Date   

Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940

Rae Augenstein
 

Watch “Our Town in the Movies: Scenes from Hampton,Tennessee circa 1940” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/333139398?ref=em-share 

Some cool stuff in here, not enough railroad though! But what great film. 
 
 
 
--
Rae Augenstein 
Johnson City 


Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Ken Riddle
 

Ha!  I don’t know why anybody would want to mix up that nasty paint stuff!!

Ken


On Apr 19, 2019, at 10:42 AM, Steve Austin <sea110947@...> wrote:

Ken, you are a wealth of information. Mostly useful😁

-------- Original message --------
From: Ken Riddle <keriddle@...>
Date: 4/19/19 9:46 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

The lampblack was added to the linseed oil at 53 percent black and 46 percent oil with one percent Japan Drier.  That makes what is called “semi-paste”.  To paint with it it was mixed two parts semi paste to three parts boiled linseed oil.  It’s nasty stuff but it will make anything black.

Uncle Big John Lewis’ oldest boy Herbert worked in the summers for his Grandpa, William Lewis, who was B&B super.  One of his jobs every summer was painting all the water tanks.  He told me this was about like painting with asphalt!  Nasty stuff.

Herbert died a few years back and I think he was 102 years old.


On Apr 18, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Steve Austin <sea110947@...>
 

Ken, you are a wealth of information. Mostly useful😁

-------- Original message --------
From: Ken Riddle <keriddle@...>
Date: 4/19/19 9:46 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: ETWNC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ETWNC] A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

The lampblack was added to the linseed oil at 53 percent black and 46 percent oil with one percent Japan Drier.  That makes what is called “semi-paste”.  To paint with it it was mixed two parts semi paste to three parts boiled linseed oil.  It’s nasty stuff but it will make anything black.

Uncle Big John Lewis’ oldest boy Herbert worked in the summers for his Grandpa, William Lewis, who was B&B super.  One of his jobs every summer was painting all the water tanks.  He told me this was about like painting with asphalt!  Nasty stuff.

Herbert died a few years back and I think he was 102 years old.


On Apr 18, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Ken Riddle
 

The lampblack was added to the linseed oil at 53 percent black and 46 percent oil with one percent Japan Drier.  That makes what is called “semi-paste”.  To paint with it it was mixed two parts semi paste to three parts boiled linseed oil.  It’s nasty stuff but it will make anything black.

Uncle Big John Lewis’ oldest boy Herbert worked in the summers for his Grandpa, William Lewis, who was B&B super.  One of his jobs every summer was painting all the water tanks.  He told me this was about like painting with asphalt!  Nasty stuff.

Herbert died a few years back and I think he was 102 years old.


On Apr 18, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Tom Grabenstein
 

Thank you Ken. This is very precise. I love all the materials from a bygone era that were used to make “the recipe.”

Doc Tom

On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:43 PM, Ken Riddle <keriddle@...> wrote:

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom




For Sale - Smokey Mountain Model Works

Steve Austin
 

3) 38ft ET&WNC flat cars with On3 trucks, couplets and decals. 

$55 each including postage or $150 for the lot of 3 including postage. 

Prefer Paypal to seaustin@...

Steve Austin


Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

johnny graybeal
 

I sell O scale ET&WNC decals for sale. $10  plus $2 for shipping. Does three stretched lettering cars and one Pre 1936 car.
Contact me for payment options.
Johnny Graybeal


Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Tuhr
 

Tom:  looks great and very good level of detail. I did my Sn3 hoppers in a very dark grey (NYC Dark Grey with some black added as I remember). My view being that black is too dark under artificial lighting. 

Please keep the photos coming. 


 

Tuhr Barnes

Chief Operating Officer

Engineering, Building and Services

Level 14, Tower Three, International Towers Sydney

Exchange Place, 300 Barangaroo Avenue, Barangaroo NSW 2000 Australia

+61 0409 848 013

MrTuhr@...


On 18 Apr 2019, at 11:17 am, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.

<fullsizeoutput_1777.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1778.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_1779.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177a.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177b.jpeg><fullsizeoutput_177c.jpeg>

Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.

<Hopper12End.jpeg><Hopper18l.jpg><img176.gif>

What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom



Re: A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Ken Riddle
 

Lampblack, linseed oil, and japan drier was the railroad recipe.


On Apr 17, 2019, at 9:17 PM, Tom Grabenstein <tomgmd@...> wrote:

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.


Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.


What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom



A scratch built "Tweetsie" hopper car and some questions.

Tom Grabenstein
 

Hello  Fellow Fans of the ETWNC,

I hope this finds you well and anticipating a joyous Easter. My model  railroad friend, Bill Nelson, and I have just completed a scratchbuilt “Tweetsie” Hopper car for my future On30 layout. Here are a few pictures of the model in primer gray.


Well, now I have some questions for you good people. What is the prototype color of these cars in 1920 – 1923? Prototype pictures done in black-and-white appear to show a Black or very dark gray external paint job.


What do you all think? Should the next paint be black??

As a second followup question,any ideas where to get decals for these cars in the ET&WNC livery in “O” scale?

Thank you in advance for any information you could provide. It is appreciated.

Please have a blessed and peaceful Easter!

Doc Tom



Re: Apri Historical Society Newsletter

Lee Bishop
 

I got mine two days ago on the west coast. Another great newsletter!
-Lee


Apri Historical Society Newsletter

Chris Ford
 

Hey y'all,

For those of you Historical Society members who get paper copies of the newsletter mailed to you, Patricia Jennings put them in the mail last week and they should be getting out to many of you by now. I got mine today in Memphis. I will post this newsletter to the Historical Society website for those who do not get the newsletter mailed to you.

If you're thinking of attending the Convention this year, there's a rundown of the events and agenda in this issue.

Mark May 31-June 2 on your calendar. Hope to see you there!

Thank you Curtis Brookshire for your work in getting all the ET news together in a timely manner!




Chris
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com


Re: A question about road bed.

Tom Grabenstein
 

Thanks Bill and Mike. Saving this good info. in an electronic folder for the new layout.
Tom

On Mar 30, 2019, at 8:20 PM, Mike West <west9628@bellsouth.net> wrote:

Go to PETCO and look for black aquarium gravel. Mix it with gray and you'll get the right colour.w
--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 3/30/19, William Uffelman via Groups.Io <ufffam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: Re: [ETWNC] A question about road bed.
To: "ETWNC@groups.io" <ETWNC@groups.io>
Date: Saturday, March 30, 2019, 6:47 PM

So .030" to
.050" in O scale.Take some calipers along.
Bill
Uffelman





On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 3:42 PM, Chris
Ford<chris@cfordart.com> wrote:

Going
out on the old ET&WNC right-of-way now you'll find
almost all mine tailings...mostly black with some very dark
gray...about 1.5 inches to 2.5 inches in size.



Mine tailings were VERY plentiful...they even used the
spoils as the aggregate in their concrete abutments and
piers. Lots of aggregate with a little mortar....much of it
still there over a hundred years later.







Chris





------------------------

Chris Ford

President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society

www.etwncrrhs.org

chris@cfordart.com

901-497-0809

------------------------

www.cfordart.com






On Sat, 30 Mar 2019 22:04:05 +0000 (UTC),
"William Uffelman via Groups.Io" wrote:


Check Arizona Rock and Minerals they should have
a dark gray almost black color. As to size I used an HO
ballast to get a fine look of gravel on my old On3 line.
Used N scale black as a cinder ballast.


Bill
Uffelman







On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 12:56 PM, Tom Grabenstein

<tomgmd@gmail.com> wrote:




Thank you Johnny for this very well thought out
contribution to this discussion about roadbed. Also a very
good explanation why the pictures we have show the “down
in the weeds look.”


The description of the ballast
used is also very helpful as I select ballast color.



I will proceed to elevate the
On30 track somewhat using Cork roadbed. I will also be
researching dark ballast colors to match the tailings from
the Cranberry mines.



Thank you to everyone who
responded to my request for help. It is greatly appreciated.
I will post pictures as this project moves along.



Doc Tom





My contribution to the
Clarksville Model Rail Road club.




















Re: A question about road bed.

Mike West
 

Go to PETCO and look for black aquarium gravel. Mix it with gray and you'll get the right colour.w
--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 3/30/19, William Uffelman via Groups.Io <ufffam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: Re: [ETWNC] A question about road bed.
To: "ETWNC@groups.io" <ETWNC@groups.io>
Date: Saturday, March 30, 2019, 6:47 PM

So .030" to
.050" in O scale.Take some calipers along.
Bill
Uffelman





On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 3:42 PM, Chris
Ford<chris@cfordart.com> wrote:

Going
out on the old ET&WNC right-of-way now you'll find
almost all mine tailings...mostly black with some very dark
gray...about 1.5 inches to 2.5 inches in size.



Mine tailings were VERY plentiful...they even used the
spoils as the aggregate in their concrete abutments and
piers. Lots of aggregate with a little mortar....much of it
still there over a hundred years later.







Chris

 



------------------------

Chris Ford

President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society

www.etwncrrhs.org

chris@cfordart.com

901-497-0809

------------------------

www.cfordart.com






On Sat, 30 Mar 2019 22:04:05 +0000 (UTC),
"William Uffelman via Groups.Io" wrote:

 
Check Arizona Rock and Minerals they should have
a dark gray almost black color. As to size I used an HO
ballast to get a fine look of gravel on my old On3 line.
Used N scale black as a cinder ballast.
 

Bill
Uffelman

 
 
 



On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 12:56 PM, Tom Grabenstein

<tomgmd@gmail.com> wrote:




Thank you Johnny for this very well thought out
contribution to this discussion about roadbed. Also a very
good explanation why the pictures we have show the “down
in the weeds look.”
 

The description of the ballast
used is also very helpful as I select ballast color.

 

I will proceed to elevate the
On30 track somewhat using Cork roadbed. I will also be
researching dark ballast colors to match the tailings from
the Cranberry mines. 

 

Thank you to everyone who
responded to my request for help. It is greatly appreciated.
I will post pictures as this project moves along.

 

Doc Tom

 



My contribution to the
Clarksville Model Rail Road club.


Re: A question about road bed.

William Uffelman
 

So .030" to .050" in O scale.Take some calipers along.

Bill Uffelman


On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 3:42 PM, Chris Ford
<chris@...> wrote:
Going out on the old ET&WNC right-of-way now you'll find almost all mine tailings...mostly black with some very dark gray...about 1.5 inches to 2.5 inches in size.

Mine tailings were VERY plentiful...they even used the spoils as the aggregate in their concrete abutments and piers. Lots of aggregate with a little mortar....much of it still there over a hundred years later.



Chris
 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sat, 30 Mar 2019 22:04:05 +0000 (UTC), "William Uffelman via Groups.Io" wrote:
 
Check Arizona Rock and Minerals they should have a dark gray almost black color. As to size I used an HO ballast to get a fine look of gravel on my old On3 line. Used N scale black as a cinder ballast.
 
Bill Uffelman
 
 
 
On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 12:56 PM, Tom Grabenstein
<tomgmd@...> wrote:
Thank you Johnny for this very well thought out contribution to this discussion about roadbed. Also a very good explanation why the pictures we have show the “down in the weeds look.”
 
The description of the ballast used is also very helpful as I select ballast color.
 
I will proceed to elevate the On30 track somewhat using Cork roadbed. I will also be researching dark ballast colors to match the tailings from the Cranberry mines. 
 
Thank you to everyone who responded to my request for help. It is greatly appreciated. I will post pictures as this project moves along.
 
Doc Tom
 
My contribution to the Clarksville Model Rail Road club.


Re: A question about road bed.

Chris Ford
 

Going out on the old ET&WNC right-of-way now you'll find almost all mine tailings...mostly black with some very dark gray...about 1.5 inches to 2.5 inches in size.

Mine tailings were VERY plentiful...they even used the spoils as the aggregate in their concrete abutments and piers. Lots of aggregate with a little mortar....much of it still there over a hundred years later.



Chris
 
------------------------
Chris Ford
President - ET&WNC Railroad Historical Society
www.etwncrrhs.org
chris@...
901-497-0809
------------------------
www.cfordart.com

On Sat, 30 Mar 2019 22:04:05 +0000 (UTC), "William Uffelman via Groups.Io" wrote:
 
Check Arizona Rock and Minerals they should have a dark gray almost black color. As to size I used an HO ballast to get a fine look of gravel on my old On3 line. Used N scale black as a cinder ballast.
 
Bill Uffelman
 
 
 
On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 12:56 PM, Tom Grabenstein
<tomgmd@...> wrote:
Thank you Johnny for this very well thought out contribution to this discussion about roadbed. Also a very good explanation why the pictures we have show the “down in the weeds look.”
 
The description of the ballast used is also very helpful as I select ballast color.
 
I will proceed to elevate the On30 track somewhat using Cork roadbed. I will also be researching dark ballast colors to match the tailings from the Cranberry mines. 
 
Thank you to everyone who responded to my request for help. It is greatly appreciated. I will post pictures as this project moves along.
 
Doc Tom
 
My contribution to the Clarksville Model Rail Road club.


Re: A question about road bed.

William Uffelman
 

Check Arizona Rock and Minerals they should have a dark gray almost black color. As to size I used an HO ballast to get a fine look of gravel on my old On3 line. Used N scale black as a cinder ballast.

Bill Uffelman


On Sat, Mar 30, 2019 at 12:56 PM, Tom Grabenstein
<tomgmd@...> wrote:
Thank you Johnny for this very well thought out contribution to this discussion about roadbed. Also a very good explanation why the pictures we have show the “down in the weeds look.”

The description of the ballast used is also very helpful as I select ballast color.

I will proceed to elevate the On30 track somewhat using Cork roadbed. I will also be researching dark ballast colors to match the tailings from the Cranberry mines. 

Thank you to everyone who responded to my request for help. It is greatly appreciated. I will post pictures as this project moves along.

Doc Tom

My contribution to the Clarksville Model Rail Road club.


Re: A question about road bed.

Tom Grabenstein
 

Thank you Johnny for this very well thought out contribution to this discussion about roadbed. Also a very good explanation why the pictures we have show the “down in the weeds look.”

The description of the ballast used is also very helpful as I select ballast color.

I will proceed to elevate the On30 track somewhat using Cork roadbed. I will also be researching dark ballast colors to match the tailings from the Cranberry mines. 

Thank you to everyone who responded to my request for help. It is greatly appreciated. I will post pictures as this project moves along.

Doc Tom

My contribution to the Clarksville Model Rail Road club.


Re: A question about road bed.

johnny graybeal
 

I have looked at all the ICC data on the ET&WNC/Linville River. The ET&WNC in the teens and twenties had a very good roadbed. None of the regional railroads at that time had the high ballast that we see today. The mine at Cranberry was cranking out a lot of ore, and tons and tons of tailings. The railroad used these tailings to have a very good roadbed. The ICC inspector in 1916 said the roadbed was comparable to any SG RR in the region. 
Most of the photos you see show the 30s and the 40s. This was after the Depression reduced maintenance crews to a minimum, and weeds were allowed to encroach. I agree with what others say. Use good ballast between the ties but not nearly as much at the ends. Remember however, that Iron ore tailings were black so the ballast needs to be fine, and dark in color to be prototypical. If you have any questions, contact me directly. I am trying to finish the next issue of the magazine and wont be checking email that often.
Johnny Graybeal


Re: A question about road bed.

Tom Grabenstein
 

Frank. Those are some great pictures and I appreciate your input on this subject.

Doc Tom


On Mar 29, 2019, at 8:29 PM, Frank Sergent <fsergent@...> wrote:

Tom,
 
 
Here’s a link to some really good pics of the ET with roadbed health clearly visible. Be aware that two of the pics are East Broad Top instead of ET (The one with the #15 engine and the one with the railroad crossing sign). Based on these pictures, it looks to me like the ends of the ties are typically visible on the mainline and the roadbed is elevated (at least on the mainline). I’m certain there are examples otherwise, but drainage is important for any road.
 
Frank
 
 
 
 

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