (like September) and more importantly had 30 days, which leads me to speculate that it was either September or November. The foliage in the outdoor scenes looks late-summer green so I don't think it was November. The calendar was on a month that started on Sunday, so if it was September then the only year in the vicinity of the early 40s where September started on Sunday was 1940.

The weather, the clothing, the cars, the bridges, school and the calendar all lead me to guess it's September of 1940. If it was September of 1940 then it was not long after the "flood".

Others?

  Chris
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Tue, 30 Apr 2019 15:25:04 -0700, "Rae Augenstein" wrote:
 
Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398?ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

John Braly
 

This was probably filmed in the very early 40s.  If you notice the white wooden church, I think this is the one that sat nest to our house.  When that church burned it cared some of our picket fence and the pear tree in the side yard.  Our hose was completed in 1939. old Dock Hardin house.  In the late 40s the Baptist parsonage was built on that site.

John Braly


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Mark Milbourne
 

Yeah, that’s a great find.    The bus is coming over the bridge toward the Depot, so yes probably from Johnson City after a stop in Elizabethton.   But there may have been another route coming thru Bristol, so you never know.  In any case, it would continue along thru Rittertown to Roan Mountain and eventually to Charlotte, per it’s signboard.

 

The highway relocation looks ALMOST finished.   There are no stripes on the road and no traffic except the truck (driving in the middle of the bridge with no lanes yet marked) which then is likely part of the work being finished.

 

Great observation about all the grass on the mountains.    Much off the area was logged off in the early part of the century, so it makes sense that most of the second growth that we have now was still minimal at that time.

 

 

From: ETWNC@groups.io [mailto:ETWNC@groups.io] On Behalf Of Curtis Brookshire via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, May 03, 2019 4:12 PM
To: ETWNC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

 

I'm behind my time on replying. What a wonderful window in time! Even if there is little on the railroad and no train, we all know what the train looks like, but we haven't seen this much of Hampton. Notice the color of the buildings and how they weather - important stuff for modelers. You can see the red windows on the depot. There's that Queen City Trailways bus coming through bound for Charlotte NC. Bet it came from the Johnson City bus depot - which just happened to be shared with a certain railroad. Notice how much grass there is on the mountains, not a solid block of trees like in our time. Also notice the people which make up the lions share of the movie. Some of the elderly look like they may have less than a full mouth of teeth. I'm struck by how many of the boys are wearing overalls. It just never occurred to me. As pointed out earlier, the youngest ones, if still living, would be well into their 80's now. The older boys will probably be in uniform soon, serving in World War II. The older girls may one day ride the emergency commuter trains to Port Rayon to work at NARC and Bemberg.

Now when was this filmed? Hard to tell by fashion or vehicles. The women's hair styles scream 1940s. It appears that this was shot just after highway 19E was relocated above the ET right of way; where it would be until rebuilt to 4 lanes, 50 years later. The Stemwinder articles on Hampton state that the highway relocation was finished in 1941, which leads me to think we're looking at late summer/early fall 1941. Travelers without a car would ride that Trailways bus, the ET having discontinued passenger service the previous year. I hope some more of these home movies will surface in the future.

Curtis Brookshire
Pine Level, NC


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Curtis Brookshire
 

I'm behind my time on replying. What a wonderful window in time! Even if there is little on the railroad and no train, we all know what the train looks like, but we haven't seen this much of Hampton. Notice the color of the buildings and how they weather - important stuff for modelers. You can see the red windows on the depot. There's that Queen City Trailways bus coming through bound for Charlotte NC. Bet it came from the Johnson City bus depot - which just happened to be shared with a certain railroad. Notice how much grass there is on the mountains, not a solid block of trees like in our time. Also notice the people which make up the lions share of the movie. Some of the elderly look like they may have less than a full mouth of teeth. I'm struck by how many of the boys are wearing overalls. It just never occurred to me. As pointed out earlier, the youngest ones, if still living, would be well into their 80's now. The older boys will probably be in uniform soon, serving in World War II. The older girls may one day ride the emergency commuter trains to Port Rayon to work at NARC and Bemberg.

Now when was this filmed? Hard to tell by fashion or vehicles. The women's hair styles scream 1940s. It appears that this was shot just after highway 19E was relocated above the ET right of way; where it would be until rebuilt to 4 lanes, 50 years later. The Stemwinder articles on Hampton state that the highway relocation was finished in 1941, which leads me to think we're looking at late summer/early fall 1941. Travelers without a car would ride that Trailways bus, the ET having discontinued passenger service the previous year. I hope some more of these home movies will surface in the future.

Curtis Brookshire
Pine Level, NC


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

John Braly
 

So very nice to see Hampton as I remembered it growing up.  Things changed dramatically after the 4 lane was completed.  I wish I knew who more of these people were.  I only recognized three of them.  

John Braly
great grandson of Lum Johnson

On Wednesday, May 1, 2019, 05:12:50 PM EDT, Jonathan Pleasant via Groups.Io <sigmunddragonslayer@...> wrote:


Did you notice the older guy at the depot is the same at the hardware next door? Was he associated with both or just wanted to get filmed twice?




On Wednesday, May 1, 2019, 5:00 PM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:

You're right...not enough RR stuff...but is there ever enough?  :)

Thanks for sharing Rae.

Wonder if anyone saw any of their relatives in there? Even the youngest ones at school would probably be in their late 80s now.
Thanks again!


Chris

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Tue, 30 Apr 2019 15:25:04 -0700, "Rae Augenstein" wrote:
 
Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398? ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Jonathan Pleasant
 

Did you notice the older guy at the depot is the same at the hardware next door? Was he associated with both or just wanted to get filmed twice?




On Wednesday, May 1, 2019, 5:00 PM, Chris Ford <chris@...> wrote:

You're right...not enough RR stuff...but is there ever enough?  :)

Thanks for sharing Rae.

Wonder if anyone saw any of their relatives in there? Even the youngest ones at school would probably be in their late 80s now.
Thanks again!


Chris

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Tue, 30 Apr 2019 15:25:04 -0700, "Rae Augenstein" wrote:
 
Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398? ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Chris Ford
 

You're right...not enough RR stuff...but is there ever enough?  :)

Thanks for sharing Rae.

Wonder if anyone saw any of their relatives in there? Even the youngest ones at school would probably be in their late 80s now.
Thanks again!


Chris

 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Tue, 30 Apr 2019 15:25:04 -0700, "Rae Augenstein" wrote:
 
Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398?ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Re: Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Michael Hardin
 

Thanks for sharing. That was great.

On Apr 30, 2019, at 6:25 PM, Rae Augenstein <GetGlowing@...> wrote:

Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398?ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Rae Augenstein
 

Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398?ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Ken Riddle
 

Ha!  I don’t know why anybody would want to mix up that nasty paint stuff!!

Ken


On Apr 19, 2019, at 10:42 AM, Steve Austin <sea110947@...> wrote:

Ken, you are a wealth of information. Mostly useful😁

-------- Original message --------
From: Ken Riddle <keriddle@...>
Date: 4/19/19 9:46 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

The lampblack was added to the linseed oil at 53 percent black and 46 percent oil with one percent Japan Drier.  That makes what is called “semi-paste”.  To paint with it it was mixed two parts semi paste to three parts boiled linseed oil.  It’s nasty stuff but it will make anything black.

Uncle Big John Lewis’ oldest boy Herbert worked in the summers for his Grandpa, William Lewis, who was B&B super.  One of his jobs every summer was painting all the water tanks.  He told me this was about like painting with asphalt!  Nasty stuff.

Herbert died a few years back and I think he was 102 years old.


On Apr 18, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Steve Austin <sea110947@...>
 

Ken, you are a wealth of information. Mostly useful😁

-------- Original message --------
From: Ken Riddle <keriddle@...>
Date: 4/19/19 9:46 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: ETWNC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

The lampblack was added to the linseed oil at 53 percent black and 46 percent oil with one percent Japan Drier.  That makes what is called “semi-paste”.  To paint with it it was mixed two parts semi paste to three parts boiled linseed oil.  It’s nasty stuff but it will make anything black.

Uncle Big John Lewis’ oldest boy Herbert worked in the summers for his Grandpa, William Lewis, who was B&B super.  One of his jobs every summer was painting all the water tanks.  He told me this was about like painting with asphalt!  Nasty stuff.

Herbert died a few years back and I think he was 102 years old.


On Apr 18, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Ken Riddle
 

The lampblack was added to the linseed oil at 53 percent black and 46 percent oil with one percent Japan Drier.  That makes what is called “semi-paste”.  To paint with it it was mixed two parts semi paste to three parts boiled linseed oil.  It’s nasty stuff but it will make anything black.

Uncle Big John Lewis’ oldest boy Herbert worked in the summers for his Grandpa, William Lewis, who was B&B super.  One of his jobs every summer was painting all the water tanks.  He told me this was about like painting with asphalt!  Nasty stuff.

Herbert died a few years back and I think he was 102 years old.


On Apr 18, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Tom Grabenstein
 

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




For Sale - Smokey Mountain Model Works

Steve Austin
 

3) 38ft ET&WNC flat cars with On3 trucks, couplets and decals. 

$55 each including postage or $150 for the lot of 3 including postage. 

Prefer Paypal to seaustin@...

Steve Austin

881 - 900 of 17927