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Hayward Shoreline/Frank's Dump yesterday

Lori Arthur <loriarthur61@...>
 

Hi everybody. Yesterday morning I birded Hayward Shoreline via West Winton Avenue, hoping for fallout from the sto-rm. It was excellent birding, with high numbers and diversity of both landbirds and shorebirds.

At the parking lot the hummingbird diversity was striking, with numerous ANNA'S and ALLEN'S, as well as single COSTA'S and 1 or 2 BLACK-CHINNED. FOX and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS and CALIFORNIA TOWHEE were in myoporums, and SAVANNAH and SONG SPARROWS were numerous everywhere; the trees had many YELLOW-RUMPED and ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS and a single, very vocal COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. The best bird was a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER that perched for extended periods in the bushes, showing well its dusky grayish colors and small, mostly dark bill.

At Frank's Dump, the shorebird flocks were mainly WESTERN SANDPIPERS, WILLETS, and MARBLED GODWITS, with RED KNOTS, DOWITCHERS, DUNLINS, LEASTS, AMERICAN AVOCETS, two BLACK-NECKED STILTS, and a single BLACK TURNSTONE mixed in.  A breeding PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER was with a group of BLACK-BELLIED. Also, I got a brief view of a strange sandpiper that looked a little smaller than a dowitcher, with a long, Dunlin-like bill and nonbreeding Dunlin-like upperparts, but black arrowheads on the lower flanks. Any ideas? CASPIAN and FORSTER'S TERNS, G-WINGED and WESTERN GULLS; ducks included AMERICAN WIGEONS, both SCAUP, and a COMMON GOLDENEYE.

-- Noah Arthur, Oakland

Ken Schneider
 

I visited the West Winton entrance to Hayward Shoreline this morning (4/15) from around 7-8 am and it was indeed quite birdy along the entrance road to the parking lot that is lined in part by flowering eucalyptus. I did find a nice adult male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, as well as two immature/female Rufous/Allen's hummingbirds and numerous ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRDS. I missed the Costa's and Black-chinned. Also noted in this area were three ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, two WILSON'S WARBLERS, a male BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, numerous AUDUBON'S YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS (my estimate was 15) and a lingering LINCOLN'S SPARROW. There were so many small passerines in the trees and shrubs that I probably missed many birds and was very reluctant to leave, but late for work... I looked very briefly for the longspur but gave up pretty quickly after encountering a lot of noise and heavy machinery in the dirt field north of the paved path out towards Hayward's Landing.

Ken Schneider
Redwood City

--- In EBB_Sightings@..., Lori Arthur <loriarthur61@...> wrote:

Hi everybody. Yesterday morning I birded Hayward Shoreline via West Winton Avenue, hoping for fallout from the sto-rm. It was excellent birding, with high numbers and diversity of both landbirds and shorebirds.

At the parking lot the hummingbird diversity was striking, with numerous ANNA'S and ALLEN'S, as well as single COSTA'S and 1 or 2 BLACK-CHINNED. FOX and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS and CALIFORNIA TOWHEE were in myoporums, and SAVANNAH and SONG SPARROWS were numerous everywhere; the trees had many YELLOW-RUMPED and ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS and a single, very vocal COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. The best bird was a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER that perched for extended periods in the bushes, showing well its dusky grayish colors and small, mostly dark bill.

At Frank's Dump, the shorebird flocks were mainly WESTERN SANDPIPERS, WILLETS, and MARBLED GODWITS, with RED KNOTS, DOWITCHERS, DUNLINS, LEASTS, AMERICAN AVOCETS, two BLACK-NECKED STILTS, and a single BLACK TURNSTONE mixed in.  A breeding PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER was with a group of BLACK-BELLIED. Also, I got a brief view of a strange sandpiper that looked a little smaller than a dowitcher, with a long, Dunlin-like bill and nonbreeding Dunlin-like upperparts, but black arrowheads on the lower flanks. Any ideas? CASPIAN and FORSTER'S TERNS, G-WINGED and WESTERN GULLS; ducks included AMERICAN WIGEONS, both SCAUP, and a COMMON GOLDENEYE.

-- Noah Arthur, Oakland