Date   

Re: Tweetsie in Myrtle Beach

Ken Riddle
 

The Pirateland locomotive was a standard gauge 2-4-2T that was stripped of
its saddle tank. I think it came from a brick plant in Augusta and was
built by H. K. Porter. It was saved by a machine shop guy named Cole
Walters out of Charleston (?) and he sold it to Pirateland. They didn't run
it long, and tried to convert it to oil firing with no success at all. It
was sold to either the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum or one of its
members and sat for a while in Chattanooga, along with another little 0-4-0
that came in the deal with it. It is now up at the Cowan, Tennessee
Railroad Museum all painted up and looking great. That is at the station at
the bottom of the Cumberland Mountain on the Nashville side of the old
NC&StL.



Ken



From: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Rick Shaw
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 8:40 AM
To: tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Tweetsie] Tweetsie in Myrtle Beach








Group:

I worked at Pirate Land, which was a theme based amusement park, just below
Myrtle Beach, SC during the summer of 1968. They had a steam locomotive that
had several excursion cars attached and a mile or so of track that was used
as one of the rides at the park. The train did a big circle and at some
point a couple of pirates stopped and robbed the train. Don't laugh;
pirates? trains?, I didn't get the connection either but it was fun and
people enjoyed the train ride except for the soot from the coal fired
locomotive.

I'm bringing this up, because, the park had a public address system that
gave information about the daily scheduled events that was a recorded tape
that ran over and over. After a couple of weeks working there, you had the
announcements memorized after hearing them play eight hours a day. I
remember that they referred to their locomotive as a 'sister locomotive to
the Tweetsie Railroad' that was probably operating at Ghost City which was
in western North Carolina at that time.

I am wondering if anyone in the group would have any idea if that locomotive
was actually a ET&WNC locomotive. I have the usual ET&WNC books and have
never seen any mention of one of the locomotives operating in Myrtle Beach.
I went by the old park a few years back and could only find a few remains of
the parking lot. The Pirate Land Campground, which was adjacent to the theme
park in 1968 was still in operation and it looked like most of the park was
now a privately owned camping area, complete with security guard.

If anyone has any information I would appreciate your imput.

On an unrelated note, I have a collection of ET&WNC hon3 locomotives,
rolling stock kits, structure kits that I am looking to get rid of. More
than likely I will try to sell it on eBay but, I would love to see that
entire lot go to someone that was really interested in modeling the ET&WNC.
My vision is not what it used to be and I have rediscovered O gauge, so, I
am getting rid of my hon3 collection.

Thanks,

Rickie K. Thornton
Aiken, SC


Re: Tweetsie in Myrtle Beach

Will Vanderburg <Army30th@...>
 

The engines at Tweetsie, the 12 (ET&WNC) and the 190 (WP&Y), with the exception of running on their respective railroads, and the 12 for a short time in Virginia, have never ran anywhere else. The train you refer to is probably a two foot gauge line at Ghost Town in the Sky in Maggie Valley, NC. It's an amusement park on top of a mountain. There's a 2 foot gauge steam locomotive that runs around the park there. You can find videos of it on the internet. It's not anything spectacular.

The 12 is the last of it's family...it's siblings from the ET no longer exist. It's been owned longer by Tweetsie than it was by the original railroad.

Will V.

William Vanderburg




To: tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
From: rickshaw01@hotmail.com
Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2012 08:40:07 -0400
Subject: [Tweetsie] Tweetsie in Myrtle Beach
































Group:



I worked at Pirate Land, which was a theme based amusement park, just below Myrtle Beach, SC during the summer of 1968. They had a steam locomotive that had several excursion cars attached and a mile or so of track that was used as one of the rides at the park. The train did a big circle and at some point a couple of pirates stopped and robbed the train. Don't laugh; pirates? trains?, I didn't get the connection either but it was fun and people enjoyed the train ride except for the soot from the coal fired locomotive.



I'm bringing this up, because, the park had a public address system that gave information about the daily scheduled events that was a recorded tape that ran over and over. After a couple of weeks working there, you had the announcements memorized after hearing them play eight hours a day. I remember that they referred to their locomotive as a 'sister locomotive to the Tweetsie Railroad' that was probably operating at Ghost City which was in western North Carolina at that time.



I am wondering if anyone in the group would have any idea if that locomotive was actually a ET&WNC locomotive. I have the usual ET&WNC books and have never seen any mention of one of the locomotives operating in Myrtle Beach. I went by the old park a few years back and could only find a few remains of the parking lot. The Pirate Land Campground, which was adjacent to the theme park in 1968 was still in operation and it looked like most of the park was now a privately owned camping area, complete with security guard.



If anyone has any information I would appreciate your imput.



On an unrelated note, I have a collection of ET&WNC hon3 locomotives, rolling stock kits, structure kits that I am looking to get rid of. More than likely I will try to sell it on eBay but, I would love to see that entire lot go to someone that was really interested in modeling the ET&WNC. My vision is not what it used to be and I have rediscovered O gauge, so, I am getting rid of my hon3 collection.



Thanks,



Rickie K. Thornton

Aiken, SC



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Paging Chris Allen

johnny graybeal
 

If the Chris Allen who sold pictures at train shows is on this list, please email me privately.
johnnyg@boone.net


Johnson City train depot to change hands Thursday

Rae Augenstein
 

http://www2.wjhl.com/business/2012/jun/26/train-depot-change-hands-thursday-ar-2015628/

Train depot to change hands Thursday

Published: June 26, 2012

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. --

Johnson City's nearly century-old train depot should officially have a
new owner as early as this week.

The Washington County Economic Development Council and Sevierville
attorney Joe Baker expect to close on the property along State of
Franklin Road Thursday.

Baker is buying the historic depot for $5,000 dollars.

The man is the owner of the Ole Smoky Distillery in Gatlinburg,Tennessee.

He plans to revitalize the Johnson City landmark and open a brewery there.

Also in his plans: enticing a restaurant to open up shop on the property.


Re: Question on the article

Ken Riddle
 

I think it was siding they used on the trailers that they got out of the
truck shop in Johnson City. 16 gauge galvanized I think.





From: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Mike West
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 3:15 PM
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] Question on the article





OK. Tks. I just dont think tin would oxidize to that bright color, but I can
see your point on the costs.mw

----- Original Message -----
From: Larry Smith
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 3:10 PM
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] Question on the article

Mike

Since the publication of Johnny's book, and he and I have had a
discussion on this, we have looked at the time frame these cars were
resheathed and the usage of aluminum, along with the cost at the time
and have come to the conclusion that they were of galvanized metal
sheathing. Aluminum was rather scarce prior to WW2 because of the
refining costs. Even for aircraft it wasn't used that much, The price I
have seen for Aluminum in 1939 was $21 a pound for sheet. That's
equivalent of $350 a pound today. That's a lot of money for just two
freight cars given the financial situation of the railroad at the time.
I also found that there were only two producers of sheet Aluminum at the
time.

Larry Smith

On 6/26/2012 12:30 PM, Mike West wrote:

See Johnny Graybeal's book Along the ETWNC Vol IV, Part A on freight
cars. The discussion on sheathing indicates it was aluminum on pages
57, 63, and 74.w
----- Original Message -----
From: Larry Smith
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 1:11 PM
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] Question on the article

Ray

There is a brief history of them in the latest issue of one time Every
Time.

Larry Smith

On 6/25/2012 10:34 PM, Chris Ford wrote:

Hey Ray,

The boxcar in question was covered in tin, and I remember in the early
days
of the Stemwinder that other photos of it brought up much speculation
as to
its outside covering and its origin. I found this "question and
answer" in
the "Twenty Questions" section of the Oct-Nov-Dec 1995 (8-2) issue
of the
Stemwinder that relates to your inquiry. As background, "Twenty
Questions"
was a fairly regular column in the early Stemwinders where John posted
answers to questions asked by members.

---------
Question #77: What color was the lettering on the tin-sided boxcars
and when
were they operated on the ET&WNC? Submitted by Franklin West

Answer: On those boxcars, #430 and #443, the lettering was not on
the tin
siding, but was on the wood base of the car. It was white lettering.
The tin
was applied to the sides of the old cars sometime after World War II and
they lasted until the end of the narrow gauge. The two car bodies were
sold
to a John Bradshaw for $100 in October 1950.
---------

Other folks on this group probably have some additional background
on the
car in question that they could contribute.

Hope this helps!

Chris

--------------------
Chris Ford

chris@cfordart.com <mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>
<mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>
<mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>

www.cfordart.com
www.cfordart.com/photoalbum

From: <ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>
<mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>
<mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>>
Reply-To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 09:31:23 -0400
To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: [Tweetsie] Question on the article

In the first photo of the fill what is the story of the first boxcar?

Ray


Re: Question on the article

Mike West
 

OK. Tks. I just dont think tin would oxidize to that bright color, but I can see your point on the costs.mw

----- Original Message -----
From: Larry Smith
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 3:10 PM
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] Question on the article



Mike

Since the publication of Johnny's book, and he and I have had a
discussion on this, we have looked at the time frame these cars were
resheathed and the usage of aluminum, along with the cost at the time
and have come to the conclusion that they were of galvanized metal
sheathing. Aluminum was rather scarce prior to WW2 because of the
refining costs. Even for aircraft it wasn't used that much, The price I
have seen for Aluminum in 1939 was $21 a pound for sheet. That's
equivalent of $350 a pound today. That's a lot of money for just two
freight cars given the financial situation of the railroad at the time.
I also found that there were only two producers of sheet Aluminum at the
time.

Larry Smith

On 6/26/2012 12:30 PM, Mike West wrote:
>
> See Johnny Graybeal's book Along the ETWNC Vol IV, Part A on freight
> cars. The discussion on sheathing indicates it was aluminum on pages
> 57, 63, and 74.w
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Larry Smith
> To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 1:11 PM
> Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] Question on the article
>
> Ray
>
> There is a brief history of them in the latest issue of one time Every
> Time.
>
> Larry Smith
>
> On 6/25/2012 10:34 PM, Chris Ford wrote:
> >
> > Hey Ray,
> >
> > The boxcar in question was covered in tin, and I remember in the early
> > days
> > of the Stemwinder that other photos of it brought up much speculation
> > as to
> > its outside covering and its origin. I found this "question and
> answer" in
> > the "Twenty Questions" section of the Oct-Nov-Dec 1995 (8-2) issue
> of the
> > Stemwinder that relates to your inquiry. As background, "Twenty
> Questions"
> > was a fairly regular column in the early Stemwinders where John posted
> > answers to questions asked by members.
> >
> > ---------
> > Question #77: What color was the lettering on the tin-sided boxcars
> > and when
> > were they operated on the ET&WNC? Submitted by Franklin West
> >
> > Answer: On those boxcars, #430 and #443, the lettering was not on
> the tin
> > siding, but was on the wood base of the car. It was white lettering.
> > The tin
> > was applied to the sides of the old cars sometime after World War II and
> > they lasted until the end of the narrow gauge. The two car bodies were
> > sold
> > to a John Bradshaw for $100 in October 1950.
> > ---------
> >
> > Other folks on this group probably have some additional background
> on the
> > car in question that they could contribute.
> >
> > Hope this helps!
> >
> > Chris
> >
> > --------------------
> > Chris Ford
> >
> > chris@cfordart.com <mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>
> <mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>
> >
> > www.cfordart.com
> > www.cfordart.com/photoalbum
> >
> > From: <ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>
> <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>>
> > Reply-To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
> <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
> > Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 09:31:23 -0400
> > To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
> <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
> > Subject: [Tweetsie] Question on the article
> >
> > In the first photo of the fill what is the story of the first boxcar?
> >
> > Ray
> >
>


Re: Question on the article

Larry Smith
 

Mike

Since the publication of Johnny's book, and he and I have had a
discussion on this, we have looked at the time frame these cars were
resheathed and the usage of aluminum, along with the cost at the time
and have come to the conclusion that they were of galvanized metal
sheathing. Aluminum was rather scarce prior to WW2 because of the
refining costs. Even for aircraft it wasn't used that much, The price I
have seen for Aluminum in 1939 was $21 a pound for sheet. That's
equivalent of $350 a pound today. That's a lot of money for just two
freight cars given the financial situation of the railroad at the time.
I also found that there were only two producers of sheet Aluminum at the
time.

Larry Smith

On 6/26/2012 12:30 PM, Mike West wrote:

See Johnny Graybeal's book Along the ETWNC Vol IV, Part A on freight
cars. The discussion on sheathing indicates it was aluminum on pages
57, 63, and 74.w
----- Original Message -----
From: Larry Smith
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 1:11 PM
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] Question on the article

Ray

There is a brief history of them in the latest issue of one time Every
Time.

Larry Smith

On 6/25/2012 10:34 PM, Chris Ford wrote:

Hey Ray,

The boxcar in question was covered in tin, and I remember in the early
days
of the Stemwinder that other photos of it brought up much speculation
as to
its outside covering and its origin. I found this "question and
answer" in
the "Twenty Questions" section of the Oct-Nov-Dec 1995 (8-2) issue
of the
Stemwinder that relates to your inquiry. As background, "Twenty
Questions"
was a fairly regular column in the early Stemwinders where John posted
answers to questions asked by members.

---------
Question #77: What color was the lettering on the tin-sided boxcars
and when
were they operated on the ET&WNC? Submitted by Franklin West

Answer: On those boxcars, #430 and #443, the lettering was not on
the tin
siding, but was on the wood base of the car. It was white lettering.
The tin
was applied to the sides of the old cars sometime after World War II and
they lasted until the end of the narrow gauge. The two car bodies were
sold
to a John Bradshaw for $100 in October 1950.
---------

Other folks on this group probably have some additional background
on the
car in question that they could contribute.

Hope this helps!

Chris

--------------------
Chris Ford

chris@cfordart.com <mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>
<mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>

www.cfordart.com
www.cfordart.com/photoalbum

From: <ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>
<mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>>
Reply-To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 09:31:23 -0400
To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: [Tweetsie] Question on the article

In the first photo of the fill what is the story of the first boxcar?

Ray


Re: 630 spotted

Kevin Gilliam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Pressley
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 2:24 PM
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] 630 spotted

The crowds trackside were unreal and only increased the nearer we got to Roanoke which remains proud of their steam locomotive heritage. I would imagine that the reaction is catching the attention of the higher-ups at Norfolk Southern!



David,
Judging by the crowds in Bassett and Boones Mill, it appears that there was some level of local advertising notifying people about the steam excursion. Up to this point, the crowds had been fairly light. There weren't even that many railfans chasing the NC trips. Once it left W-S and headed north, the railfans turned out in full force. Once it got to VA, you added the locals to the mix. They obviously heard about it from somewhere. For the program to survive, NS needs the publicity from the locals, not the railfans. If it continues, it's the best PR that money can buy-and buying good PR in the railroad industry is difficult at best. If the crowds continue like they were on Sunday, it will catch attention.
Kevin


Re: 630 spotted

David Pressley
 

The crowds trackside were unreal and only increased the nearer we got to Roanoke which remains proud of their steam locomotive heritage. I would imagine that the reaction is catching the attention of the higher-ups at Norfolk Southern!

________________________________
From: Kevin Gilliam <k_gilliam@bellsouth.net>
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:14 PM
Subject: RE: [Tweetsie] 630 spotted



 



-----Original Message-----
From: mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com [mailto:mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Pressley
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 7:16 AM
To: mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] 630 spotted

There are other intangibles - in the last 18 years I had gradually forgotten just how much fun a good, ole-fashioned (Norfolk) Southern steam excursion could be. There were lot's of railfans chasing us with much better (or at least much smaller better) camera equipment than what we had in 1994. We created lot's of traffic jams as many motorists tried to pace the locomotive. The stunned looks of local citizens in who had no idea a steam locomotive was coming as we whistled through their backyards or past their church parking lots...... it was all too much fun.

David


David,
I found that out last fall when they were running in Tennessee. Been a long time since riding on a steam excursion, and it was a lot of fun. Mom, Dad, kids, grandparents, and a bunch of railfans just going out and seeing the countryside for the day.

As far as traffic was concerned, I'd conservatively estimate the chase pack between 50-70 cars going north out of Winston up 311. I'd been wondering the past few weekends where all the railfans were. They showed up yesterday. I missed it by running ahead, but apparently the entire town of Basset, VA turned out to see the steam train. They were on both sides of the tracks in lawn chairs. From a friend, it looked like the county fair. A similar scene happened also in Boones Mill, VA where it appeared the whole turn turned up at the depot to see the 630 come by.

If nothing else, Norfolk Southern is getting a tremendous amount of positive PR out of this whole thing.
Kevin





Re: Question on the article

Mike West
 

See Johnny Graybeal's book Along the ETWNC Vol IV, Part A on freight cars. The discussion on sheathing indicates it was aluminum on pages 57, 63, and 74.w

----- Original Message -----
From: Larry Smith
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 1:11 PM
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] Question on the article



Ray

There is a brief history of them in the latest issue of one time Every Time.

Larry Smith

On 6/25/2012 10:34 PM, Chris Ford wrote:
>
> Hey Ray,
>
> The boxcar in question was covered in tin, and I remember in the early
> days
> of the Stemwinder that other photos of it brought up much speculation
> as to
> its outside covering and its origin. I found this "question and answer" in
> the "Twenty Questions" section of the Oct-Nov-Dec 1995 (8-2) issue of the
> Stemwinder that relates to your inquiry. As background, "Twenty Questions"
> was a fairly regular column in the early Stemwinders where John posted
> answers to questions asked by members.
>
> ---------
> Question #77: What color was the lettering on the tin-sided boxcars
> and when
> were they operated on the ET&WNC? Submitted by Franklin West
>
> Answer: On those boxcars, #430 and #443, the lettering was not on the tin
> siding, but was on the wood base of the car. It was white lettering.
> The tin
> was applied to the sides of the old cars sometime after World War II and
> they lasted until the end of the narrow gauge. The two car bodies were
> sold
> to a John Bradshaw for $100 in October 1950.
> ---------
>
> Other folks on this group probably have some additional background on the
> car in question that they could contribute.
>
> Hope this helps!
>
> Chris
>
> --------------------
> Chris Ford
>
> chris@cfordart.com <mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>
>
> www.cfordart.com
> www.cfordart.com/photoalbum
>
> From: <ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>>
> Reply-To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
> Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 09:31:23 -0400
> To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
> Subject: [Tweetsie] Question on the article
>
> In the first photo of the fill what is the story of the first boxcar?
>
> Ray
>
> ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>
> <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>
>
>
>
>


Re: Question on the article

Larry Smith
 

Ray

There is a brief history of them in the latest issue of one time Every Time.

Larry Smith

On 6/25/2012 10:34 PM, Chris Ford wrote:

Hey Ray,

The boxcar in question was covered in tin, and I remember in the early
days
of the Stemwinder that other photos of it brought up much speculation
as to
its outside covering and its origin. I found this "question and answer" in
the "Twenty Questions" section of the Oct-Nov-Dec 1995 (8-2) issue of the
Stemwinder that relates to your inquiry. As background, "Twenty Questions"
was a fairly regular column in the early Stemwinders where John posted
answers to questions asked by members.

---------
Question #77: What color was the lettering on the tin-sided boxcars
and when
were they operated on the ET&WNC? Submitted by Franklin West

Answer: On those boxcars, #430 and #443, the lettering was not on the tin
siding, but was on the wood base of the car. It was white lettering.
The tin
was applied to the sides of the old cars sometime after World War II and
they lasted until the end of the narrow gauge. The two car bodies were
sold
to a John Bradshaw for $100 in October 1950.
---------

Other folks on this group probably have some additional background on the
car in question that they could contribute.

Hope this helps!

Chris

--------------------
Chris Ford

chris@cfordart.com <mailto:chris%40cfordart.com>

www.cfordart.com
www.cfordart.com/photoalbum

From: <ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>>
Reply-To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 09:31:23 -0400
To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Tweetsie%40yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: [Tweetsie] Question on the article

In the first photo of the fill what is the story of the first boxcar?

Ray

ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>
<mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>




Tweetsie in Myrtle Beach

Rick Shaw <rickshaw01@...>
 

Group:

I worked at Pirate Land, which was a theme based amusement park, just below Myrtle Beach, SC during the summer of 1968. They had a steam locomotive that had several excursion cars attached and a mile or so of track that was used as one of the rides at the park. The train did a big circle and at some point a couple of pirates stopped and robbed the train. Don't laugh; pirates? trains?, I didn't get the connection either but it was fun and people enjoyed the train ride except for the soot from the coal fired locomotive.

I'm bringing this up, because, the park had a public address system that gave information about the daily scheduled events that was a recorded tape that ran over and over. After a couple of weeks working there, you had the announcements memorized after hearing them play eight hours a day. I remember that they referred to their locomotive as a 'sister locomotive to the Tweetsie Railroad' that was probably operating at Ghost City which was in western North Carolina at that time.

I am wondering if anyone in the group would have any idea if that locomotive was actually a ET&WNC locomotive. I have the usual ET&WNC books and have never seen any mention of one of the locomotives operating in Myrtle Beach. I went by the old park a few years back and could only find a few remains of the parking lot. The Pirate Land Campground, which was adjacent to the theme park in 1968 was still in operation and it looked like most of the park was now a privately owned camping area, complete with security guard.

If anyone has any information I would appreciate your imput.

On an unrelated note, I have a collection of ET&WNC hon3 locomotives, rolling stock kits, structure kits that I am looking to get rid of. More than likely I will try to sell it on eBay but, I would love to see that entire lot go to someone that was really interested in modeling the ET&WNC. My vision is not what it used to be and I have rediscovered O gauge, so, I am getting rid of my hon3 collection.

Thanks,

Rickie K. Thornton
Aiken, SC


Re: Question on the article

Chris Ford
 

Hey Ray,

The boxcar in question was covered in tin, and I remember in the early days
of the Stemwinder that other photos of it brought up much speculation as to
its outside covering and its origin. I found this "question and answer" in
the "Twenty Questions" section of the Oct-Nov-Dec 1995 (8-2) issue of the
Stemwinder that relates to your inquiry. As background, "Twenty Questions"
was a fairly regular column in the early Stemwinders where John posted
answers to questions asked by members.

---------
Question #77: What color was the lettering on the tin-sided boxcars and when
were they operated on the ET&WNC? Submitted by Franklin West

Answer: On those boxcars, #430 and #443, the lettering was not on the tin
siding, but was on the wood base of the car. It was white lettering. The tin
was applied to the sides of the old cars sometime after World War II and
they lasted until the end of the narrow gauge. The two car bodies were sold
to a John Bradshaw for $100 in October 1950.
---------

Other folks on this group probably have some additional background on the
car in question that they could contribute.

Hope this helps!



Chris


--------------------
Chris Ford

chris@cfordart.com

www.cfordart.com
www.cfordart.com/photoalbum



From: <ray@themontgomerys.info>
Reply-To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 09:31:23 -0400
To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Tweetsie] Question on the article






In the first photo of the fill what is the story of the first boxcar?

Ray

ray@themontgomerys.info <mailto:ray%40themontgomerys.info>


Re: 630 spotted

labee55
 

Hi Folks,

I think this may be the 2nd time I've posted .. I was on board the 630 trip Sunday also and it was really great seeing all the people chasing along with the tons of people who lined the tracks town after town after town. I don't think I saw that many people trackside when the 611 went up Saluda. It was awesome. Hat's off to NS. Great job.
Lindsay Abee

--- In Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com, "Lee Bishop" <p51@...> wrote:

I really can't see that being a danger of not happening with any American generation currently alive. When I was riding two trips behind 4449 at the NRHS convention last year, I saw plenty slack-jawed looks and people walking into stationary objects while looking at the train go past, and I am NOT talking about the train fans. Most people are surprised to see a steam locomotive go past.
And as much as 'preservationist' types decry Thomas the Tank engine, it's done more than any railroad buff group ever could to get future generations on board (so to speak).


--- In Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com, RICHARD BENTON <rbenton@> wrote:

It sure is good to hear that a steam locomotive still gets people's
attention in 2012.
Richard Benton
On Mon, Jun 25, 2012 at 1:14 PM, Kevin Gilliam <k_gilliam@>wrote:


Re: 630 spotted

Lee Bishop
 

I really can't see that being a danger of not happening with any American generation currently alive. When I was riding two trips behind 4449 at the NRHS convention last year, I saw plenty slack-jawed looks and people walking into stationary objects while looking at the train go past, and I am NOT talking about the train fans. Most people are surprised to see a steam locomotive go past.
And as much as 'preservationist' types decry Thomas the Tank engine, it's done more than any railroad buff group ever could to get future generations on board (so to speak).

--- In Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com, RICHARD BENTON <rbenton@...> wrote:

It sure is good to hear that a steam locomotive still gets people's
attention in 2012.
Richard Benton
On Mon, Jun 25, 2012 at 1:14 PM, Kevin Gilliam <k_gilliam@...>wrote:


Re: 630 spotted

RICHARD BENTON
 

It sure is good to hear that a steam locomotive still gets people's
attention in 2012.
Richard Benton
On Mon, Jun 25, 2012 at 1:14 PM, Kevin Gilliam <k_gilliam@bellsouth.net>wrote:

**




-----Original Message-----
From: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of David Pressley
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 7:16 AM
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] 630 spotted

There are other intangibles - in the last 18 years I had gradually
forgotten just how much fun a good, ole-fashioned (Norfolk) Southern steam
excursion could be. There were lot's of railfans chasing us with much
better (or at least much smaller better) camera equipment than what we had
in 1994. We created lot's of traffic jams as many motorists tried to pace
the locomotive. The stunned looks of local citizens in who had no idea a
steam locomotive was coming as we whistled through their backyards or past
their church parking lots...... it was all too much fun.

David


David,
I found that out last fall when they were running in Tennessee. Been a
long time since riding on a steam excursion, and it was a lot of fun. Mom,
Dad, kids, grandparents, and a bunch of railfans just going out and seeing
the countryside for the day.

As far as traffic was concerned, I'd conservatively estimate the chase
pack between 50-70 cars going north out of Winston up 311. I'd been
wondering the past few weekends where all the railfans were. They showed up
yesterday. I missed it by running ahead, but apparently the entire town of
Basset, VA turned out to see the steam train. They were on both sides of
the tracks in lawn chairs. From a friend, it looked like the county fair. A
similar scene happened also in Boones Mill, VA where it appeared the whole
turn turned up at the depot to see the 630 come by.

If nothing else, Norfolk Southern is getting a tremendous amount of
positive PR out of this whole thing.
Kevin



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 630 spotted

Kevin Gilliam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Pressley
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 7:16 AM
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Tweetsie] 630 spotted

There are other intangibles - in the last 18 years I had gradually forgotten just how much fun a good, ole-fashioned (Norfolk) Southern steam excursion could be. There were lot's of railfans chasing us with much better (or at least much smaller better) camera equipment than what we had in 1994. We created lot's of traffic jams as many motorists tried to pace the locomotive. The stunned looks of local citizens in who had no idea a steam locomotive was coming as we whistled through their backyards or past their church parking lots...... it was all too much fun.

David



David,
I found that out last fall when they were running in Tennessee. Been a long time since riding on a steam excursion, and it was a lot of fun. Mom, Dad, kids, grandparents, and a bunch of railfans just going out and seeing the countryside for the day.

As far as traffic was concerned, I'd conservatively estimate the chase pack between 50-70 cars going north out of Winston up 311. I'd been wondering the past few weekends where all the railfans were. They showed up yesterday. I missed it by running ahead, but apparently the entire town of Basset, VA turned out to see the steam train. They were on both sides of the tracks in lawn chairs. From a friend, it looked like the county fair. A similar scene happened also in Boones Mill, VA where it appeared the whole turn turned up at the depot to see the 630 come by.

If nothing else, Norfolk Southern is getting a tremendous amount of positive PR out of this whole thing.
Kevin


Question on the article

ray@themontgomerys.info
 

In the first photo of the fill what is the story of the first boxcar?



Ray

ray@themontgomerys.info


Re: 630 spotted

David Pressley
 

I was aboard the train yesterday. #630 is looking good and sounding good. Of equal interest to me was finally having a chance to ride the famed 'pumpkinvine' route where scheduled passenger service ended the year before I was born.
 
There are other intangibles - in the last 18 years I had gradually forgotten just how much fun a good, ole-fashioned (Norfolk) Southern steam excursion could be. There were lot's of railfans chasing us with much better (or at least much smaller better) camera equipment than what we had in 1994. We created lot's of traffic jams as many motorists tried to pace the locomotive. The stunned looks of local citizens in who had no idea a steam locomotive was coming as we whistled through their backyards or past their church parking lots...... it was all too much fun.
 
David
 

 

________________________________
From: patl710m <pjleonard3@northstate.net>
To: Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2012 12:06 PM
Subject: [Tweetsie] 630 spotted



 

Sunday noon

I just got a call from a good friend from his farm near NC 220 just south of the NC - Va line. 630 just highballed north toward Roanoke.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Walk to the Wilder Mine

Chris Ford
 

Thanks for posting this Jerry. Wish we'd had that photo on the hike up to
Wilder mine during the convention. For anyone who doesn't have the
Stemwinder CD or one of the original Stemwinders from back that far, I've
uploaded that story in PDF format here...

http://www.cfordart.com/culverts6-3Stemwinder1994.pdf


I thought some modelers might be interested in the rest of the article so I
included the whole thing. Thanks to Ken Anderson for the writing that
article for John way back in 1994.


Chris

--------------------
Chris Ford

chris@cfordart.com

www.cfordart.com
www.cfordart.com/photoalbum



From: Doris <doristurbyfill@bellsouth.net>
Reply-To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2012 20:51:29 -0000
To: <Tweetsie@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Tweetsie] Walk to the Wilder Mine






If you want to see a picture of the Greer Fill at State Line Hill just
across the Tennessee State Line, go to the Blue Ridge Stemwinder All-Time CD
table of contents. Go to 6/3 Jan-Feb-March 1994 and then go to culverts and
retaining walls, by Ken Anderson. To get an idea of the scale of the fill,
look at the culvert all the way at the bottom below the train. I would post
a picture myself, but couldn't get it to load.

Thanks,
Jerry & Doris

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