Frank's Dump today (17 Oct)


Bob Toleno
 

After a brief lull, Frank's Dump is back to its former glory! I visited today at high tide and i'm happy to report that the pond is full of water again and overall shorebird numbers are just about as high as i've ever seen. Also, i was very pleased to see that the returning water shifted the silt around so that many of the main "islands" used for roosting are now significantly closer to the levee than they have been for a number of years. This made viewing a real treat, with much better scope views than i've had in a while. The best birds of the day were THREE Pacific Golden-Plovers, my personal high count and the highest eBird count for this location. Also of interest were 11 Ruddy Turnstones, 26 Elegant Terns, and a couple Sanderlings.

One strange observation was that, in spite of almost two hours of shorebirding there, i couldn't find a single Red Knot. It's possible that there were a few in the most distant groups of shorebirds that wind vibrations made difficult to scope, or that i simply missed some hiding behind larger birds. Regardless, it was still odd, given that i'm used to finding at least a few dozen on just about every visit during the fall thru spring. I know that this local population has been declining in number slowly year after year for the past few decades. It would be interesting to me if others who bird here would pay special attention for this species' numbers.

My eBird checklist is here:

Good birding,
Bob Toleno
Hayward


Maureen Lahiff
 

Thanks for the update.

Great to hear the site is meeting the shorebirds’ needs, and a joy for us!


Sent from the all new AOL app for iOS

On Sunday, October 17, 2021, 4:24 PM, Bob Toleno <bob@...> wrote:

After a brief lull, Frank's Dump is back to its former glory! I visited today at high tide and i'm happy to report that the pond is full of water again and overall shorebird numbers are just about as high as i've ever seen. Also, i was very pleased to see that the returning water shifted the silt around so that many of the main "islands" used for roosting are now significantly closer to the levee than they have been for a number of years. This made viewing a real treat, with much better scope views than i've had in a while. The best birds of the day were THREE Pacific Golden-Plovers, my personal high count and the highest eBird count for this location. Also of interest were 11 Ruddy Turnstones, 26 Elegant Terns, and a couple Sanderlings.

One strange observation was that, in spite of almost two hours of shorebirding there, i couldn't find a single Red Knot. It's possible that there were a few in the most distant groups of shorebirds that wind vibrations made difficult to scope, or that i simply missed some hiding behind larger birds. Regardless, it was still odd, given that i'm used to finding at least a few dozen on just about every visit during the fall thru spring. I know that this local population has been declining in number slowly year after year for the past few decades. It would be interesting to me if others who bird here would pay special attention for this species' numbers.

My eBird checklist is here:

Good birding,
Bob Toleno
Hayward